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def attrs(**kwds):
      def decorate(f):
          for k in kwds:
              setattr(f, k, kwds[k])
          return f
      return decorate

@attrs(argument_types=(int, int,), returns=int)
def add(a, b):
      return a + b 

Here I need the add() can be with the ability to show its acceptable parameter type. but can I do something like this in runtime?

ladd=[]
for x in range(0,10):

      @attrs(argument_types=int, returns=int,default_parameter1 = x) 
      exp =  lambda : add(a,x)  
      ladd.append(exp)

or

ladd=[]
for x in range(0,10):

      @attrs(argument_types=int, returns=int,default_parameter1 = x) 
      addx = functools.partial(add, 2)  
      ladd.append(addx)

I need those function can be generated runtime with the "decoratored" parameter bind either

Thanks for any hint.

Rgs,

KC

well, here is the error information, i think above code can not work then i never try to paste to the python to test it...

>>> ladd=[]
>>> for x in range(0,10):
...     @attrs(argument_types=int, returns=int,default_parameter1 = x) 
...     exp =  lambda : add(a,x)  
  File "<stdin>", line 3
    exp =  lambda : add(a,x)  
      ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
>>>     ladd.append(exp)
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    ladd.append(exp)
    ^
IndentationError: unexpected indent
>>> 
share|improve this question
    
When you tried it, what errors did you get? –  S.Lott Feb 23 '11 at 18:04
1  
@S.Lott: While error messages are very useful in general and should be included when in doubt, anyone with enough Python knowledge to answer this should know very well that this is a plain ol' syntax error. –  delnan Feb 23 '11 at 18:06
    
@delnan: The question was not for "anyone with enough Python knowledge to answer" but for @user478514 to update the question with more information, perhaps doing some real debugging work on their own. You're right, of course, but sometimes people are helped by simply providing documentation of what they're seeing. –  S.Lott Feb 23 '11 at 18:08
    
@S.Lott: thanks for point out, I think you means I should test it before I paste here. in this case I do not think above "code" may works so I never test it, actually, that is just a "what-if" idea in my mind. –  user478514 Feb 23 '11 at 18:32
1  
@user478514: Confused is not "what if". Confused means you have code which confuses you. "What if" is silly because it's much easier to actually do something with the code and actually see what happens that do anything else. Here's the hint: try things first. –  S.Lott Feb 23 '11 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Decorator syntax is merely syntactic sugar, albeit one that directs people's thoughts into interesting directions.

@expr
def f(...):
    ...

is identical to

def f(...):
    ...
f = expr(f)

So you can just use attrs(argument_types=..., ...)(lambda: ...).

share|improve this answer

The @ syntax is just syntactic sugar for calling the decorator with the next function as it's argument. This means that

@deco
def func(): pass

is the same as

def func(): pass
func = deco(func)

So what you want is simply:

ladd=[]

for x in range(0,10):    
      deco = attrs(argument_types=int, returns=int,default_parameter1 = x) 
      addx = functools.partial(add, 2)
      # append the "decorated" function
      ladd.append(deco(addx))
share|improve this answer
    
@OP: as Jochen's code shows, decorators are just functions that happen to take and return other functions. –  tangentstorm Feb 23 '11 at 18:06

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