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I'm having two weird errors

New error is when i tell java to draw a string that displays the coordinateness of x and y, It doesn't.

public void paint (Graphics g)
{
    super.paint (g);

   //System.out.println ("Boolean: " + this.closeDoors);


    g.drawString("("+x+","+y+")",x,y);
}

Link to my program if you to compile it. http://hotfile.com/dl/107032853/c81d927/Pigment.java.html

This is my complete program

/*
 * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
 * and open the template in the editor.
 */
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.applet.Applet;
import java.awt.Graphics;

/**
 *
 * @author George Beazer
 */
public class Pigment extends JApplet 
{
    boolean closeDoors;
    private int x = 0;
    private int y = 0;


    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
            Pigment stuff = new Pigment();
    }
    public Pigment()

    {

        setBackground (Color.blue);
    }

    @Override
    public void init()
    {
         setLayout(new FlowLayout());
         addMouseListener(new MyMouseListener());
    }
    @Override
    public void paint (Graphics g)
    {
        super.paint (g);

       //System.out.println ("Boolean: " + this.closeDoors);


        g.drawString("("+x+","+y+")",x,y);
         if (x > 35)

            {
                            g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
                g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
                g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
                g.fillRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
                g.fillRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
                g.fillRect (240, 200, 125, 200);


            }

        else
            {        
            g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
            g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
            g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
            g.drawLine (180, 120, 100, 120);
            g.drawLine (400, 120, 480, 120);
            g.drawLine (140, 75, 140, 160);
            g.drawLine (450, 75, 450, 160);
            g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
            g.drawRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
            g.drawRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
            g.drawRect (240, 200, 125, 200);
            g.drawOval (330,280, 20, 20);
            }


    }
    private class MyMouseListener implements MouseListener
    {
        public void mouseClicked (MouseEvent e)
        {
            x = e.getX();
            y = e.getY();

        }

        public void mouseEntered (MouseEvent e)
        {


        }
        public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e){}
        public void mousePressed (MouseEvent e){

        }
        public void mouseReleased (MouseEvent e){}

    }

}
share|improve this question
2  
I might be missing something but I can't see a single loop in your code sample. –  biziclop Feb 23 '11 at 21:10
2  
Where is you loop? You only have a break which is in an IF statement. –  Amir Raminfar Feb 23 '11 at 21:12
2  
You should accept correct answers to your previous questions. –  Lucas Zamboulis Feb 23 '11 at 21:14
    
You really need to go and click the CheckMark on the answers that are "Accepted" on your previous questions, people are going to stop answering you if you don't. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 23 '11 at 21:47
1  
Also hotfile.com is a TERRIBLE place to expect people to download code from. It is a pay site and hideous to deal with if you don't have a subscription. Consider something like the Gist feature of github.com in the future. –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 23 '11 at 21:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

With regards to your first question, the reason that you're getting a compiler error here:

if (x > 35)
{
    g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
    g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);

    repaint();
    break;  
}

Is that this break statement is not actually in a loop. In Java, you can break out of while, for, do...while, and switch statements, but not if statements. There's not a particularly good reason for this - it's mainly historical - but the compiler does indeed enforce it.

Of the three aforementioned control structures, for, while, and do...while are referred to as loops because they execute code potentially many times. The break statement in this case is a way of saying "please abort execution of the current loop; I don't want to run it any more." Its opposite is continue, which means "please go to the next iteration of this loop."

The reason you can break out of a switch is because Java's switch statement is based on the C programming language's version of switch in which labels are "fall-through." In this context, break means "I have finished executing all of the code I want to execute in this particular label; please get me out of this statement." Interestingly, you can break out of a switch, but you can't continue.

However, you cannot break out of an if statement. There is no high-level reason for this, and in fact the language designers could just as easily have allowed this behavior to mean "stop executing this part of the if statement." I think the reason they opted not to do this is that if statements have a sort of "implicit break" at the end of each handler. For example, if you write

if (condition()) {
    // A
} else {
    // B
}
// C

Then after executing A, the control flow will immediately jump you to C, rather than falling through to the else handler.

If you want to simulate a break out of of the middle of an if statement, you could do something like this:

if (condition()) {
     // code

     if (someOtherCondition()) {
          // more code
     }
}

The idea here is that you run the if statement for some time, then decide using a second if statement whether or not to run the rest of the code in the loop.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
I din see your message before :) –  x.509 Feb 23 '11 at 21:20
    
Yes i understand that, but how do I make the repaint(); run once?> –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:20
    
@user516805- I think the issue is that you're calling repaint within paint, which means that every time the window is painted, it will get painted again. Removing that line should fix this problem. –  templatetypedef Feb 23 '11 at 21:21
    
@user516805: you're calling repaint within paint... could that be the issue? – nico 6 mins ago I'm calling repaint withing pain because i painted something, then i change the paint and I want it to show the paint i made changes to. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:25
    
I'm calling repaint withing pain because i painted something, then i change the paint and I want it to show the paint i made changes to. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:25

if (x > 35) {...} is not a loop it is a statement.

for (int x = 0; x <= 35; x++) {...} is a loop.

while( x <= 35 ) {...} is a loop.

do {...} while ( x <= 35 ) is a loop.

