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I have the following SQL statement in a legacy system I'm refactoring. It is an abbreviated view for the purposes of this question, just returning count(*) for the time being.

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM Table1 
    INNER JOIN Table2 
        INNER JOIN Table3 ON Table2.Key = Table3.Key AND Table2.Key2 = Table3.Key2 
    ON Table1.DifferentKey = Table3.DifferentKey

It is generating a very large number of records and killing the system, but could someone please explain the syntax? And can this be expressed in any other way?

  • Table1 contains 419 rows
  • Table2 contains 3374 rows
  • Table3 contains 28182 rows

EDIT:

Suggested reformat

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM Table1 
    INNER JOIN Table3
          ON Table1.DifferentKey = Table3.DifferentKey
    INNER JOIN Table2 
          ON Table2.Key = Table3.Key AND Table2.Key2 = Table3.Key2
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Sorry, the editor messed it up, sorted now. I too don't like this format at all hence my question. –  Tim Peel Feb 24 '11 at 1:42
    
what are the relationships between those tables, one-to-many, many-to-many? are there any indexes in place? –  Kris Ivanov Feb 24 '11 at 1:50
    
@K Ivanov - thanks for adjusting the syntax but I've rolled that change back. Part of the question was how can this be reformatted. –  Tim Peel Feb 24 '11 at 1:53
    
Table 3 is a view, which includes several more joins. Two of which join on a column that is the product of a COALESCE. I am presuming this is what is causing the massive record bloat and then it only results in 26448 rows anyway. –  Tim Peel Feb 24 '11 at 2:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

For readability, I restructured the query... starting with the apparent top-most level being Table1, which then ties to Table3, and then table3 ties to table2. Much easier to follow if you follow the chain of relationships.

Now, to answer your question. You are getting a large count as the result of a Cartesian product. For each record in Table1 that matches in Table3 you will have X * Y. Then, for each match between table3 and Table2 will have the same impact... Y * Z... So your result for just one possible ID in table 1 can have X * Y * Z records.

This is based on not knowing how the normalization or content is for your tables... if the key is a PRIMARY key or not..

Ex:
Table 1       
DiffKey    Other Val
1          X
1          Y
1          Z

Table 3
DiffKey   Key    Key2  Tbl3 Other
1         2      6     V
1         2      6     X
1         2      6     Y
1         2      6     Z

Table 2
Key    Key2   Other Val
2      6      a
2      6      b
2      6      c
2      6      d
2      6      e

So, Table 1 joining to Table 3 will result (in this scenario) with 12 records (each in 1 joined with each in 3). Then, all that again times each matched record in table 2 (5 records)... total of 60 ( 3 tbl1 * 4 tbl3 * 5 tbl2 )count would be returned.

So, now, take that and expand based on your 1000's of records and you see how a messed-up structure could choke a cow (so-to-speak) and kill performance.

SELECT
      COUNT(*)
   FROM
      Table1 
         INNER JOIN Table3
            ON Table1.DifferentKey = Table3.DifferentKey
            INNER JOIN Table2
               ON Table3.Key =Table2.Key
               AND Table3.Key2 = Table2.Key2 
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, nice response. As my comment above says, I am presuming it is something to do with join on COALESCE column. The query plan shows a nested loop with no join predicate where data size jumps from 46KB to 322GB - seems odd to be honest as the total rows once joined is only 26448. –  Tim Peel Feb 24 '11 at 2:18
    
@Tim Peel, yup, it sounds like you are exactly running into a Cartesian. If the basis has COALESCE to join "different" values on same key records, that is EXACTLY it... Take a look at threads here... you have one question and 20 people answer it. Then on each answer, you get 5-10 comments... What number are you really looking for... 20 answers * 10 comments = 200 since all tied to one question. Get a legit context before doing such count(*)ing... –  DRapp Feb 24 '11 at 2:23
    
Thanks, marked as answered. I've dropped the product of the view into a separate table and the query is now instant. I'll look at this again when I'm more awake! –  Tim Peel Feb 24 '11 at 2:38

Since you've already received help on the query, I'll take a poke at your syntax question:

The first query employs some lesser-known ANSI SQL syntax which allows you to nest joins between the join and on clauses. This allows you to scope/tier your joins and probably opens up a host of other evil, arcane things.

Now, while a nested join cannot refer any higher in the join hierarchy than its immediate parent, joins above it or outside of its branch can refer to it... which is precisely what this ugly little guy is doing:

select
 count(*)
from Table1 as t1
join Table2 as t2
    join Table3 as t3
    on t2.Key = t3.Key                   -- join #1
    and t2.Key2 = t3.Key2 
on t1.DifferentKey = t3.DifferentKey     -- join #2  

This looks a little confusing because join #2 is joining t1 to t2 without specifically referencing t2... however, it references t2 indirectly via t3 -as t3 is joined to t2 in join #1. While that may work, you may find the following a bit more (visually) linear and appealing:

select
 count(*)
from Table1 as t1
join Table3 as t3
    join Table2 as t2
    on t2.Key = t3.Key                   -- join #1
    and t2.Key2 = t3.Key2   
on t1.DifferentKey = t3.DifferentKey     -- join #2

Personally, I've found that nesting in this fashion keeps my statements tidy by outlining each tier of the relationship hierarchy. As a side note, you don't need to specify inner. join is implicitly inner unless explicitly marked otherwise.

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