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I'm learning about async/await, and ran into a situation where I need to call an async method synchronously. How can I do that?

Async method:

public async Task<Customers> GetCustomers()
{
    return await Service.GetCustomersAsync();
}

Normal usage:

public async void GetCustomers()
{
    customerList = await GetCustomers();
}

I've tried using the following:

Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers();
task.Wait()

Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers();
task.RunSynchronously();

Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers();
while(task.Status != TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)

I also tried a suggestion from here, however it doesn't work when the dispatcher is in a suspended state.

public static void WaitWithPumping(this Task task) 
{
        if (task == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(“task”);
        var nestedFrame = new DispatcherFrame();
        task.ContinueWith(_ => nestedFrame.Continue = false);
        Dispatcher.PushFrame(nestedFrame);
        task.Wait();
}

EDIT

Per Gaearon's request, here is the exception and stack trace from calling RunSynchronously:

System.InvalidOperationException

Message: RunSynchronously may not be called on a task unbound to a delegate.

InnerException: null

Source: mscorlib

StackTrace:

          at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.InternalRunSynchronously(TaskScheduler scheduler)
   at System.Threading.Tasks.Task.RunSynchronously()
   at MyApplication.CustomControls.Controls.MyCustomControl.CreateAvailablePanelList() in C:\Documents and Settings\...\MyApplication.CustomControls\Controls\MyCustomControl.xaml.cs:line 638
   at MyApplication.CustomControls.Controls.MyCustomControl.get_AvailablePanels() in C:\Documents and Settings\...\MyApplication.CustomControls\Controls\MyCustomControl.xaml.cs:line 233
   at MyApplication.CustomControls.Controls.MyCustomControl.<CreateOpenPanelList>b__36(DesktopPanel panel) in C:\Documents and Settings\...\MyApplication.CustomControls\Controls\MyCustomControl.xaml.cs:line 597
   at System.Collections.Generic.List`1.ForEach(Action`1 action)
   at MyApplication.CustomControls.Controls.MyCustomControl.<CreateOpenPanelList>d__3b.MoveNext() in C:\Documents and Settings\...\MyApplication.CustomControls\Controls\MyCustomControl.xaml.cs:line 625
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.TaskAwaiter.<>c__DisplayClass7.<TrySetContinuationForAwait>b__1(Object state)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(Object source, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.InvokeImpl()
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.InvokeInSecurityContext(Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.runTryCode(Object userData)
   at System.Runtime.CompilerServices.RuntimeHelpers.ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup(TryCode code, CleanupCode backoutCode, Object userData)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.RunInternal(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Windows.Threading.DispatcherOperation.Invoke()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.ProcessQueue()
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.WndProcHook(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndWrapper.WndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam, Boolean& handled)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.DispatcherCallbackOperation(Object o)
   at System.Windows.Threading.ExceptionWrapper.InternalRealCall(Delegate callback, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Internal.Threading.ExceptionFilterHelper.TryCatchWhen(Object source, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs, Delegate catchHandler)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.InvokeImpl(DispatcherPriority priority, TimeSpan timeout, Delegate method, Object args, Int32 numArgs)
   at MS.Win32.HwndSubclass.SubclassWndProc(IntPtr hwnd, Int32 msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam)
   at MS.Win32.UnsafeNativeMethods.DispatchMessage(MSG& msg)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.PushFrameImpl(DispatcherFrame frame)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.PushFrame(DispatcherFrame frame)
   at System.Windows.Threading.Dispatcher.Run()
   at System.Windows.Application.RunDispatcher(Object ignore)
   at System.Windows.Application.RunInternal(Window window)
   at System.Windows.Application.Run(Window window)
   at System.Windows.Application.Run()
   at MyApplication.App.Main() in C:\Documents and Settings\...\MyApplication\obj\Debug\App.g.cs:line 50
   at System.AppDomain._nExecuteAssembly(RuntimeAssembly assembly, String[] args)
   at System.AppDomain.ExecuteAssembly(String assemblyFile, Evidence assemblySecurity, String[] args)
   at Microsoft.VisualStudio.HostingProcess.HostProc.RunUsersAssembly()
   at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart_Context(Object state)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean ignoreSyncCtx)
   at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)
   at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart()
share|improve this question
6  
The best answer to the question "How can I call an async method synchronously" is "don't". There are hacks to try to force it to work, but they all have very subtle pitfalls. Instead, back up and fix the code that makes you "need" to do this. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 15 '13 at 17:24
1  
@Stephen Cleary Absolutely agree, but sometimes its simply unavoidable, such as when your code is dependent on some 3rd party API that does not use async/await. In addition, if binding to WPF properties when using MVVM, its literally impossible to use async/await as this is not supported on properties. –  Contango Sep 12 at 17:43
1  
@Contago: There are always better alternatives. E.g., creating a data-bindable task wrapper. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 12 at 23:14
    
