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I have a bash script:


#!/bin/bash
JAVA_VERSION="1.6.0_17"
_STDOUT=`java -version`

if [ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]; then
        echo "Matched"
else
        echo "Not Matched"
fi

i get the result:

java version "1.6.0_17"
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (IcedTea6 1.7.5) (rhel-1.16.b17.el5-x86_64)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.0-b16, mixed mode)
t4.sh: line 8: [: 1.6.0_17: unary operator expected
Not Matched

How would i match $JAVA_VERSION with $_STDOUT when $_STDOUT has multiple lines

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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Use quotes.

#!/bin/bash
JAVA_VERSION="1.6.0_17"
_STDOUT=`java -version`

if [ "$JAVA_VERSION" = "$_STDOUT" ]; then
        echo "Matched"
else
        echo "Not Matched"
fi
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i just noticed also "$JAVA_VERSION"="$_STDOUT" instead of "$JAVA_VERSION" = "$_STDOUT" but the rest works, thanks –  kamal Feb 23 '11 at 17:31
    
@kamal This may have prevented the unary operator expected problem but this script certainly does not do what you intend, quotes or not. –  SiegeX Feb 23 '11 at 17:41

You have a few problems.

  1. It appears java -version puts its output on STDERR, not STDOUT, so you'll have to redirect STDERR to STDOUT to parse it.
  2. You need to match the double quotes literally. With JAVA_VERSION="1.6.0_17" the shell will remove the quotes, you can wrap the double quotes in single quotes to make them literal.
  3. Finally, if you're going to use bash you should be using [[ ]] and not [ ]. The latter is actually a synonym to the test builtin and the former is native syntax that allows for more capability; one of which is you don't need to quote the variables inside.

.

#!/bin/bash

JAVA_VERSION='"1.6.0_17"'
_STDOUT=$(java -version 2>&1 | awk 'NR==1{print $3}')

if [[ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]]; then
  echo "Matched"
else
  echo "Not Matched"
fi

Proof of Concept

$ java -version
java version "1.6.0_20"
Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_20-b02)
Java HotSpot(TM) Client VM (build 16.3-b01, mixed mode, sharing)

$ JAVA_VERSION='"1.6.0_20"'; _STDOUT=$(java -version 2>&1 | awk 'NR==1{print $3}'); if [[ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]]; then echo "Matched"; else echo "Not Matched"; fi
Matched

$ JAVA_VERSION='"1.6.0_19"'; _STDOUT=$(java -version 2>&1 | awk 'NR==1{print $3}'); if [[ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]]; then echo "Matched"; else echo "Not Matched"; fi
Not Matched
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Actually, it's still good to quote variables in [[ ]]; for instance, in [[ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]], the contents of _STDOUT will be treated as a glob pattern, which may not be what you wanted. Rather than trying to keep track of cases like this, I just follow the policy of double-quoting everything unless there's a specific reason not to. –  Gordon Davisson Feb 23 '11 at 21:28

You can use Bash's inbuilt comparison checker to see if a string is contained within another string. So you don't need to pipe into awk or cut.

JAVA_VERSION=1.6.0_17
_STDOUT=`java -version 2>&1`
if [[ $_STDOUT == *$JAVA_VERSION* ]]; then
     echo "Matched"
else
     echo "Not Matched"
fi
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The problem is not of having multiple lines -- even if the output had appeared in a single line, it wouldn't have matched. You made a good try, but what that code does is like comparing an apple with a basket of fruits. So, we need to isolate the apple from that basket :)

This is how we do it:

Note: Corrected the code as per SiegeX's comments

#!/bin/bash
JAVA_VERSION="1.6.0_17"
_STDOUT=`java -version 2>&1 | grep "java version" | cut -d'"' -f2` # Just extract the version

if [[ "$JAVA_VERSION" = "$_STDOUT" ]]; then
        echo "Matched"
else
        echo "Not Matched"
fi
share|improve this answer
    
A few comments 1) You'll need to redirect stderr first because that's where java -version outputs to. 2) Use $() rather than backticks for command substitution because the latter has been deprecated –  SiegeX Feb 23 '11 at 17:43
    
@SiegeX Cool! I don't have Java installed here, so couldn't verify. However, most of the UNIX/Linux utilites (atleast the GNU ones) do print their version on STDOUT. –  Barun Feb 23 '11 at 18:10
    
somehow i am getting incorrect answer with the bash script. The one that works is #!/bin/bash JAVA_VERSION='"1.6.0_17"' _STDOUT=$(java -version 2>&1 | awk 'NR==1{print $3}') if [[ $JAVA_VERSION = $_STDOUT ]]; then echo "JDK installed Correctly with: " $JAVA_VERSION else echo "jdk version Not correct" fi –  kamal Feb 25 '11 at 20:46

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