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Do you have a good reference on Python's slice notation? To me, this notation needs a bit of picking up. It looks extremely powerful, but I haven't quite got my head around it and am looking for a good guide.

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56  
what's wrong with the tutorial? docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html#strings yeah, i know... seasoned programmers can't be asked to. –  hop Feb 4 '09 at 0:04
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17 Answers

up vote 738 down vote accepted

It's pretty simple really:

a[start:end] # items start through end-1
a[start:]    # items start through the rest of the array
a[:end]      # items from the beginning through end-1
a[:]         # a copy of the whole array

There is also the step value, which can be used with any of the above:

a[start:end:step] # start through not past end, by step

The key point to remember is that the :end value represents the first value that is not in the selected slice. So, the difference beween end and start is the number of elements selected (if step is 1, the default).

The other feature is that start or end may be a negative number, which means it counts from the end of the array instead of the beginning. So:

a[-1]    # last item in the array
a[-2:]   # last two items in the array
a[:-2]   # everything except the last two items

Python is kind to the programmer if there are fewer items than you ask for. For example, if you ask for a[:-2] and a only contains one element, you get an empty list instead of an error. Sometimes you would prefer the error, so you have to be aware that this may happen.

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343  
and a[::-1] to reverse a string. –  Christopher Mahan Feb 3 '09 at 23:54
3  
You can give meaning to index -2 by reading it as length-2. (But don't forget the edge cases) –  Kos Aug 22 '12 at 22:06
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Also can be important that [:] returns a shallow copy of a list. it means that every slice notation returns a list which have new address in memory, but its elements would have same addresses that elements of source list have. –  Gill Bates Dec 30 '12 at 17:07
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@DenysS: Yes, after taking a slice of a list, changes in the slice do not affect the original (and vice versa). A new list object is returned. –  Greg Hewgill Feb 25 '13 at 17:55
2  
Slicing builtin types returns a copy but that's not universal. Notably, slicing NumPy arrays returns a view that shares memory with the original. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Sep 23 '13 at 0:13
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The tutorial talks about it:

http://docs.python.org/tutorial/introduction.html#strings

(Scroll down a bit until you get to the part about slicing.)

The ASCII art diagram is helpful too for remembering how slices work:

 +---+---+---+---+---+
 | H | e | l | p | A |
 +---+---+---+---+---+
 0   1   2   3   4   5
-5  -4  -3  -2  -1

"One way to remember how slices work is to think of the indices as pointing between characters, with the left edge of the first character numbered 0."

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I use this diagram, with the indexes labeled in the middle of each character as well (to explicitly contrast slicing with indexing). –  Thomas Feb 9 '11 at 14:57
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@Thomas Indexing is basically like slicing a[n] = a[n:n+1][0] so there's no need for another set of labels. Just imagine the boxes as square ballons tightly tied to the numbers by lower left corner. ;) –  Alois Mahdal Sep 9 '13 at 10:53
    
And now there is a similar description for Python 3.3 - docs.python.org/3.3/tutorial/introduction.html#strings –  Achmed Durangi Oct 22 '13 at 6:46
    
What happens in s[3:1:-1] though, doesn't make a lot of sense to me. –  huggie Apr 13 at 0:40
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Enumerating the possibilities allowed by the grammar:

>>> seq[:]                # [seq[0],   seq[1],          ..., seq[-1]    ]
>>> seq[low:]             # [seq[low], seq[low+1],      ..., seq[-1]    ]
>>> seq[:high]            # [seq[0],   seq[1],          ..., seq[high-1]]
>>> seq[low:high]         # [seq[low], seq[low+1],      ..., seq[high-1]]
>>> seq[::stride]         # [seq[0],   seq[stride],     ..., seq[-1]    ]
>>> seq[low::stride]      # [seq[low], seq[low+stride], ..., seq[-1]    ]
>>> seq[:high:stride]     # [seq[0],   seq[stride],     ..., seq[high-1]]
>>> seq[low:high:stride]  # [seq[low], seq[low+stride], ..., seq[high-1]]

Of course, if (high-low)%stride != 0, then the end point will be a little lower than high-1.