Not true. Sometimes you're just dealt a shitty hand. I'm stuck with a very old WF workflow that invokes C# code. The C# code now needs to be upgraded to use async/await but this breaks the WF workflow. And, unfortunately, it just isn't possible to update the WF code. –  MetaFight 3 hours ago

14 Answers 14

up vote 91 down vote accepted
+50

Here's a workaround I found that works for all cases (including suspended dispatchers). It's not my code and I'm still working to fully understand it, but it does work.

It can be called using:

customerList = AsyncHelpers.RunSync<List<Customer>>(() => GetCustomers());

Code is from here

public static class AsyncHelpers
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Execute's an async Task<T> method which has a void return value synchronously
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="task">Task<T> method to execute</param>
    public static void RunSync(Func<Task> task)
    {
        var oldContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;
        var synch = new ExclusiveSynchronizationContext();
        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(synch);
        synch.Post(async _ =>
        {
            try
            {
                await task();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                synch.InnerException = e;
                throw;
            }
            finally
            {
                synch.EndMessageLoop();
            }
        }, null);
        synch.BeginMessageLoop();

        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(oldContext);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Execute's an async Task<T> method which has a T return type synchronously
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T">Return Type</typeparam>
    /// <param name="task">Task<T> method to execute</param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    public static T RunSync<T>(Func<Task<T>> task)
    {
        var oldContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;
        var synch = new ExclusiveSynchronizationContext();
        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(synch);
        T ret = default(T);
        synch.Post(async _ =>
        {
            try
            {
                ret = await task();
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                synch.InnerException = e;
                throw;
            }
            finally
            {
                synch.EndMessageLoop();
            }
        }, null);
        synch.BeginMessageLoop();
        SynchronizationContext.SetSynchronizationContext(oldContext);
        return ret;
    }

    private class ExclusiveSynchronizationContext : SynchronizationContext
    {
        private bool done;
        public Exception InnerException { get; set; }
        readonly AutoResetEvent workItemsWaiting = new AutoResetEvent(false);
        readonly Queue<Tuple<SendOrPostCallback, object>> items =
            new Queue<Tuple<SendOrPostCallback, object>>();

        public override void Send(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException("We cannot send to our same thread");
        }

        public override void Post(SendOrPostCallback d, object state)
        {
            lock (items)
            {
                items.Enqueue(Tuple.Create(d, state));
            }
            workItemsWaiting.Set();
        }

        public void EndMessageLoop()
        {
            Post(_ => done = true, null);
        }

        public void BeginMessageLoop()
        {
            while (!done)
            {
                Tuple<SendOrPostCallback, object> task = null;
                lock (items)
                {
                    if (items.Count > 0)
                    {
                        task = items.Dequeue();
                    }
                }
                if (task != null)
                {
                    task.Item1(task.Item2);
                    if (InnerException != null) // the method threw an exeption
                    {
                        throw new AggregateException("AsyncHelpers.Run method threw an exception.", InnerException);
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    workItemsWaiting.WaitOne();
                }
            }
        }

        public override SynchronizationContext CreateCopy()
        {
            return this;
        }
    }
}

