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I am learning ASP.NET MVC, and I can read English documents, but I don't really understand what is happening with this code:

public class Genre
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

What does this mean: ({ get; set; })?

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2  
possible duplicate of What does this mean ? public Name {get; set;} –  nawfal Jun 3 '13 at 19:05

11 Answers 11

up vote 68 down vote accepted

It's a so-called auto property, and is essentially a shorthand for the following (similar code will be generated by the compiler):

private string name;
public string Name
{
    get
    {
        return this.name;
    }
    set
    {
        this.name = value;
    }
}
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5  
Klaus, can you explain what will happen with this code? It could benefit from a more thorough explanation. –  TylerH Nov 17 '14 at 18:53
    
So, just to be sure: it is like if I overloaded the = operator, but only for one particular element, right? –  Hi-Angel Jan 12 at 9:01

Those are automatic properties

Basically another way of writing a property with a backing field.

public class Genre
{
    private string _name;

    public string Name 
    { 
      get { return _name; }
      set { _name = value; }
    }
}
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What is called " backing field"? –  kn3l Feb 23 '11 at 20:54
    
@Jon that's what I thought, so done ;) –  Sam Holder Feb 23 '11 at 20:54
1  
Succinct - a demonstration of use may go down well, too. –  Grant Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 20:55
2  
@stackunderflow: The backing field is where the data is stored. (what is returned when using get, and persisted using set). Like the cupboard to which get and set opens the door of. –  Grant Thomas Feb 23 '11 at 20:57
    
@stackunderflow: In this answer, the backing field is _name. In the automatic property, the backing field is hidden. –  Justin Feb 23 '11 at 21:00

Its the short way of doing this:

public class genre
{
  private string _name;

  public string Name
  {
    get
    {
      return _name;
    }
    set
    {
      _name = value;
    }
  }
}
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It is a shortcut to expose data members as public so that you don't need to explicitly create a private data members. C# will creates a private data member for you.

You could just make your data members public without using this shortcut but then if you decided to change the implementation of the data member to have some logic then you would need to break the interface. So in short it is a shortcut to create more flexible code.

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Its an auto-implemented property for C#.

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Eh... Does this mean that you keep nil reference to the string and then load it's value from a standard location when get; set; is called? –  Aurum Aquila Feb 23 '11 at 20:52
    
Yes it keeps null like any string variable until someInstanceOfGenere.Name = "someValue" –  Daniel A. White Feb 23 '11 at 20:56

That is an Auto-Implemented Property. It's basically a shorthand way of creating properties for a class in C#, without having to define private variables for them. They are normally used when no extra logic is required when getting or setting the value of a variable.

You can read more on MSDN's Auto-Implemented Properties Programming Guide.

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They are the accessors for the public property Name.

You would use them to get/set the value of that property in an instance of Genre.

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This mean that if you create a variable of type Genre, you will be able to access the variable as a property

Genre oG = new Genre();
oG.Name = "Test";
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4  
When you don't use auto-implemented properties, you still able to access it in this manner. i.e. AIP is not about access from outside, but about declaration inside a class. –  abatishchev Feb 23 '11 at 21:02

Such { get; set; } syntax is called automatic properties, C# 3.0 syntax

You must use Visual C# 2008 / csc v3.5 or above to compile. But you can compile output that targets as low as .NET Framework 2.0 (no runtime or classes required to support this feature).

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Get set are access modifiers to property. Get reads the property field. Set sets the property value. Get is like Read-only access. Set is like Write-only access. To use the property as read write both get and set must be used.

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