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I'm refactoring my code and wanted to use the IPAddress.TryParse method to validate if a string is a valid IPv4 address instead of using regular expressions:

public static bool IsIPv4(string value)
{
    IPAddress address;

    if (IPAddress.TryParse(value, out address))
    {
        if (address.AddressFamily == AddressFamily.InterNetwork)
        {
            return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

My unit test is now failing because these input values return true and get parsed to the following IPAddress objects:

value = "0.0.0.0"      ->  address = {0.0.0.0}
value = "255.255.255"  ->  address = {255.255.0.255}
value = "65536"        ->  address = {0.1.0.0}

Does this make sense? I can see that 0.0.0.0 is technically a valid IPv4 address, even if it makes no sense for the user to enter that. What about the other two? Why are they converted in the way they are and should I treat them as valid even if it might not be transparent for the user, who maybe just forgot to enter the periods (65536 instead of 6.5.5.36).

Any help is most appreciated.

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1  
The last one is a conversion from base-256 number, which is a valid representation of an ip address. There is a known url-hiding scheme where you use that number, something like http://65536. –  mellamokb Feb 23 '11 at 20:45

10 Answers 10

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like the docs for IPAddress.Parse rationalize this behavior by pointing out that entering less parts is convenient for entering class A and B addresses. If you want to force a four-part address, you might just want to check that there are three periods in the address before feeding it to IPAddress.TryParse, I guess.

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Try using this, ValidIpAddressRegex = "^(([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.){3}([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9‌​]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$"; –  Roshe Sep 27 '13 at 3:53

The below code is using regex, suggested by Roshe

        string txt = textBox1.Text;

        string ValidIpAddressRegex = "^(([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\\.){3}([0-9]|[1-9][0-9]|1[0-9‌​]{2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])$";    // IP validation 

        Regex r = new Regex(ValidIpAddressRegex, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase | RegexOptions.Singleline);
        Match m = r.Match(txt);

        if (!m.Success)
        {
          //Not a valid IP
        }

        else
        {


          //A valid IP

        }
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    public static bool IsIPv4(string ipAddress)
    {
        return Regex.IsMatch(ipAddress, @"^\d{1,3}(\.\d{1,3}){3}$") &&
            ipAddress.Split('.').SingleOrDefault(s => int.Parse(s) > 255) == null;
    }

Other answers either allow IPv6 or allow input like "1.-0.1.1".

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Although this question was answered like two years ago, I think it is relevant to bring up what I figured out when I was looking for the same thing today, and after finding this page decided I was far too lazy to go through all the validation progmatically.

If the information is being accepted through a Form and a TextBox, it would be in your best interest to use a MaskedTextBox instead. You can force the user to put in information in IP Address format instead of having to do the guesswork yourself.

The mask to be used for such validation is 990.990.990.990 which says OptionalNumber, OptionalNumber, MandatoryNumber because 1.1.1.1, 10.10.10.10, and 123.123.123.123 are all valid IP Address formats. The masks are the same format that Microsoft uses in Access.

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I agree that masked text boxes are a good idea when you can control the user input at the UI level. Anyhow the question was more focused on why IPAddress.TryParse is behaving in the described way. –  Martin Buberl Sep 3 '13 at 3:20

I suggest:

    public bool IsValidIp(string addr)
    {
        IPAddress ip;
        bool valid = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(addr) && IPAddress.TryParse(addr, out ip);
        return valid;
    }
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2  
This doesn't answer the question. It only adds a null check to the problem's scope. –  Nick Rippe Oct 18 '12 at 15:07
1  
This is what exactly he was asking about, comon read the question atleast –  Mubashar Ahmad Dec 10 '13 at 1:40
1  
No, it isn't... at all. –  Rushyo Aug 14 '14 at 8:47

The job of IPAddress.TryParse() is not to check if the string is a valid IP address, but whether or not the content of the string can be parsed (i.e.; converted) to a valid IP address.

All of the options in your test cases can in fact be parsed to represent and IP. What it comes down to is that your test cases are valid. The issue is that the data for your test cases are not valid, or you're not using the right tool(s) in your test case to get the expected result.

If you're specifically testing for a valid IPv4, with exactly 4 quads (each being an integer between 0 - 255), and want to avoid regex your could instead split then parse and validate.

    public static bool IsIPv4(string value)
    {
        var quads = value.Split('.');

        // if we do not have 4 quads, return false
        if (!(quads.Length==4)) return false;

        // for each quad
        foreach(var quad in quads) 
        {
            int q;
            // if parse fails 
            // or length of parsed int != length of quad string (i.e.; '1' vs '001')
            // or parsed int < 0
            // or parsed int > 255
            // return false
            if (!Int32.TryParse(quad, out q) 
                || !q.ToString().Length.Equals(quad.Length) 
                || q < 0 
                || q > 255) { return false; }

        }

        return true;
    }
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The number of parts (each part is separated by a period) in ipString determines how the IP address is constructed. A one part address is stored directly in the network address. A two part address, convenient for specifying a class A address, puts the leading part in the first byte and the trailing part in the right-most three bytes of the network address. A three part address, convenient for specifying a class B address, puts the first part in the first byte, the second part in the second byte, and the final part in the right-most two bytes of the network address. For example:

Number of parts and example ipString IPv4 address for IPAddress

1 -- "65536" 0.0.255.255

2 -- "20.2" 20.0.0.2

2 -- "20.65535" 20.0.255.255

3 -- "128.1.2" 128.1.0.2

You may want to refer MSDN documentation http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.net.ipaddress.parse.aspx

Your best bet will be IPAddress.ToString() or regular expressions.

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I have a valid regular expressions method. For whatever reason I thought refactoring to IPAddress.TryParse is more elegant, but actually it seems more confusing ;) –  Martin Buberl Feb 23 '11 at 22:02
2  
There's a typo in the MSDN documentation. 65536 parses to 0.1.0.0. 65535 to 0.0.255.255 –  Martin Buberl Feb 23 '11 at 22:18

If you want to be very strict about your input, then you can compare the ToString() version of the parsed IPAddress, and reject the input if they are different.

The all-zero address, and other such things, would have to be handled as special cases.

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Yes, those are valid addresses. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPv4#Address_representations for more information.

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1  
From there, I don't see how the 2nd example parses to the result mentioned value = "255.255.255" -> address = {255.255.0.255} Specifically why is the 3rd octet zeroed out instead of either the first or the last? –  Davy8 Feb 23 '11 at 20:51

It makes sense, as 65536 is equal to 0x00010000, or 0.1.0.0. I'm guessing TryParse will also accept hex numbers. In any case, I don't think that you'd want to accept such a value from a normal user, but I suppose that depends on the end user.

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