Edit: Updated code to include exception handling that John posted in the original forum thread

share|improve this answer
72  
I am the author of this code. It has a bug: it swallows any exception thrown by the called method. I updated the code at the original forum post (linked above.) –  John Melville Sep 1 '11 at 1:42
5  
For some background on how this works, Stephen Toub (Mr Parallel) wrote a series of posts about this. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 –  Cameron MacFarland Feb 8 '13 at 16:29
3  
I updated John's code to work without wrapping tasks in lambdas: github.com/tejacques/AsyncBridge. Essentially you work with async blocks with the using statement. Anything inside a using block happens asynchronously, with a wait at the end. The downside is that you need to unwrap the task yourself in a callback, but it's still fairly elegant, especially if you need to call several async functions at once. –  Tom Jacques Jun 25 '13 at 19:47
8  
This code is not a general-purpose solution for synchronously calling an asynchronous method. It's similar to (but not exactly like) the nested loop approach described by Stephen Toub as "far from an ideal solution". A better solution is to always allow async code to be asynchronous; I have a blog series on various pain points when combining async and OOP that describes better solutions. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 5 '13 at 15:56
3  
@StephenCleary Although I generally agree with you that the code should be async all the way down, sometimes you find yourself in an infeasible situation where one has to force it as a synchronous call. Basically, my situation is that all my data access code is in async fashion. I needed to build a sitemap based on the sitemap and the third party library I was using was MvcSitemap. Now when one is extending it via the DynamicNodeProviderBase base class, one cannot declare it as a async method. Either I had to replace with a new library, or just call a synchronous op. –  justin.lovell Jan 23 at 6:56

.Net 4.5

Just use this:

// For Task<T>: will block until the task is completed...
var result = task.Result; 

// For Task (not Task<T>):
task2.RunSynchronously();

TaskAwaiter Task<T>.Result Task.RunSynchronously


.Net 4.0

Use this:

var x = (IAsyncResult)task;
task.Start();

x.AsyncWaitHandle.WaitOne();

...or this:

task.Start();
task.Wait();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for task.Result –  ErikTJ May 13 '13 at 16:37
1  
I also use task.Result - anyone got any issues with this approach? –  Carlos P Jul 9 '13 at 17:35
9  
.Result can produce a deadlock in certain scenario's –  Jordy Langen Aug 22 '13 at 19:17
24  
Result can easily cause deadlock in async code, as I describe on my blog. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 5 '13 at 15:58
1  
task.Wait() sometimes does not work "synchronously". This introduces some very nasty bugs –  Cortlendt Feb 28 at 6:38

If I am reading your question right - the code that wants the synchronous call to an async method is executing on a suspended dispatcher thread. And you want to actually synchronously block that thread until the async method is completed.

Async methods in C# 5 are powered by effectively chopping the method into pieces under the hood, and returning a Task that can track the overall completion of the whole shabang. However, how the chopped up methods execute can depend on the type of the expression passed to the await operator.

Most of the time, you'll be using await on an expression of type Task. Task's implementation of the await pattern is "smart" in that it defers to the SynchronizationContext, which basically causes the following to happen:

  1. If the thread entering the await is on a Dispatcher or WinForms message loop thread, it ensures that the chunks of the async method occurs as part of the processing of the message queue.
  2. If the thread entering the await is on a thread pool thread, then the remaining chunks of the async method occur anywhere on the thread pool.

That's why you're probably running into problems - the async method implementation is trying to run the rest on the Dispatcher - even though it's suspended.

.... backing up! ....

