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Sorry for this newbie question, just got starting. I want a simple program to look in a file for reverse words, so a wrote this source, but it doesn't work. After it goes into the second "for" loop, it doesn't go back to the first loop, instead it ends the program. Any clue?

def is_reverse(word1, word2):   
   if len(word1) == len(word2):
     if word1 == word2[::-1]:
       return True   
return False

fin = open('List.txt') 
for word1 in fin:
    word1 = word1.strip()
    word1 = word1.lower()
    for word2 in fin:
      word2 = word2.strip()
      word2 = word2.lower()
      print word1 + word2
      if is_reverse(word1, word2) is True:
             print word1 + ' is the opposite of ' + word2 

EDIT: I tried to loop a file vs a list, and got a curious (to me) result. If I use this code everything works:

def is_reverse(word1, word2):
  if len(word1) == len(word2):
      if word1 == word2[::-1]:
        return True
  return False

fin = open('List.txt')
fin2 = ['test1','test2','test3','test4','test5']
for word1 in fin:
    word1 = word1.strip()
    word1 = word1.lower()
    for word2 in fin2:
      word2 = word2.strip()
      word2 = word2.lower()
      print word1 + word2
      if is_reverse(word1, word2) is True:
             print word1 + ' is the opposite of ' + word2

If I exchange fin and fin2 the first loop does only one itineration. Can someone explain me why?

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2  
Paste the real code, this one has syntax errors and undefined variables. –  Jochen Ritzel Feb 23 '11 at 21:56
    
What do you think of my solution ? –  eyquem Feb 24 '11 at 9:41

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

for word1 in fin iterates line-by-line, so word1 is really a line, not a word. Is that what you intended?

for word2 in fin is using the same iterator, so I think it will consume all the input, and for word1 in fin will only be done once.

So the simplest change is to have two files, file1 and file2, and re-open file2 for every pass thru the loop.

def is_reverse(word1, word2):   
   if len(word1) == len(word2):
     if word1 == word2[::-1]:
       return True   
return False

file1 = open('List.txt') 
for word1 in file1:
    word1 = word1.strip()
    word1 = word1.lower()
    file2 = open('List.txt')
    for word2 in file2:
      word2 = word2.strip()
      word2 = word2.lower()
      print word1 + word2
      if is_reverse(word1, word2):
             print word1 + ' is the opposite of ' + word2 

But probably a better way is to read the files once into a list and then iterate over the list rather than the file, e.g.

def is_reverse(word1, word2):
    if len(word1) == len(word2):
        if word1 == word2[::-1]:
            return True
    return False

file = open('List.txt')
words = list(file)
for word1 in words:
    word1 = word1.strip()
    word1 = word1.lower()
    for word2 in words:
        word2 = word2.strip()
        word2 = word2.lower()
        print word1 + word2
        if is_reverse(word1, word2):
            print word1 + ' is the opposite of ' + word2 

To answer your other question, about why you can iterate over the same list twice but not over the same file:

A for element in iterable loop asks the iterable for its iterator by calling iterable.__iter__.

When Python asks a file for its iterator, the file returns itself. This means that every iterator over a file shares the same state/position.

>>> file = open('testfile.txt')
>>> it1 = iter(file)
>>> it2 = iter(file)
>>> id(it1)
3078689064L
>>> id(it2)
3078689064L
>>> id(file)
3078689064L

When you ask a list for its iterator, you get a different iterator every time, with its own separate information about its position.

>>> list = [1,2,3]
>>> it3 = iter(list)
>>> it4 = iter(list)
>>> id(it3)
3078746156L
>>> id(it4)
3078746188L
>>> id(list)
3078731244L

Postscript

As Hugh points out, iterating over the list of words for each word is going to be very inefficient.

Here's a way that's much faster. Change List.txt to a very big file, e.g. /usr/share/dict/words on a Linux system to see what I mean.

words = []
wordset = set(())

file = open('List.txt')
for line in file:
    word = line.strip('\n')
    words.append(word)
    wordset.add(word)

for word in words:
    reversed = word[::-1]
    if reversed in wordset:
        print word + ' is the opposite of ' + reversed
share|improve this answer
1  
Correct. The easiest solution is to change the open line to fin = list(open('List.txt')) to cache the entire file in memory. (And probably the source file is known to only contain one word per line - common in homework assignments...) –  Zooba Feb 23 '11 at 22:01
    
Ok, I think is the best answer to my question. :) –  nuNce Feb 23 '11 at 22:14

If you actually want to compare the list against itself, you can avoid an iteration by testing for value in set:

def getWords(fname):
    with open(fname) as inf:
        words = list(w.strip().lower() for w in inf)
    ws = set(words)
    words = list(ws)
    words.sort()
    return words, ws

def wordsInReverse(words, wordset):
    for w in words:
        rw = w[::-1]  # reverse the string
        if rw in wordset:
            yield w,rw

def main():
    words, wordSet = getWords('List.txt')

    for w,rw in wordsInReverse(words, wordSet):
        if rw >= w:  # don't print duplicates
            print('{0} is the opposite of {1}'.format(w, rw))        

if __name__=="__main__":
    main()

and to cross-compare two files:

from itertools import chain

def main():
    words1, wordSet1 = getWords('List1.txt')
    words2, wordSet2 = getWords('List2.txt')

    for w,rw in chain(wordsInReverse(words1, wordSet2), wordsInReverse(words2, wordSet1)):
        print('{0} is the opposite of {1}'.format(w, rw))        
share|improve this answer
    
Clearly much more efficient. –  Mikel Feb 23 '11 at 23:39

My guess is you're iterating over "fin" in both loops (although your example code has a mysterious variable "x" in the first loop). Instead try using a separate handle to the file in each loop, like this:

fin1 = open("list.txt")
for word1 in fin1:
    fin2 = open("list.txt")
    for word2 in fin2:
        ...etc...
share|improve this answer
    
But is this a good idea though? I mean, if n was the number of lines in the file, how many times would the file be opened/read? n+1 times, right? There should be no need to read the file more than once. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Feb 23 '11 at 22:01
    
Ok, thanks for the answers! The X variable was the result of some testing i did with lists, so I edited the code. I noticed that even if I use a file and a list, the loop still halts if I load it into a variable before starting the loops, but only if the file is used for loop2. –  nuNce Feb 23 '11 at 22:08
    
@nuNce: The reason why files and lists are different is that file.__iter__ returns self, but list.__iter__ returns a new object on each call. See my updated answer. –  Mikel Feb 23 '11 at 22:15

There should be no need to read the file more than once.

– Klaus Byskov Hoffmann

It means that it's overconsuming time to iterate two times on the words: if a file contains 1000 words, the reversal of each word will be potentially compared to 1000 words, that is 1000000 comparisons in total;

Here's a code with only one iteration, a dictionary reminds what it has already seen

with open('palindromic.txt') as f:
    ch = f.read()
    li = [ w for w in ch.split() if len(w)>1 ]

dic ={}
pals = set([])

for line in li:
    word = line.strip().lower()
    if len(word)>1:
        if word not in dic:
            dic[word] = 1
            if word[::-1] in dic and word[::-1]!=word:
                pals.add(word)
        else:
            dic[word] += 1


for w in pals:
    print w,dic[w],'  ',w[::-1],dic[w[::-1]]

[ w for w in ch.split() if len(w)>1 ] must be improved to remove parentheses, apostrophes, etc from each word

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