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“int main (vooid)”? How does that work?

main(a,b,c)
{
    a=1;
    b=2;
    c=3;
    printf("%d %d %d",a,b,c);
}

How three Integer arguments a,b,c are possible inside main, as we know that the second formal parameter has to be a pointer to a pointer to a character?

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marked as duplicate by Josh Lee, Péter Török, David Gelhar, Joachim Sauer, Andrzej Doyle Feb 23 '11 at 15:46

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3 Answers

Argument parameters are implicitly int, unless you specify otherwise.

main is only required to be main(void) or main(int, char **) on a hosted platform (i.e., running under an OS, basically). In a freestanding implementation, the prototype for main is implementation-defined.

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This syntax is deprecated in C. Just don't use it

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a) pointers are (almost always) ints
b) some environments, including windows allow three parameters.

edit: Recognised pointers are not always ints.

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No they are not ints, they can be ints, but most definately do not have to be. –  wich Feb 23 '11 at 14:21
3  
@wich: I'll take it even further. They are never ints, they just may be the same size as ints. –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 23 '11 at 14:25
    
What's the difference between being an int, and being indistinguishable from an int? This isn't a high-level language where all representations are numinous. –  Marcin Feb 23 '11 at 14:27
    
@Marcin: Saying that "a pointer is normally an int" is as meaningful as saying "a float is normally an int". –  Oli Charlesworth Feb 23 '11 at 15:14
    
@Oli Charlesworth: A specious analogy if ever I saw one. The behaviour of float and int under arithmetic operations is different, even if their length is the same. By contrast, casting a pointer to an int (assuming they are the same length), and performing arithmetic will result in exactly the same results as if no cast had occurred. –  Marcin Feb 23 '11 at 15:18
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