I have to ask the question, why are you trying to synchronously block on an async method? Doing so would defeat the purpose on why the method wanted to be called asynchronously. In general, when you start using await on a Dispatcher or UI method, you will want to turn your entire UI flow async. For example, if your callstack was something like the following:

  1. [Top] WebRequest.GetResponse()
  2. YourCode.HelperMethod()
  3. YourCode.AnotherMethod()
  4. YourCode.EventHandlerMethod()
  5. [UI Code].Plumbing() - WPF or WinForms Code
  6. [Message Loop] - WPF or WinForms Message Loop

Then once the code has been transformed to use async, you'll typically end up with

  1. [Top] WebRequest.GetResponseAsync()
  2. YourCode.HelperMethodAsync()
  3. YourCode.AnotherMethodAsync()
  4. YourCode.EventHandlerMethodAsync()
  5. [UI Code].Plumbing() - WPF or WinForms Code
  6. [Message Loop] - WPF or WinForms Message Loop

Actually Answering

The AsyncHelpers class above actually works because it behaves like a nested message loop, but it installs its own parallel mechanic to the Dispatcher rather than trying to execute on the Dispatcher itself. That's one workaround for your problem.

Another workaround is to execute your async method on a threadpool thread, and then wait for it to complete. Doing so is easy - you can do it with the following snippet:

var customerList = TaskEx.RunEx(GetCustomers).Result;

The final API will be Task.Run(...), but with the CTP you'll need the Ex suffixes (explanation here).

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the detailed explanation, however TaskEx.RunEx(GetCustomers).Result hangs the application when it gets run on a suspended dispatcher thread. Also, the GetCustomers() method is normally run async, however in one situation it needs to run synchronously, so I was looking for a way to do that without building a sync version of the method. –  Rachel Feb 25 '11 at 14:39
    
+1 for "why are you trying to synchronously block on an async method?" There is always a way to properly use async methods; nested loops should certainly be avoided. –  Stephen Cleary Sep 5 '13 at 15:59

Why not create a call like:

Service.GetCustomers();

that isn't async.

share|improve this answer
2  
That's going to be what I do if I can't get this working... create a Sync version in addition to an Async version –  Rachel Feb 23 '11 at 18:49

It's much simpler to run the task on the thread pool, rather than trying to trick the scheduler to run it synchronously. That way you can be sure that it won't deadlock. Performance is affected because of the context switch.

Task<MyResult> DoSomethingAsync() { ... }

// Starts the asynchronous task on a thread-pool thread.
// Returns a proxy to the original task.
Task<MyResult> task = Task.Run(() => DoSomethingAsync());

// Will block until the task is completed...
MyResult result = task.Result; 
share|improve this answer
    
And if the task is void (without result)? –  J. Lennon Oct 6 '13 at 23:17
    
Then you call task.Wait(). The data type is simply Task. –  Michael L Perry Apr 9 at 14:51
    
Let's assume that DoSomethingAsync() is long-running async method as whole (internally it awaits a long-running task), but it yields back a flow control to its caller quickly, thus the lambda argument work ends also quickly. The result of Tusk.Run() may Task<Task> or Task<Task<>>, so you are awaiting a result of outer task which is completed quickly, but inner task ( due to awaiting long-running job in async method) is still running. Conclusions are that we probably need to use Unwrap() approach (as was done in @J.Lennon post) to achieve synchronous behaviour of async method. –  sgnsajgon Sep 13 at 9:33

I've faced it a few times, mostly in unit testing or in a windows service development. Currently I always use this feature:

        var runSync = Task.Factory.StartNew(new Func<Task>(async () =>
        {
            Trace.WriteLine("Task runSync Start");
            await TaskEx.Delay(2000); // Simulates a method that returns a task and
                                      // inside it is possible that there
                                      // async keywords or anothers tasks
            Trace.WriteLine("Task runSync Completed");
        })).Unwrap();
        Trace.WriteLine("Before runSync Wait");
        runSync.Wait();
        Trace.WriteLine("After runSync Waited");

It's simple, easy and I had no problems.

share|improve this answer

In your code, your first wait for task to execute but you haven't started it so it waits indefinitely. Try this:

Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers();
task.RunSynchronously();

Edit:

You say that you get an exception. Please post more details, including stack trace.
Mono contains the following test case:

[Test]
public void ExecuteSynchronouslyTest ()
{
        var val = 0;
        Task t = new Task (() => { Thread.Sleep (100); val = 1; });
        t.RunSynchronously ();

        Assert.AreEqual (1, val);
}

Check if this works for you. If it does not, though very unlikely, you might have some odd build of Async CTP. If it does work, you might want to examine what exactly the compiler generates and how Task instantiation is different from this sample.

