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I want to compile file.obj from the commandline. Within the IDE, if I'm viewing file.cpp, I can click on Build -> Compile (or just hit Ctrl-F7), and it will compile just the file.obj object. I would like to be able to do this from the commandline. Ideally, something akin to:

vcbuild project.vcproj Debug file.obj       // not a valid command

I have looked at the documentation for vcbuild, msbuild, and devenv. I've also experimented with all three, but I cannot find a way to do this. I can find a way to build an entire project, but that's not what I want. I want to build a specific source file. /pass1 tells vcbuild to just compile (not link), but it compiles the entire project.

I also looked at using cl, but that is just the compiler. In order to use it, I would have to know all the right parameters to pass to set up my environment correctly. All that is automatically taken care of with msbuild/vcbuild.

With Makefiles, I could always do make file.obj, and it would properly set path, include dirs, etc.

Any options for this? Is there an automated way to extract the appropriate settings from the .vcproj file, and pass them to cl?

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Did you manage to get this to work? –  Robot Mess Mar 20 '13 at 14:02
    
@RobotMess It cannot be done from the commandline. But it can be done within a Visual Studio macro. So, for my needs, I was able to create a macro that did what I needed, compiled the .obj, took action based on success/failure, and continued to do other things as well. I'll see if I can find the macro and post it as an answer. –  Tim Mar 20 '13 at 23:21

2 Answers 2

Using cl is the way to compile single files from the command line. Like you say, it requires/allows you to specify exactly the options you want to use. All the options!

If you actually don't want to do that, why not use the IDE to have it done automagically for you? Why do it the hardest way, if you don't like that?

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I do use the IDE for general development. However, I'm trying to write an automated utility, and it would require repeatedly compiling an individual source file. –  Tim Feb 24 '11 at 19:00
    
@Tim: you can also do that from the IDE (assuming VS) by right-clicking the source file and then choosing "Compile". Otherwise cl.exe and perhaps a small (NMake) make file is the way to go ... –  0xC0000022L Feb 24 '11 at 19:17
    
Automated. Right-clicking is a user action. I need an automated way to do this. –  Tim Feb 24 '11 at 22:02

if you just want to compile the project, run the visual studio command line and call msbuild.

Example:

MSBuild.exe MyProj.proj /property:Configuration=Debug

this will compile the MyProj Project from the current directory.

more info on msbuild http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd393574.aspx

Or if you need to build a single file you can use cl as stated above. You can see all the parameters passed by visual studio to cl if you go in the properties of the project. Usually under:

Configuration Properties -> C/C++ -> Command Line

and for linking:

Configuration Properties -> Linker -> Command Line

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that builds the entire project, which is not what I need. –  Tim Dec 17 '11 at 11:06
    
Ok, modified answer, you should be able to copy all the needed options this way –  Ha11owed Dec 18 '11 at 7:53
    
In order to use cl, I would have to know all the right parameters to pass to it. Yes I could look them up in visual studio, but this is entirely manual, and would have to be done for every file (or at least every project). I'm looking for an automated way. –  Tim Dec 19 '11 at 11:09
    
It should be done for project only. Do you really have so may projects that extracting the settings is a problem ? –  Ha11owed Dec 19 '11 at 19:35

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