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I want to check if there is anything changes in a table in EF 4.0 with the following code:

var a = context.Users.GetHashCode();

AddNewUser();

context.SaveChanges();

var b = context.Users.GetHashCode();

a == b, I don't know why?

Any helps would be appreciated!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

GetHashCode has absolutelly different usage. You can't detect changes in ObjectSet because it is entry point to related database table(s). You can detect changes prepared in ObjectContext but only before you accept changes (default SaveChanges also accept changes). To get changes from ObjectContext use:

context.ObjectStateManager.GetObjectStateEntries(...)
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Thanks for your answer. I've edited my question, what if I want to check table changes? –  ByulTaeng Feb 23 '11 at 11:52
    
@NVA: Why do you want it? First of all think about doing the same in SQL. –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 23 '11 at 11:55
    
I want to make a lot of changes inside a TransactionScope and if 1 change failed then all changes made before to the db will be rollback. –  ByulTaeng Feb 23 '11 at 12:00
1  
@NVA: That is direct functionality of TransactionScope. You don't need to detect changes manually. You simply need to throw exception when failure occures or dispose scope without calling Complete method. –  Ladislav Mrnka Feb 23 '11 at 12:04

it is possible that GetHashCode is not considering the real content of the items of the ObjectSet, can't you simply check the count in your case or check the changed property?

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Thanks for fast reply but I'm still finding a way to check the state of ObjectSet without using GetHashCode() –  ByulTaeng Feb 23 '11 at 11:21
    
what happens if you call context.DetectChanges() after your AddNewUser() method call? –  Davide Piras Feb 23 '11 at 11:26
    
I've tried it already but they're still the same. –  ByulTaeng Feb 23 '11 at 11:33

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