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Right now I have a programming assignment to calculate bmi(body mass index) and assign it to a classificaiton. Depending on the bmi it assigns it as follows. I am having trouble with the classification getting the strings. When i try to put the classification in a message box it tells me I do not have it initialized.

            public static void main(String[] args) {
    //Variables
    double bmi;         // Body Mass Index
    String weight;      // Weight in kilograms
    String height;      // height in meters
    String classification;

    weight = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Welcome to the BMI and BSA Calculator to begin enter weight in kilograms.");
    double weight2 = Double.parseDouble(weight);
    height = JOptionPane.showInputDialog("Enter height in meters");
    double height2 = Double.parseDouble(height);

    bmi = weight2/(height2*height2);

    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Your BMI is: " + bmi);

    if (bmi < 18.5)
    {
        classification = "Underweight";
    }
    else if (bmi < 25)
    {
        classification = "Normal";
    }
    else if (bmi < 30)
    {
        classification = "Overweight";
    }
    else
    {
        classification = "Obese";
    }


    JOptionPane.showInternalMessageDialog(null, "Your classification is: " + classification);
share|improve this question
1  
Do you define classification somewhere? String classification; –  Felix Kling Feb 23 '11 at 23:31
    
This should work, despite the parentheses around the string literals being redundant. Also, you might find issues with BMIs in the range [24.9, 25), as they are not covered in your ranges and will default to "Obese" (for example, note what happens if bmi = 24.95). Other than that, what @Felix said. –  Mac Feb 23 '11 at 23:35
    
You need to show us how you declare classification. Also the enclosing () around the string literals aren't needed. You also have a spelling error in the dialog message. –  Alkaline Feb 23 '11 at 23:39
    
Yes I have classification; right above my loop with my other variables also i fixed the range issues (teacher's handout not me) : ) –  Brad Feb 23 '11 at 23:47
    
@Brad: I'll repeat my comment from below: what loop? You don't show one in your code. Please edit your code to show us all of it. –  Mac Feb 23 '11 at 23:49

4 Answers 4

It's not really an answer to your question, but you're missing some values in your if statements. For example, what if bmi was 24.95, that wouldn't enter either the Normal or Overweight blocks.

In general, I try to pick one type of comparison, and just use that.

if (bmi < 18.5)
{
    classification = "Underweight";
}
else if (bmi < 25)
{
    classification = "Normal";
}
else if (bmi < 30)
{
    classification = "Overweight";
}
else
{
    classification = "Obese";
}

As for the error you're getting, assuming classification is declared just above the if statement, it really shouldn't be giving you that error.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry i have some >= and <= in there but they didn't copy over for some reasy –  Brad Feb 23 '11 at 23:37
    
@Brad: I think you've missed the point. Look at your original code and work out what would happen for a BMI of 24.95. –  Jon Skeet Feb 23 '11 at 23:47
    
@Jon Skeet Ah I get it sorry I'm really new to this this is my first programming class and if you haven't noticed I'm struggling a little. : ) –  Brad Feb 23 '11 at 23:55

What happens if you change the last line to

String result = "Your result is: " + classification;        
JOptionPane.showInternalMessageDialog(null, result);

And why are you using showInternalMessageDialog instead of showMessageDialog as previously used.

share|improve this answer

It should work fine, assuming you've declared the variable somewhere. (That's in terms of compiling and running without crashing; as pointed out in comments, the actual BMI comparisons have problems, and the brackets around the string literals are redundant.)

For example:

public class Test
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        double bmi = Double.parseDouble(args[0]);

        String classification;

        if (bmi < 18.5)
        {
            classification = ("Underweight");
        }
        else if (bmi >= 18.5  && bmi < 24.9)
        {
            classification = ("Normal");
        }
        else if (bmi >= 25 && bmi < 29.9)
        {
            classification = ("Overweight");
        }
        else
        {
            classification = ("Obese");
        }

        System.out.println("Classification: " + classification);
    }
}

Please show a similar short but complete program which demonstrates the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
I have it declared right before the loop. –  Brad Feb 23 '11 at 23:40
2  
@Brad: which loop? You don't show one in your code. Showing us all of the code helps us to figure out these things - it looks like wherever the problem is in your code, it's not in what you've posted so far. –  Mac Feb 23 '11 at 23:43

To assign a variable String value do the following:

classification = new String("whatever");
share|improve this answer
2  
No, there's no point in using the new String(String) constructor here. –  Jon Skeet Feb 23 '11 at 23:33
    
I just tried that and it still crashed. –  Brad Feb 23 '11 at 23:35
    
@Asterisk: Yes, classification is a variable name... but why would you call a string constructor instead of just using the literal? And what do you think is wrong with the assignments in the code that's been given already? –  Jon Skeet Feb 23 '11 at 23:36
    
@Jon I've never seen assignment using (). now I know that :) –  Asterisk Feb 23 '11 at 23:40
    
What @Jon said. It's technically correct, but entirely redundant. –  Mac Feb 23 '11 at 23:40

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