Extended slicing (with commas and ellipses) are mostly used only by special data structures (like Numpy); the basic sequences don't support them.

>>> class slicee:
...     def __getitem__(self, item):
...         return `item`
...
>>> slicee()[0, 1:2, ::5, ...]
'(0, slice(1, 2, None), slice(None, None, 5), Ellipsis)'
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The 10 in the final output line should be a 5. –  Lee D Apr 19 '12 at 3:16
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The answers above don't discuss slice assignment:

>>> r=[1,2,3,4]
>>> r[1:1]
[]
>>> r[1:1]=[9,8]
>>> r
[1, 9, 8, 2, 3, 4]
>>> r[1:1]=['blah']
>>> r
[1, 'blah', 9, 8, 2, 3, 4]

This may also clarify the difference between slicing and indexing.

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You may want to add an example of using slice assignment to remove one or more elements from a sequence. If you do, I will remove my answer. –  dansalmo Apr 5 '13 at 17:43
    
There are a lot of interesting things you could discuss about slice assignment, if this answer were more than just a code snippet. Only iterables can be assigned in this manner, and if the specified slice has nonzero width, the elements it references in the original list will be replaced by the assigned iterable. An empty string assigned to a slice will remove the sliced elements, but a non-empty string assigned to a slice will be treated as a sequence of characters. –  AirThomas Oct 10 '13 at 23:22
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And a couple of things that weren't immediately obvious to me when I first saw the slicing syntax:

>>> x = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
>>> x[::-1]
[6,5,4,3,2,1]

Easy way to reverse sequences!

And if you wanted, for some reason, every second item in the reversed sequence:

>>> x = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
>>> x[::-2]
[6,4,2]
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reversed() would be better –  hop Feb 4 '09 at 0:07
9  
It gets tricky when using negative steps with start and end. It seems like using a negative step maps begin and end into the negative space. I.e., if you want to select only parts of something reversed by "[::-1]" you will have to use e.g. [1,2,3,4][-1:-5:-1] => [4, 3, 2, 1]. This is trial and error - I've just ran across this. –  blueyed Feb 4 '11 at 11:54
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Found this great table at http://wiki.python.org/moin/MovingToPythonFromOtherLanguages

Python indexes and slices for a six-element list.
Indexes enumerate the elements, slices enumerate the spaces between the elements.

Index from rear:    -6  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1      a=[0,1,2,3,4,5]    a[1:]==[1,2,3,4,5]
Index from front:    0   1   2   3   4   5      len(a)==6          a[:5]==[0,1,2,3,4]
                   +---+---+---+---+---+---+    a[0]==0            a[:-2]==[0,1,2,3]
                   | a | b | c | d | e | f |    a[5]==5            a[1:2]==[1]
                   +---+---+---+---+---+---+    a[-1]==5           a[1:-1]==[1,2,3,4]
Slice from front:  :   1   2   3   4   5   :    a[-2]==4
Slice from rear:   :  -5  -4  -3  -2  -1   :
                                                b=a[:]
                                                b==[0,1,2,3,4,5] (shallow copy of a)
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After using it a bit I realise that the simplest description is that it is exactly the same as the arguments in a for loop...

(from:to:step)

any of them are optional

(:to:step)
(from::step)
(from:to)

then the negative indexing just needs you to add the length of the string to the negative indices to understand it.

This works for me anyway...

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Well, a for loop in some other language, that is... –  David Perlman Sep 28 '11 at 16:14
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In python 2.7

Slicing in python

[a:b:c]

len = length of string, tuple or list

c -- default is +1. sign of c indicates forward or backward, absolute value of c indicates steps. Default is forward with step size 1. Positive means forward, negative means backward.

a -- when c is positive or blank, default is 0. when c is negative, default is -1.

b -- when c is positive or blank, default is len. when c is negative, default is -(len+1).

