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There is a nice new method in .NET 4.0 for getting files in a directory in a streaming way via enumeration.

The problem here is that if one wishes to enumerate all files one may not know in advance which files or folders are access protected and can throw an UnauthorizedAccessException.

To reproduce, one can just run this fragment:

foreach (var file in Directory.EnumerateFiles(@"c:\", "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories))
{
   // whatever
}

Before this .NET method existed it was possible to achieve roughly the same effect by implementing a recursive iterator on the string-array returning methods. But it's not quite as lazy as the new .NET method is.

So what to do? Can the UnauthorizedAccessException be suppressed or is a fact of life when using this method?

Seems to me that the method should have an overload accepting an action to deal with any exceptions.

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Yes, your Dump() method should be resilient to problems with the files it is trying to dump. Give it an overload. –  Hans Passant Feb 23 '11 at 22:33
    
That's not my problem Hans. The problem is that foreach-ing over the file iterator (EnumerateFiles) provokes an UnauthorizedAccessException and that in turn halts further enumeration, which is not desirable when one wants an exhaustive result set. –  Bent Rasmussen Feb 23 '11 at 22:36
    
@Hans - The Dump() method is not the problem here, it just walks through the string enumeration. The problem is the Directory.EnumerateFiles method itself. And I don’t think there is a way to handle the problem. You have to resort to SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly and handle the recursion yourself, I believe. –  Mormegil Feb 23 '11 at 22:37
    
@Mormegil - There's an easy workaround. It kind of sucks though... –  Bent Rasmussen Feb 23 '11 at 22:53
1  
This (and other reasons) is why I finally ended up writing a wrapper for NtQueryDirectoryFile myself. –  Mehrdad Feb 23 '11 at 23:32
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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I Couldn't get the above to work, but here is my implementation, i've tested it on c:\users on a "Win7" box, because if has all these "nasty" dirs:

SafeWalk.EnumerateFiles(@"C:\users", "*.jpg", SearchOption.AllDirectories).Take(10)

Class:

public static class SafeWalk
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> EnumerateFiles(string path, string searchPattern, SearchOption searchOpt)
    {   
        try
        {
            var dirFiles = Enumerable.Empty<string>();
    if(searchOpt == SearchOption.AllDirectories)
            {
                dirFiles = Directory.EnumerateDirectories(path)
                                    .SelectMany(x => EnumerateFiles(x, searchPattern, searchOpt));
            }
            return dirFiles.Concat(Directory.EnumerateFiles(path, searchPattern));
        }
        catch(UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
        {
            return Enumerable.Empty<string>();
        }
    }
}
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Thanks strudso. This appears to work. –  Bent Rasmussen Jul 8 '11 at 18:15
    
Nice answer. Thank you! –  Matthew M. Oct 31 '11 at 16:45
    
I also ran into a problem with this. The solution I came up with can be found at stackoverflow.com/questions/13130052/…. It behaves as a true enumerable in the sense that it only does work if you ask for the next item from it. –  Matthew Brubaker Nov 20 '12 at 19:18
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I understand it's MoveNext that throws the exception.

I tried to write a method that safe-walks a sequence and tries to ignore MoveNext exceptions. However I'm not sure if MoveNext advances position when it throws an exception, so this might as well be infinite loop. It is also bad idea because we would rely on implementation details.

But it's just so much fun!

public static IEnumerable<T> SafeWalk<T> (this IEnumerable<T> source)
{
    var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
    bool? hasCurrent = null;

    do {
        try {
            hasCurrent = enumerator.MoveNext();
        } catch {
            hasCurrent = null; // we're not sure
        }

        if (hasCurrent ?? false) // if not sure, do not return value
            yield return enumerator.Current;

    } while (hasCurrent ?? true); // if not sure, continue walking
}

foreach (var file in Directory.EnumerateFiles("c:\\", "*", SearchOption.AllDirectories)
                              .SafeWalk())
{
    // ...
}

This will only work if the following conditions are true about framework's implementation of this iterator (see FileSystemEnumerableIterator<TSource> in Reflector for reference):

  • MoveNext advances its position when it fails;
  • When MoveNext fails on last element, subsequent calls will return false instead of throwing an exception;
  • This behavior is consistent for different versions of .NET Framework;
  • I haven't made any logic or syntax mistakes.

