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public ArrayList InputBuffer
{
    get { lock (this.in_buffer) { return this.in_buffer; } }
}

is this.in_buffer locked during a call to InputBuffer.Clear?

or does the property simply lock the in_buffer object while it's getting the reference to it; the lock exits, and then that reference is used to Clear?

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Upon further reflection, I think that Jon Skeet's answer is actually the most correct one -- as much as I'd like mine to be :P –  Olhovsky Feb 23 '11 at 15:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In addition to what others have said about the scope of the lock, remember that you aren't locking the object, you are only locking based on the object instance named.

Common practice is to have a separate lock mutex as Jon Skeet exemplifies.

If you must guarantee synchronized execution while the collection is being cleared, expose a method that clears the collection, have clients call that, and don't expose your underlying implementation details. (Which is good practice anyway - look up encapsulation.)

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No, the property locks the reference while it's getting that reference. Pretty pointless, to be honest... this is more common:

private readonly object mutex = new object();
private Foo foo = ...;

public Foo Foo
{
    get
    {
        lock(mutex)
        {
            return foo;
        }
    }
}

That lock would only cover the property access itself, and wouldn't provide any protection for operations performed with the Foo. However, it's not the same as not having the lock at all, because so long as the variable is only written while holding the same lock, it ensures that any time you read the Foo property, you're accessing the most recent value of the property... without the lock, there's no memory barrier and you could get a "stale" result.

This is pretty weak, but worth knowing about.

Personally I try to make very few types thread-safe, and those tend to have more appropriate operations... but if you wanted to write code which did modify and read properties from multiple threads, this is one way of doing so. Using volatile can help too, but the semantics of it are hideously subtle.

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but doesn't the mutex lock exit at the return? IE, the mutex wouldn't be locked during the foo.Clear. –  Rancur3p1c Feb 23 '11 at 15:22
3  
Note that this is not really protecting anything. foo can be changed elsewhere, and foo itself isn't locked. References are word-sized and so accessed atomically anyway. This is why the ISyncRoot stuff kind of went away after 1.1, because usually you need to lock on the broader operation level instead. –  Mark Sowul Feb 23 '11 at 15:27
    
@Mark: "Accessed atomically" != accessed in a volatile manner. This would be used to make sure you always got the "latest" value for foo. Will edit to make that clear. –  Jon Skeet Feb 23 '11 at 15:31
    
+1. This answer makes the most sense. Note that the buffer object should only be accessed within locks on the mutex object. Edit: I see that you've added that clarification to your answer. –  Olhovsky Feb 23 '11 at 15:41
    
If memory barriers are all you're after here, wouldn't Interlocked be slightly better here (for the types it supports)? Or perhaps even Thread.MemoryBarrier ? I realize low level locking is dangerous and subtle, but for this specific property encapsulation need wouldn't it be simple enough ? –  Ohad Schneider Feb 12 '12 at 13:51

The object is locked inside the braces of the lock call, and then it is unlocked.

In this case the only code in the lock call is return this.in_buffer;.

So in this case, the in_buffer is not locked during a call to InputBuffer.Clear.

One solution to your problem, using extension methods, is as follows.

private readonly object _bufLock;
class EMClass{
    public static void LockedClear(this ArrayList a){
        lock(_bufLock){
            a.Clear();
        }
    }
}

Now when you do:

a.LockedClear();

The Clear call will be done in a lock.

You must ensure that the buffer is only accessed inside _bufLocks.

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so the only way to lock during the clear is to explicitly call it outside the property? aka lock(property) {property.Clear}; –  Rancur3p1c Feb 23 '11 at 15:24
1  
Well, you could write an extension method for Clear, and put the lock inside of that method. –  Olhovsky Feb 23 '11 at 15:27
1  
In other words, have LockedClear(), which contains something like lock(buffer){ buffer.Clear(); } inside. You are calling buffer.Clear() anyway, so instead you could call buffer.LockedClear(). –  Olhovsky Feb 23 '11 at 15:27

As already answered this form of locking is not helpful.

public ArrayList InputBuffer
{
    get { lock (this.in_buffer) { return this.in_buffer; } }
}

Because it only locks the reference to the ArrayList, not the ArrayList itself. The design of lock(x) { } can be a bit misleading. It does not change (lock) the state of x in any way.

What you seem to need is:

private ArrayList _inBuffer;
private object _bufferLock;

public object GetItem(int x)
{
     lock (_bufferLock) { return _inBuffer[x]; }
}

public void SetItem(int x, object value)
{
     lock (_bufferLock) { _inBuffer[x] = value; }
}

And similar methods around _inBuffer.Clear() etc.

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I'll give you +1 because your answer is more clear than Jon Skeet's initially was, but Jon did already provide this solution with his getter. –  Olhovsky Feb 23 '11 at 15:42
    
Personally, I like Java's choice of key word (synchronized(...)) better than C#'s lock(...), because it's much more clear what it actually does, but the semantics are the same in both languages. –  Michael Kjörling Feb 23 '11 at 15:57

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