Edit #2:

I checked with Reflector that the exception you described occurs when m_action is null. This is kinda odd, but I'm no expert on Async CTP. As I said, you should decompile your code and see how exactly Task is being instantiated any how come its m_action is null.


P.S. What's the deal with the occasional downvotes? Care to elaborate?

share|improve this answer
    
I adjusted my question to make the code I had attempted a bit clearer. RunSynchronously returns an error of RunSynchronously may not be called on a task unbound to a delegate. Google is no help since all the results for that are in chinese... –  Rachel Feb 23 '11 at 18:51
    
I edited my reply. –  Dan Feb 23 '11 at 19:02
    
I think the difference is that I don't create the Task and then try to run it. Instead, the task is created by the async method when the await keyword is used. The exception posted in my earlier comment is the exception I get, although it is one of the few that I cannot Google and find a cause or resolution for. –  Rachel Feb 23 '11 at 19:40
    
async and async keywords are nothing more than syntax sugar. Compiler generates code to create Task<Customer> in GetCustomers() so that's where I would look first. As for exception, you only posted exception message, which is useless without exception type and stack trace. Call exception's ToString() method and post output in the question. –  Dan Feb 23 '11 at 19:44
1  
@gaearon I think you had got downvotes because your post is not applicable to question. The discussion is about async-await methods, not about simple Task-returning methods. Moreover, in my opinion, async-await mechanism is a syntax sugar, but not so trivial - there is continuation , context capturing, local context resuming, enhanced local exceptions handling, and more. Then, you shouldn't invoke RunSynchronously method on result of the async method, because by definition asynchronous method should return Task that is currently at least scheduled, and more than once is in the running state. –  sgnsajgon Sep 15 at 19:01

Just a little note - this approach:

Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers();
task.Wait()

works for WinRT.

EDIT: I am in stuck. This answer has been taken 2 down vote without any comments. I rechecked this solution and it works. What is wrong? I guess that somebody didn't understand full picture, so let me explain:

private void TestMethod()
{
    Task<Customer> task = GetCustomers(); // call async method as sync and get task as result
    task.Wait(); // wait executing the method
    var customer = task.Result; // get's result.
    Debug.WriteLine(customer.Name); //print customer name
}
public class Customer
{
    public Customer()
    {
        new ManualResetEvent(false).WaitOne(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5));//wait 5 second (long term operation)
    }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}
private Task<Customer> GetCustomers()
{
    return Task.Run(() => new Customer
    {
        Name = "MyName"
    });
}

Moreover I mentioned that this approach works for Windows Store solutions only!

ONE MORE EDIT: This way isn't thread safe if you call your method inside of other async method (according to comments of @Servy)

share|improve this answer
    
I explained this solution, check EDIT section. –  RredCat Dec 16 '13 at 19:01
1  
This can very easily result in deadlocks when called in asynchronous situations. –  Servy Dec 16 '13 at 19:07
    
@Servy make sense. So as I get correct using Wait(timeOut) can help, right? –  RredCat Dec 16 '13 at 20:49
1  
Then you need to worry about having the timeout being reached when the operation isn't actually done, which is very bad, and also the time spent waiting until the timeout in the cases where it deadlocks (and in that case you're still continuing on when it's not done). So no, that doesn't fix the problem. –  Servy Dec 16 '13 at 20:50
    
@Servy Looks like I have to implement CancellationToken for my solution. –  RredCat Dec 16 '13 at 21:41
    private int GetSync()
    {
        try
        {
            ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
            int result = null;

            Parallel.Invoke(async () =>
            {
                result = await SomeCalcAsync(5+5);
                mre.Set();
            });

            mre.WaitOne();
            return result;
        }
        catch (Exception)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

