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I'm trying to convert my JavaScript functions to a dojo Class. I've a setTimeOut("functionName",2000) in one of my JS method. How do I call this from a method in the class decared using dojo.declare method. For example, below is my custom class.

    dojo.declare("Person",null,{
                    constructor:function(age,country,name,state){
                        this.age=age;
                        this.country=country;
                        this.name=name;
                        this.state=state;
                    },
                    moveToNewState:function(newState){
                        this.state=newState;
//I need to call "isStateChanged" method after 2000 ms. How do I do this?
                        setTimeOut("isStateChanged",2000);
                    },                  
                    isStateChanged:function(){
                        alert('state is updated');
                    }
                });
var person=new Person(12,"US","Test","TestState");
person.moveToNewState("NewState");

Please let me know how I can call isStateChanged method from moveToNewState method after 2000ms.

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It's setTimeout, not setTimeOut, and it's best (always, or almost always) to pass it a function reference, not a string it has to compile. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 23 '11 at 14:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

What you're looking for is a way of binding the this value to the function that setTimeout will call:

moveToNewState:function(newState){
    // Remember `this` in a variable within this function call
    var context = this;

    // Misc logic
    this.state = newState;

    // Set up the callback
    setTimeout(function() {
        // Call it
        context.isStateChanged();
    }, 2000);
},     

The above is using a closure to bind the contxt (see: Closures are not complicated), which is the usual way to do this. Dojo may offer a built-in function for generating these "bound" callbacks (Prototype and jQuery do). (Edit: It does, in his comment below peller kindly points out dojo.hitch.) More about this general concept here: You must remember this

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Thank you very much for your reply. It worked. Why are we creating a new variable called context and then assigning the current object to it? I thought "this" will refer to "Person" object and it has got a method "isStateChanged" –  Steven Feb 23 '11 at 14:52
    
@Steven: "Why are we creating a new variable called context and then assigning the current object to it?" Because this (in JavaScript) is defined entirely by how a function is called, not where a function is defined. setTimeout calls the function in the global context, which on browsers means this will be window, which obviously isn't want you want. More in the You must remember this link above, as well as here: Mythical methods –  T.J. Crowder Feb 23 '11 at 15:21
    
Thank you very much Crowder for the help.. –  Steven Feb 24 '11 at 3:55
    
The closure is actually not necessary in this case, but dojo.hitch is Dojo's equivalent for binding variables. –  peller Mar 13 '11 at 3:07
    
@peller: Ah, there you go, thanks. I knew Dojo would have one. Remember that there's a closure involved regardless, it's just a matter of what it closes over -- jQuery's proxy, Prototype's bind, and Dojo's hitch will all create closures, but they do it in a nice, well-contained scope within the library code so the closure isn't unnecessarily keeping anything additional in memory. –  T.J. Crowder Mar 13 '11 at 6:18

You could simply call setTimeout(this.isStateChanged, 2000) which will pass the correct function reference, not unlike the way you would call the method directly. The expression this.isStateChanged is evaluated immediately. To make the call, there's no need to wrap it in an extra function or declare local variables.

To bind the this variable to the called function, you can use dojo.hitch which will create its own closure without polluting the local variable space and potentially leaking through other references.

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This has nothing to do with dojo, this is pure javascript. What you're looking for is:

var $this = this;
setTimeout(function() { $this.isStateChanged() }, 2000);

Check out the docs on setTimeout.

Oh, and, please don't use quotes around your function names (because that makes it a useless string that will probably get evaled and will give an error).

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your reply. It worked. Why are we creating a new variable called $this and then assigning the current object to it? I thought "this" will refer to "Person" object and it has got a method "isStateChanged" –  Steven Feb 23 '11 at 14:22
    
this does refer to the Person instance, but only in the moveToNewState closure. When the timeout is fired, it's context (read: the this magic variable) will not be the Person instance, but to window. This is why you need to store the instance in a differently-named variable. T.J. Crowder posted some good links about this issue. –  Felix Feb 23 '11 at 15:32
    
Thank you very much Felix for your kind reply –  Steven Feb 24 '11 at 3:55

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