Take the repaint() call out it is redundant.

You really need to go and click the CheckMark on the answers that are "Accepted" on your previous questions, people are going to stop answering you if you don't.

share|improve this answer
    
Then how do stop repain(); from paint over and over again. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:14
    
@user516805: you're calling repaint within paint... could that be the issue? –  nico Feb 23 '11 at 21:18
    
I'm calling repaint withing pain because i painted something, then i change the paint and I want it to show the paint i made changes to. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:21

Java won't run because there a break statement outside a loop, but I have it inside a loop.

No, you have it inside an if statement, which is not a loop. Even if it worked, break would be useless there, the statement will be executed only once.

share|improve this answer

An if-else block is not a loop, that is your issue here. Your second error might be because x and y are not declared, at least not in the code you showed us.

share|improve this answer
    
I defined the x and y coordinateness as private int x = 0; private int y = 0;. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:17

at your line 59, there is break statement in the IF block. which doesn't make sense. Remove it and your program is good to go.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you make the repaint(); method run once. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:23
    
what do you mean for once. is it your program requirement? if yes then you gotta reconsider your design. is it your debugging requirement? then put the breakpoint on IF condition. It will stop on every execution. you can let it execute first time and can debug second time. –  x.509 Feb 23 '11 at 21:26
    
Java repaint is in loop, how do i make it run once. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:29
    
I can't see any loop in your program. perhaps you are calling it from some other class. I don't know. the worst case solution would be in your class, -- private static int counter = 0; .. and then where you are doing the repain(); .. do it this way .. if (counter == 0){repaint(); counter++;} --- but this isn't "right" solution. just put it this way to help you out –  x.509 Feb 23 '11 at 21:33
    
I have another g.drawString("("+x+","+y+")",x,y); is somehow hiding it's self in behind of the object i painted. How do i make g.drawString("("+x+","+y+")",x,y); appear in front or move it. –  lonesarah Feb 23 '11 at 21:40

Thanks alee for your suggestion.

I move repaint(); method from the paint class to MyMouseListener class. That work perfectly and Java was repainting a image constantly,

Chapter 14 Java Programming Challenge number 2.

Write an applet that draws the house shown on the left in figure 14-32. When the user clicks

on the door or windows, they should close. The figure on the right shows the house with its

door and windows closed.

/*
 * To change this template, choose Tools | Templates
 * and open the template in the editor.
 */
import javax.swing.*;
import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import java.awt.Graphics;

/**
 *
 * @author George Beazer
 */
public class Pigment extends JApplet 
{
    public int x = 0;
    public int y = 0;


    public static void main(String [] args)
    {
    }
    public Pigment()

    {
        setBackground (Color.blue);
    }

    @Override
    public void init()
    {
        setLayout(new FlowLayout());

        addMouseListener(new MyMouseListener());
    }
    @Override
    public void paint (Graphics g)
    {
        super.paint (g);

        //System.out.println ("Boolean: " + this.closeDoors);




        if (x > 100 && x < 175 && y < 155 && y > 75)
            {
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
                g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (180, 120, 100, 120);
                g.drawLine (400, 120, 480, 120);
                g.drawLine (140, 75, 140, 154);
                g.drawLine (440, 75, 440, 154);
                g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
                g.drawRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (240, 200, 125, 200);
                g.drawOval (330,280, 20, 20);
            }
        else if (x > 400 && x < 475 && y < 155 && y > 75)
            {
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
                g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (180, 120, 100, 120);
                g.drawLine (400, 120, 480, 120);
                g.drawLine (140, 75, 140, 154);
                g.drawLine (440, 75, 440, 154);
                g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
                g.drawRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (240, 200, 125, 200);
                g.drawOval (330,280, 20, 20);
            }

        else if (x > 240 && x < 360 && y < 400 && y > 200)
            {
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
                g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (180, 120, 100, 120);
                g.drawLine (400, 120, 480, 120);
                g.drawLine (140, 75, 140, 154);
                g.drawLine (440, 75, 440, 154);
                g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
                g.drawRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
                g.drawRect (240, 200, 125, 200);
                g.drawOval (330,280, 20, 20);
            }
        else
            {        
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 570, 50);
                g.drawLine (35, 50, 250, 0);
                g.drawLine (250, 0, 570, 50);
                g.drawRect (50, 50, 500, 350);
                g.fillRect (100, 75, 80, 80);
                g.fillRect (400, 75, 80, 80);
                g.fillRect (240, 200, 125, 200);
            }

    }

    private class MyMouseListener implements MouseListener
    {

        public void mouseEntered (MouseEvent e)
        {
        }
        public void mouseExited(MouseEvent e)
        {       
        }
        public void mousePressed (MouseEvent e)

        {
        }
        public void mouseReleased (MouseEvent e){}

        public void mouseClicked(MouseEvent e)
        {
            x = e.getX();
            y = e.getY();
            showStatus( "Mouse at (" + x + "," + y + ")" );
            repaint();
        }       
    }
}

You can close this thread.

share|improve this answer
1  
You should mark the most helpful answer as "accepted". –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 24 '11 at 15:17

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