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How to make the same rewrite rule without using THE_REQUEST?

RewriteEngine On
# Rewrite multiple slashes with single slash after domain
RewriteCond %{THE_REQUEST} ^[A-Z]+\s//+(.*)\sHTTP/[0-9.]+$ [OR]
RewriteCond %{THE_REQUEST} ^[A-Z]+\s(.*/)/+\sHTTP/[0-9.]+$
RewriteRule .* http://%{HTTP_HOST}/%1 [R=301,L,NE]

Update: .htaccess location - www.domain.com/url/.htaceess
Rewrite action - www.domain.com//url/id rewrited to www.domain.com/url/id

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2  
I guess THE_REQUEST is the only one variable, that contains multiple preceding slashes. So the answer: No. –  Floern Feb 23 '11 at 20:40
    
Don't forget about ?queries – you probably don't want to remove slashes from them. –  aaz Feb 23 '11 at 22:21

2 Answers 2

How about this?

RewriteCond %{REQUEST_URI} ^(.)//(.)$ RewriteRule . %1/%2 [R=301,L]

Taken from here. (Unfortunately I'm unable to test it here).

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Your rewrite rule will not work when .htaccess will be in localhost/dir/.htaccess (localhost//dir/ will be returned the same). –  Binyamin Feb 23 '11 at 20:33
    
Unfortunately this doesn't match multiple slashes at the beginning of the URL like in http://domain.com///file.htm, because these slashes aren't contained in %{REQUEST_URI}... –  Floern Feb 23 '11 at 20:35
    
@Floern - You can check, my rule works fine, just I was wondering to make the same thing with REQUEST_URI and not THE_REQUEST. –  Binyamin Feb 23 '11 at 20:43
    
I'm curious - why don't you want to use THE_REQUEST if it does what you need? –  Danny Tuppeny Feb 23 '11 at 20:52
    
@DanTup - Danny Tuppeny - THE_REQUEST returns urlencode for non Latin urls, but I need to return urldecode. –  Binyamin Feb 24 '11 at 19:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems there are no solution without Apache %{THE_REQUEST}.

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