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function timeClock()
{
    setTimeout("timeClock()", 1000);        
    now = new Date();
    alert(now);
    f_date = now.getDate()+" "+strMonth(now.getMonth())+" "+now.getFullYear()+" / "+timeFormat(now.getHours(), now.getMinutes());
    return f_date;
}

<span class="foo"><script type="text/javascript">document.write(timeClock());</script></span>

alert(now); gives me the value every second but it is not updated in the html. How can I update the time on the html without refresh the page?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 17 down vote accepted

There are a number of mistakes in your code. Without the use of var infront of your variable declarations, you leak them into the global scope.

Also, the use of document.write is discouraged.

Here's how I would do it:

JavaScript:

function updateClock() {
    var now = new Date(), // current date
        months = ['January', 'February', '...']; // you get the idea
        time = now.getHours() + ':' + now.getMinutes(), // again, you get the idea

        // a cleaner way than string concatenation
        date = [now.getDate(), 
                months[now.getMonth()],
                now.getFullYear()].join(' ');

    // set the content of the element with the ID time to the formatted string
    document.getElementById('time').innerHTML = [date, time].join(' / ');

    // call this function again in 1000ms
    setTimeout(updateClock, 1000);
}
updateClock(); // initial call

HTML:

<div id="time"> </div>
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7  
Ivo - good grief man, I'm sure you could have offered your solution without being rude. No one is without mistakes: "then" -> "than"? Come on man. –  d2burke Feb 8 '12 at 14:47
x = document.getElementsByTagName('SPAN').item(0);
x.innerHTML = f_date;

try putting this code block instead of return statement, i haven't test it but it will probably work

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First time documrnt.write is showing the undefined value.[ 23 Feb 2011 / 7.47 PM ISTundefined]. After a second it shows me the correct value. –  alex Feb 23 '11 at 14:16

There may be something in timeago jQuery plugin you can hook into, but I haven't honestly tried...

http://timeago.yarp.com/

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function timeClock()
{
    setTimeout("timeClock()", 1000);        
    now = new Date();
    alert(now);
    f_date = now.getDate()+" "+strMonth(now.getMonth())+" "+now.getFullYear()+" / "+timeFormat(now.getHours(), now.getMinutes());

    document.getElementById("foo").innerHTML = f_date;

}

<span id="foo"></span>
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$('span.foo').html(f_date);

place this inside your timeclock() function

untested

    function timeClock()
    {
        setTimeout("timeClock()", 1000);        
        now = new Date();
        alert(now);
        f_date = now.getDate()+" "+strMonth(now.getMonth())+" "+now.getFullYear()+" / "+timeFormat(now.getHours(), now.getMinutes());
       $('span.foo').html(f_date);

}
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I'd use setInterval rather than setTimeout:

https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/window.setInterval

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1  
it is advised to avoid setInterval() have a look here weblogs.asp.net/bleroy/archive/2009/05/14/… –  3nigma Feb 23 '11 at 14:15

I think your setTmeout function has the wrong variables, the first one should be a function not a string, that confused me for a bit. Basically you need to write to the span tag when you run the function.

I created a jQuery version in a fiddle to demonstrate what I mean. Didn't have your strMonth function but you get the idea. I also changed the alert to console.log but you can remove that line.

http://jsfiddle.net/5JWEV/

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