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When I write the following code in C#:

SqlCeCommand command;
try
{
    // The command used to affect the data
    command = new SqlCeCommand
                  { 
                     // init code removed for brevity
                  };

    // Do stuff 
    // Do more stuff
}
finally
{
    if (command != null)
        command.Dispose();
}

Resharper complains on my check of command != null. It says that command may not be assigned (because it could fail some how in the constructing and still hit the try block).

So I change the declaration of command to be SqlCeCommand command = null; and everyone is happy.

But I am left wondering what the difference is?

And why doesn't it just default to null? Meaning: How does C# benefit from not just defaulting local variables to null?

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Because C++ did it seems like the only "real" answer. –  Vaccano Mar 1 '11 at 22:35
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6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Class field members get defaulted (value types each depending on its type, ref types to null) but local variables do not.

// Example 1:
SomeClass someObject;
if(x == y)
{
    someObject = new SomeClass();
}
someObject.someMethod();   //Error since it may not execute the if statements

// Example 2
SomeClass someObject;
someObject = new SomeClass();
someObject.someMethod();   //No Error

EDIT: This was designed to avoid C++ runtime errors which was causing the program to close unexpectedly (because of null pointers).

P.S: You may not downvote me when I talk about C# specs (I didn't make C# specs, I cheer this avoidance though).

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But why? Why not require both to be initialized or neither? –  Vaccano Feb 23 '11 at 21:23
    
I did not do the downvote! (And I just upvoted) In fact your C++ reference is the best real reason I have heard yet (though I don't really understand why it matters what C++ does in C#, unless it was a convention that was just carried over) –  Vaccano Feb 24 '11 at 2:23
    
@Vaccano I've read somewhere that C# => C++++, and I know it is a lot different and a lot more powerful but it would be a good road map to ditch old programming languages nifty things. –  Kenan F. Deen Feb 24 '11 at 8:03
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Local variables have no default value. Part of the language.

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1  
But why? Why not have them default to null? What is gained by requiring the assignment? –  Vaccano Feb 23 '11 at 21:23
    
It's like mrz said -- it's to protect the programmer. The same rule exists in other languages (like Java). I've been saved by this rule by the compiler complaining after it discovers a possible execution path that leads to using a local variable before it is assigned a definite value. It turns out that this was almost always due to a mistake on my part. If local variables had default values, this kind of check would be impossible. (BTW, why are you down-voting correct answers? If you don't like the message, why hurt the messengers?) –  Ted Hopp Feb 23 '11 at 22:29
    
I have not cast a single downvote on this question (and generally am quite sparse with downvotes). I would not downvote a stackoverflow answser just because it was somthing I did not want to hear. –  Vaccano Feb 24 '11 at 2:20
    
@Vaccano - My apologies. Someone seems to have downvoted every answer where you had voiced an objection. It was an unwarranted conclusion on my part that it was your downvotes. –  Ted Hopp Feb 24 '11 at 19:07
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Well if you want it to be null then you need to tell it to. This is to catch bugs. The compiler and utilities like ReSharper searches all execution paths and makes sure that variables are initialized before they are being used. This is to catch common coding mistakes. So there is no additional "not even null" value possible, it is only an analysis done by the compiler (or whatever) to help you out.

Class members are initialized to default values (e.g. null for reference types), so there you get the behavior you expect.

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I'd say it's an optimisation too. Assigning null to something before you're going to set it to another value is just wasted instructions. –  Mark H Feb 23 '11 at 20:35
    
Well, if the compiler is anything but lousy it should detect that and never even do the initial assignment. –  Anders Zommarin Feb 23 '11 at 20:43
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This has to do with C#'s goal to help ensure code correctness. In a class declaration (as opposed to with local variables), members have implicit values so that you don't have to explicitly set them in the declaration or the class constructor. In the context of a function/method, however, C# tracks whether a variable has been explicitly set, so that it can warn you about things just like what you're seeing... it's a design decision on the part of the language.

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1  
Hmmmm, it seems almost just as easy to require initialization at the class level as it is at the local level. If it is "good" at the local level, why is it not at the class level? –  Vaccano Feb 23 '11 at 20:38
    
I'd agree. Interestingly, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691172(v=VS.71).aspx says that a struct's members share the "definite assignment tracking" behavior, but says nothing about classes. –  JaredReisinger Feb 23 '11 at 20:45
    
Ahh... the previous section, msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa691171(v=VS.71).aspx, calls out that statics and class instance variables get default values. Nothing about the "why" of this, though. –  JaredReisinger Feb 23 '11 at 20:48
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You can write equivalent but more compact code with using construct that calls Dispose for you:

using (var command = new SqlCeCommand
       { 
           // init code removed for brevity
       })
{

    // Do stuff 
    // Do more stuff
}

You won't need to worry neither about disposing nor about checking for nullity.

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You can test for null as null is a value. Not initialized means no value so you can not test for it.

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