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I render a View with a table in it. Each row of the table is an object that could be edited. So, the last column of this table has a bunch of "EDIT" buttons. When one of these EDIT buttons is clicked, JavaScript function must pick up the Id of the object represented by current row. Ultimately, I would like to end up with a clean HTML: no "onclick", "onmouseover" attributes and no custom made-up attributes. Below I have 2 examples that I'm not thrilled with. Any good ideas?

Example 1:

View.aspx

<td>
  <input type="button" value="EDIT" onclick="JSFunction(<%: ObjectId %>)" />
</td>

JavaScript

function JSFunction(id)
{
    //some code that does whatever with id
}

Example 2:

View.aspx

<td>
  <input type="button" value="EDIT" customAttribute="<%: ObjectId %>" />
</td>

JavaScript

$('input[type=button]').click(function() {
    var id = this.attr('customAttribute');
    //some code that does whatever with id
});

P.S. If you could come up with a better question title, please share as well :)

share|improve this question
    
Where do you want the customAttribute data to be stored? Once we know where it is we can figure how to access it with jQuery. Or do you want the data to be stored server side and you get it with AJAX? –  mrtsherman Feb 23 '11 at 23:02
    
custom attributes can be considered as clean html. They're even in the HTML5 spec dev.w3.org/html5/spec/… –  Vadim Feb 23 '11 at 23:02
    
@mrtsherman - I want it to be rendered into HTML server side so then at the client, JavaScript could grab that value. –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:20
    
@Yads - Very interesting! I did not know this. Thanks! –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One way I handled this in the past is to use the html5 data-attribute. Which is picked up by versions of jQuery 1.4.3 and above.

<table>
    <tr class="row" data-rowInfo='{"Id": "1", "Name": "Jon"}'>
        <td>
            Row Id 1
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="button" value="Edit"/>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tr class="row" data-rowInfo='{"Id": "2", "Name": "Mark"}'>
        <td>
            Row Id 2
        </td>
        <td>
            <input type="button" value="Edit"/>
        </td>
    </tr>
    <tfoot>
        <tr>
            <td></td>
        </tr>
    </tfoot>
</table>

Then in your jquery you can do the following:

$("input[type=button]").click(function(){
  var rowInfo = $(this).parents("tr.row").data("rowInfo");
  //Do something with rowInfo.Id;
});

By using the data attribute you can have a rich json object that could contain more information than just an attribute. Plus you only have to declare one data-attribute to hold all relevant information.

Example of this working on jsfiddle.

share|improve this answer
    
I was actually playing with data attribute before, but only inside of JavaScript. Is this the right way of constructing it in HTML/aspx? If I FireBug this element, will I see what that data attribute is holding? –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:18
    
+1 I was about to answer something like this but you beat me to it fair and square :) –  Jimmy Feb 23 '11 at 23:18
    
@Dimskiy I think you can inspect the data element with in Firebug using addons.mozilla.org/en-us/firefox/addon/firequery –  Jimmy Feb 23 '11 at 23:20
    
@Jimmy - I have FireQuery installed and I don't see what value the data attribute has. I could see that there is something there, but not the exact value. Is there a trick? :) Maybe a good topic for a separate question. –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:25
    
When you debug the script and add a watch to $(this).parents("tr.row").data("rowInfo") in firebug you can see the contents of the json object. Also if you simply inspect the element in firebug you should be able to see the raw json notation. –  Mark Coleman Feb 23 '11 at 23:32

The way I do it is I have the server render the id to the <tr> tag, you could either make up your own attribute or store it in the id attribute. Then if you have a edit button inside a td you just write jQuery to find the id stored in the <tr> tag.

html:

<tr myId="1">
<td>
  <input type="button" value="EDIT" />
</td>
</tr>

jQuery:

$(function() {
        $("input[type=button]").click(function() {
            var id = $(this).parent().attr("myId");
        });
    });

Although I usually assign a class of "edit" to my edit buttons rather than selecting them by their type (as I have a save button on the page).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I usually go with classes, too. Didn't post it here for simplicity. So, what would you do if there are more then 1 parameter? Stick them into 1 string and parse with JavaScript based on separater character? Server: <%: Id + "|" + OtherParam %> –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:15
    
@Dimskiy, If there is more than one parameter I would go with Marks answer. –  The Muffin Man Feb 24 '11 at 0:19

I would use the jQuery metadata plugin as then data can be embedded in a number of different ways onto any element. The usual way is to add it to the class like this:

<input type="button" class="button { objectId : <%: ObjectId %> }" /> 
share|improve this answer
    
I usually try not to use plugins, unless I really feel like I need them. For example, I would definitely use jQuery UI DatePicker instead of implementing one myself. Thank you for the suggestion though! –  Dimskiy Feb 23 '11 at 23:24

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