Even if it works, please, never use it in production!
But I really wonder if it does.

share|improve this answer
    
Not bad, but it wohn't work for my scenario: I need it to continue and move on when it meets an exception: the only difference between a safe-walk and a normal walk is that the safe-walk just stops enumeration whilst the normal method stops with an exception. I need it to continue and ignore any exceptions in the sense that it should enumerate all directories it can and just skip the ones it doesn't have access to. That, unfortunately it appears, requires a new implementation of the BCL implementation. –  Bent Rasmussen Mar 17 '11 at 0:01
    
...I would have no issue using it in production if it worked ;-) ... but even then it would need a few modifications: for example you don't want to catch all exceptions, it should just be UnauthorizedAccessException or at least it should be filterable via a lambda. –  Bent Rasmussen Mar 17 '11 at 0:02
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Ths issue with the above answer is that is does not take care of exception in sub directories. This would be a better way to handling those exceptions so you get ALL files from ALL subdirectories except those with threw an access exception:

    /// <summary>
    /// A safe way to get all the files in a directory and sub directory without crashing on UnauthorizedException
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="rootPath">Starting directory</param>
    /// <param name="patternMatch">Filename pattern match</param>
    /// <param name="searchOption">Search subdirectories or only top level directory for files</param>
    /// <returns>List of files</returns>
    public static IEnumerable<string> GetDirectoryFiles(string rootPath, string patternMatch, SearchOption searchOption)
    {
        IEnumerable<string> foundFiles = Enumerable.Empty<string>(); // Start with an empty container

        if (searchOption == SearchOption.AllDirectories)
        {
            try
            {
                IEnumerable<string> subDirs = Directory.EnumerateDirectories(rootPath);
                foreach (string dir in subDirs)
                {
                    foundFiles = foundFiles.Concat(GetDirectoryFiles(dir, patternMatch, searchOption)); // Add files in subdirectories recursively to the list
                }
            }
            catch (UnauthorizedAccessException) { } // Incase we have an access error - we don't want to mask the rest
        }

        try
        {
            foundFiles = foundFiles.Concat(Directory.EnumerateFiles(rootPath, patternMatch)); // Add files from the current directory to the list
        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException) { } // Incase we have an access error - we don't want to mask the rest

        return foundFiles; // This is it finally
    }
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Based on strudso's answer, but as extension methods for both FileInfo and DirectoryInfo.

public static IEnumerable<FileInfo> EnumerateFilesSafe(this DirectoryInfo dir, string filter = "*.*", SearchOption opt = SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
{
    var retval = Enumerable.Empty<FileInfo>();

    try { retval = dir.EnumerateFiles(filter); }
    catch { Debug.WriteLine("{0} Inaccessable.", dir.FullName); }

    if (opt == SearchOption.AllDirectories)
        retval = retval.Concat(dir.EnumerateDirectoriesSafe(opt: opt).SelectMany(x => x.EnumerateFilesSafe(filter, opt)));

    return retval;
}

public static IEnumerable<DirectoryInfo> EnumerateDirectoriesSafe(this DirectoryInfo dir, string filter = "*.*", SearchOption opt = SearchOption.TopDirectoryOnly)
{
    var retval = Enumerable.Empty<DirectoryInfo>();

    try { retval = dir.EnumerateDirectories(filter); }
    catch { Debug.WriteLine("{0} Inaccessable.", dir.FullName); }

    if (opt == SearchOption.AllDirectories)
        retval = retval.Concat(retval.SelectMany(x => x.EnumerateDirectoriesSafe(filter, opt)));

    return retval;
}
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Actually, I'm not sure if this is the best option. What would happen if it were to be Enumerate* got a bit more lazy and threw an exception during enumeration? –  Fowl Jan 23 '12 at 3:46
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