Understanding index assignment is very important.

In forward direction, starts at 0 and ends at len-1

In backward direction, starts at -1 and ends at -len

when you say [a:b:c] you are saying depending on sign of c (forward or backward), start at a and end at b ( excluding element at bth index). Use the indexing rule above and remember you will only find elements in this range

-len, -len+1, -len+2, ..., 0, 1, 2,3,4 , len -1

but this range continues in both directions infinitely

...,-len -2 ,-len-1,-len, -len+1, -len+2, ..., 0, 1, 2,3,4 , len -1, len, len +1, len+2 , ....

e.g.

             0    1    2   3    4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11         
             a    s    t   r    i   n   g    
    -9  -8  -7   -6   -5  -4   -3  -2  -1        

if your choice of a , b and c allows overlap with the range above as you traverse using rules for a,b,c above you will either get a list with elements (touched during traversal) or you will get an empty list.

One last thing: if a and b are equal , then also you get an empty list

>>> l1
[2, 3, 4]

>>> l1[:]
[2, 3, 4]

>>> l1[::-1] # a default is -1 , b default is -(len+1)
[4, 3, 2]

>>> l1[:-4:-1] # a default is -1
[4, 3, 2]

>>> l1[:-3:-1] # a default is -1 
[4, 3]

>>> l1[::] # c default is +1, so a default is 0, b default is len
[2, 3, 4]

>>> l1[::-1] # c is -1 , so a default is -1 and b default is -(len+1)
[4, 3, 2]


>>> l1[-100:-200:-1] # interesting
[]

>>> l1[-1:-200:-1] # interesting
[4, 3, 2]


>>> l1[-1:5:1]
[4]

>>> l1[-1:-1:1]
[]


>>> l1[-1:5:1] # interesting
[4]


>>> l1[1:-7:1]
[]

>>> l1[1:-7:-1] # interesting
[3, 2]
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index:
      ------------>
  0   1   2   3   4
+---+---+---+---+---+
| a | b | c | d | e |
+---+---+---+---+---+
  0  -4  -3  -2  -1
      <------------

slice:
    <---------------|
|--------------->   
:   1   2   3   4   :
+---+---+---+---+---+
| a | b | c | d | e |
+---+---+---+---+---+
:  -4  -3  -2  -1   :
|--------------->   
    <---------------|

hope this will help you to model the list in Python

reference:http://wiki.python.org/moin/MovingToPythonFromOtherLanguages

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I use the "an index points between elements" method of thinking about it myself, but one way of describing it which sometimes helps others get it is this:

mylist[X:Y]

X is the index of the first element you want.
Y is the index of the first element you don't want.

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I find it easier to remember how it's works, then I can figure out any specific start/stop/step combination.

It's instructive to understand range() first:

def range(start=0, stop, step=1):  # illegal syntax, but that's the effect
    i = start
    while (i < stop if step > 0 else i > stop):
        yield i
        i += step

Begin from start, increment by step, do not reach stop. Very simple.

The thing to remember about negative step is that stop is always the excluded end, whether it's higher or lower. If you want same slice in opposite order, it's much cleaner to do the reversal separately: e.g. 'abcde'[1:-2][::-1] slices off one char from left, two from right, then reverses. (See also reversed().)

Sequence slicing is same, except it first normalizes negative indexes, and can never go outside the sequence:

def this_is_how_slicing_works(seq, start=None, stop=None, step=1):
    if start is None:
        start = (0 if step > 0 else len(seq)-1)
    elif start < 0:
        start += len(seq)
    if stop is None:
        stop = (len(seq) if step > 0 else -1)  # really -1, not last element
    elif stop < 0:
        stop += len(seq)
    for i in range(start, stop, step):
        if 0 <= i < len(seq):
            yield seq[i]

Don't worry about the is None details - just remember that omitting start and/or stop always does the right thing to give you the whole sequence.