This is working well for me

public static class TaskHelper
{
    public static void RunTaskSynchronously(this Task t)
    {
        var task = Task.Run(async () => await t);
        task.Wait();
    }

    public static T RunTaskSynchronously<T>(this Task<T> t)
    {
        T res = default(T);
        var task = Task.Run(async () => res = await t);
        task.Wait();
        return res;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You need to also use Task.Unwrap method, because your Task.Wait statement causes waiting for outer Task (created by Task.Run), not for inner await t Task passed as parameter of extension method. Your Task.Run method returns not Task<T>, but Task<Task<T>>. In some simple scenarios your solution may works because of TaskScheduler optimizations, for example using TryExecuteTaskInline method to execute Tasks within current thread during Wait operation .Please look at my comment to this answer. –  sgnsajgon Sep 15 at 18:45
    
That is not correct. The Task.Run will return Task<T>. See this overload msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh194918(v=vs.110).aspx –  Clement 2 days ago

You can use CoRoutines. See Caliburn.Micro implementation. I have a custom implementation here.

share|improve this answer
    
Please could you provide any example? –  sgnsajgon Sep 15 at 18:49

On wp8:

Wrap it:

Task GetCustomersSynchronously()
{
    Task t = new Task(async () =>
    {
        myCustomers = await GetCustomers();
    }
    t.RunSynchronously();
}

Call it:

GetCustomersSynchronously();
share|improve this answer
2  
Nope, this wont work, because the task does not await the delegate from the constructor (its a delegate and not a task..) –  Rico Suter Jul 29 '13 at 11:09

async/await introduces context sensitive grammar. A lot of confusion related to its use originates from this. I'm not sure if Microsoft has documented the context sensitive nature of these keyword pair. async/await used with Window message handlers can efficiently suspend and resume messages, whereas the same used in conjunction with free threads can efficiently parallelize tasks. Essentially, it relieves programmers of the burden of writing BeginInvoke or spawning and managing Task.

share|improve this answer

This answer is designed for anyone who is using WPF for .NET 4.5.

If you attempt to execute Task.Run() on the GUI thread, then task.Wait() will hang indefinitely, if you do not have the async keyword in your function definition.

This extension method solves the problem by checking to see if we are on the GUI thread, and if so, running the task on the WPF dispatcher thread.

This class can act as the glue between the async/await world and the non-async/await world, in situations where it is unavoidable, such as MVVM properties or dependencies on other APIs that do not use async/await.

/// <summary>
///     Intent: runs an async/await task synchronously. Designed for use with WPF.
///     Normally, under WPF, if task.Wait() is executed on the GUI thread without async
///     in the function signature, it will hang with a threading deadlock, this class 
///     solves that problem.
/// </summary>
public static class TaskHelper
{
    public static void MyRunTaskSynchronously(this Task task)
    {
        if (MyIfWpfDispatcherThread)
        {
            var result = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.InvokeAsync(async () => { await task; });
            result.Wait();
            if (result.Status != DispatcherOperationStatus.Completed)
            {
                throw new Exception("Error E99213. Task did not run to completion.");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            task.Wait();
            if (task.Status != TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)
            {
                throw new Exception("Error E33213. Task did not run to completion.");
            }
        }
    }

    public static T MyRunTaskSynchronously<T>(this Task<T> task)
    {       
        if (MyIfWpfDispatcherThread)
        {
            T res = default(T);
            var result = Dispatcher.CurrentDispatcher.InvokeAsync(async () => { res = await task; });
            result.Wait();
            if (result.Status != DispatcherOperationStatus.Completed)
            {
                throw new Exception("Error E89213. Task did not run to completion.");
            }
            return res;
        }
        else
        {
            T res = default(T);
            var result = Task.Run(async () => res = await task);
            result.Wait();
            if (result.Status != TaskStatus.RanToCompletion)
            {
                throw new Exception("Error E12823. Task did not run to completion.");
            }
            return res;
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     If the task is running on the WPF dispatcher thread.
    /// </summary>
    public static bool MyIfWpfDispatcherThread
    {
        get
        {
            return Application.Current.Dispatcher.CheckAccess();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could the downvoter care to explain why? –  Contango Sep 13 at 12:50

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