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I want to read a (basically a text file) file without an extension in Python 2.6. I have tried the following codes with the following errors..

for infile in glob.glob(os.path.join(path + "Bookmarks",'*')):
    review_file = open(infile,'r').read()
    print review_file

-> global name glob is not defined

f = open(path, "r")
text = f.readlines()
print text

-> Prints "x00\x00\x00\x00\x00\" etc, and this is not what is inside of this file.

Edit: -> The conents of the file, directly, is what I want, for example if the file had "023492034blackriver0brydonmccluskey" in it, it would (as of now) extract it with a bunch of binary values, whereas I only want the exacy contents. How would I do so?

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1  
glob.glob, ahh, lovely! – David Heffernan Feb 23 '11 at 19:05
1  
Open the file with a hex editor (or a decent text editor set to show non-printable characters). I bet you there are some NUL bytes in front of the text. – delnan Feb 23 '11 at 20:14
  1. If you want to use the glob module, you have to import it first:

    import glob
    for infile in glob.glob(os.path.join(path, '*')):
        review_file = open(infile,'r').read()
        print review_file
    
  2. Are you sure that your file does not contain the binary data you are getting?

share|improve this answer
    
I apologize if I made it appear differently in the first post, but I am attempting to read just straight text from the file (as I have now edited in the OP post). – Brydon McCluskey Feb 23 '11 at 19:25
    
I don't get it. If your file contains non-printable characters such as NULL bytes \x00, do you want to read those? Do you want to skip them until you find the first ASCII character? What output do you expect when you file.read() from a file that contains \x00\x00abc, other than \x00\x00abc? – Ferdinand Beyer Feb 24 '11 at 9:00

Have you tried it opening in text mode. But as per the documentation, 'r' should have been synonym of 'rt'.

f = open(path, "rt")
text = f.readlines()
print text
share|improve this answer
    
Should be the default. – delnan Feb 23 '11 at 19:02
    
Yes, Thanks, I just confirmed with the doc and made the changes to my answer – pyfunc Feb 23 '11 at 19:03
    
According to the documentation, there is no 't' mode. – Ferdinand Beyer Feb 23 '11 at 19:05
    
@Ferdinand Beyer: The reference is at docs.python.org/release/3.1.3/library/functions.html ('t' text mode (default)) for Python 3. I checked there are no release changes on this from 2.x version. – pyfunc Feb 23 '11 at 19:34
    
OK, sorry, I was only checking the docs for 2.7 (docs.python.org/release/2.7/library/functions.html#open). Nevertheless, using 'r' or 'rt' won't make any difference. – Ferdinand Beyer Feb 24 '11 at 9:06

1) you must import glob before using it

2) try 'rb' (read + binary) instead of 'r'

share|improve this answer
    
I have tried that but I still get a bunch of binary that I do not need. The conents of the file, directly, is what I want, for example if the file had "023492034blackriver0brydonmccluskey" in it, it would (as of now) extract it with a bunch of binary values, whereas I only want the exacy contents. How would I do so? – Brydon McCluskey Feb 23 '11 at 19:17
    
if you open the file with a text editor like pspad or notepad what do you get? text or binary? – joaquin Feb 23 '11 at 19:19
    
I get text, with some of those null value things. – Brydon McCluskey Feb 23 '11 at 19:20

Your current code looks at every file in the directory; if you only want files without an extension you should be using glob.glob('*.')

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I apologize, I have edited it to the following: path + "Bookmarks" – Brydon McCluskey Feb 23 '11 at 19:22

Based on the comments from the OP, the question needs to be rephrased along the lines of "I have a file with NULs in it, how do I get rid of them so I only see the text". To which the answer would be something like:

with open("myfile", 'rb') as f:
    data = f.read()
    clean_data = data.replace('\0', '')
    text = clean_data.decode('ascii') # Or other encoding, if text is not ASCII
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