Normalizing negative indexes first allows start and/or stop to be counted from the end independently: 'abcde'[1:-2] == 'abcde'[1:3] == 'bc' despite range(1,-2) == []. The normalization is sometimes thought of as "modulo the length" but note it adds the length just once: e.g. 'abcde'[-53:42] is just the whole string.

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You can also use slice assignment to remove one or more elements from a list:

r = [1, 'blah', 9, 8, 2, 3, 4]
>>> r[1:4] = []
>>> r
[1, 2, 3, 4]
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Python slicing notation:

a[start:end:step]
  • For start and end, negative values are interpreted as being relative to the end of the sequence.
  • Positive indices for end indicate the position after the last element to be included.
  • Blank values are defaulted as follows: [+0:-0:1].
  • Using a negative step reverses the interpretation of start and end

The notation extends to (numpy) matrices and multidimensional arrays. For example, to slice entire columns you can use:

m[::,0:2:] ## slice the first two columns

Slices hold references, not copies, of the array elements. If you want to make a separate copy an array, you can use deepcopy().

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This is just for some extra info... Consider the list below

>>> l=[12,23,345,456,67,7,945,467]

Another trick for reversing a list may be :

>>> l[len(l):-len(l)-1:-1]
[467, 945, 7, 67, 456, 345, 23, 12]

>>> l[:-len(l)-1:-1]
[467, 945, 7, 67, 456, 345, 23, 12]

>>> l[len(l)::-1]
[467, 945, 7, 67, 456, 345, 23, 12]

>>> l[::-1]
[467, 945, 7, 67, 456, 345, 23, 12]
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As a general rule, writing code with a lot of hardcoded index values leads to a readability and maintenance mess. For example, if you come back to the code a year later, you’ll look at it and wonder what you were thinking when you wrote it. The solution shown is simply a way of more clearly stating what your code is actually doing. In general, the built-in slice() creates a slice object that can be used anywhere a slice is allowed. For example:

>>> items = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]
>>> a = slice(2, 4)
>>> items[2:4]
[2, 3]
>>> items[a]
[2, 3]
>>> items[a] = [10,11]
>>> items
[0, 1, 10, 11, 4, 5, 6]
>>> del items[a]
>>> items
[0, 1, 4, 5, 6]

If you have a slice instance s, you can get more information about it by looking at its s.start, s.stop, and s.step attributes, respectively. For example:

>>> a = slice(10, 50, 2)
>>> a.start
10
>>> a.stop
50
>>> a.step
2
>>>
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Do you mean http://www.python.org/doc/2.5.2/ref/slicings.html#tok-slicing ?

Or http://docs.python.org/reference/expressions.html#grammar-token-slicing ?

Or http://docs.python.org/3.0/library/functions.html#slice

Or something else?

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well, it's probably in there somewhere... this is a bit too concise. I guess what I am really looking for is some help coming to grips with it rather than the full definition of the grammar. –  Simon Feb 3 '09 at 22:38
    
gulp, and now two other references... –  Simon Feb 3 '09 at 22:40
    
Different versions -- 2.5, 2.6, 3.0 -- three views of the same underlying thing. –  S.Lott Feb 3 '09 at 22:53
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to get a certain piece of an iterable(like a list), here is an example:

variable[number1:number2]

in this, a positive number for number 1 is how many components you take off the front. a negative number is the exact opposite, how many you keep from the end. A positive number for number 2 indicates how many components you intend to keep from the beginning, and a negative is how many you intend to take off from the end. This is somewhat counter intuitive, but you are correct in supposing that list slicing is extremely useful.

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What distinctive new information does this answer provide? When a question has as many answers as this one does, especially highly voted answers, a new answer needs to provide distinctive new information to be worth adding. See also Is it worthwhile to finish your answer if multiple good answers are given while you're typing yours? on Meta Stack Overflow. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '13 at 4:16
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protected by Jon Clements Feb 8 '13 at 9:20

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