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Is it possible to write a C++(0x) metafunction that determines whether a type is callable?

By callable type I mean a function type, function pointer type, function reference type (these are detected by boost::function_types::is_callable_builtin), lambda types, and any class with an overloaded operator() (and maybe any class with an implicit conversion operator to one of these, but that's not absolutely necessary).

EDIT: The metafunction should detect the presence of an operator() with any signature, including a templated operator(). I believe this is the difficult part.

EDIT: Here is a use case:

template <typename Predicate1, typename Predicate2>
struct and_predicate
{
    template <typename ArgT>
    bool operator()(const ArgT& arg)
    {
        return predicate1(arg) && predicate2(arg);
    }

    Predicate1 predicate1;
    Predicate2 predicate2;
};

template <typename Predicate1, typename Predicate2>
enable_if<ice_and<is_callable<Predicate1>::value,
                  is_callable<Predicate2>::value>::value,
          and_predicate<Predicate1, Predicate2>>::type
operator&&(Predicate1 predicate1, Predicate2 predicate2)
{
    return and_predicate<Predicate1, Predicate2>{predicate1, predicate2};
}

is_callable is what I would like to implement.

share|improve this question
    
Why do you want to check if an object is callable? What is it you're trying to do? –  wilhelmtell Feb 24 '11 at 3:35
    
For example, write an overloaded operator&& that takes two predicates A and B and returns a predicate C such that C(x) iff. A(x) && B(x). Obviously, not restricting such an operator to callable objects causes havoc elsewhere. –  HighCommander4 Feb 24 '11 at 3:47
    
I like how C++ templates require you to not match things that you don't like, rather than match things you do. In D, this would just translate into a single preexisting template isCallable!(T), and its definition is nowhere as indirect as in C++... :) –  Mehrdad Feb 24 '11 at 5:11
1  
@HighCommander4: a templated operator() isn't even the worst, think of multiple overloads and SFINAE applied to some... –  Matthieu M. Feb 24 '11 at 7:30
2  
Here is a C++03 version: ideone.com/ur90o . Of course it only works for a specific set of argument types, but it works with any callable entities. That is, including function pointers, references, and class types with a surrogate call function. I assert that it's impossible to detect callability if you have no clue about what you are going to push in. What if the class has an op() that has an enable_if that makes it only accept a single specific class type? Simulated argument types won't do it. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Feb 26 '11 at 7:08
show 5 more comments

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The presence of a non-templated T::operator() for a given type T can be detected by:

template<typename C> // detect regular operator()
static char test(decltype(&C::operator()));

template<typename C> // worst match
static char (&test(...))[2];

static const bool value = (sizeof( test<T>(0)  )

The presence of a templated operator can be detected by:

template<typename F, typename A> // detect 1-arg operator()
static char test(int, decltype( (*(F*)0)( (*(A*)0) ) ) = 0);

template<typename F, typename A, typename B> // detect 2-arg operator()
static char test(int, decltype( (*(F*)0)( (*(A*)0), (*(B*)0) ) ) = 0);

// ... detect N-arg operator()

template<typename F, typename ...Args> // worst match
static char (&test(...))[2];

static const bool value = (sizeof( test<T, int>(0)  ) == 1) || 
                          (sizeof( test<T, int, int>(0)  ) == 1); // etc...

However, these two do not play nicely together, as decltype(&C::operator()) will produce an error if C has a templated function call operator. The solution is to run the sequence of checks against a templated operator first, and check for a regular operator() if and only if a templated one can not be found. This is done by specializing the non-templated check to a no-op if a templated one was found.

template<bool, typename T>
struct has_regular_call_operator
{
  template<typename C> // detect regular operator()
  static char test(decltype(&C::operator()));

  template<typename C> // worst match
  static char (&test(...))[2];

  static const bool value = (sizeof( test<T>(0)  ) == 1);
};

template<typename T>
struct has_regular_call_operator<true,T>
{
  static const bool value = true;
};

template<typename T>
struct has_call_operator
{
  template<typename F, typename A> // detect 1-arg operator()
  static char test(int, decltype( (*(F*)0)( (*(A*)0) ) ) = 0);

  template<typename F, typename A, typename B> // detect 2-arg operator()
  static char test(int, decltype( (*(F*)0)( (*(A*)0), (*(B*)0) ) ) = 0);

  template<typename F, typename A, typename B, typename C> // detect 3-arg operator()
  static char test(int, decltype( (*(F*)0)( (*(A*)0), (*(B*)0), (*(C*)0) ) ) = 0);

  template<typename F, typename ...Args> // worst match
  static char (&test(...))[2];

  static const bool OneArg = (sizeof( test<T, int>(0)  ) == 1);
  static const bool TwoArg = (sizeof( test<T, int, int>(0)  ) == 1);
  static const bool ThreeArg = (sizeof( test<T, int, int, int>(0)  ) == 1);

  static const bool HasTemplatedOperator = OneArg || TwoArg || ThreeArg;
  static const bool value = has_regular_call_operator<HasTemplatedOperator, T>::value;
};

If the arity is always one, as discussed above, then the check should be simpler. I do not see the need for any additional type traits or library facilities for this to work.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm.. In retrospect, I suppose those templated checks could simply use int instead... –  decltype Feb 26 '11 at 15:42
    
That works very well, thank you! –  HighCommander4 Mar 7 '11 at 0:14
    
This typedef lies if the functionoid's operator() can't be instantiated with int, but I don't think anything better can be made. –  Mooing Duck Jan 14 at 1:39
add comment

This is a really interesting question. I've been puzzled hard by it.

I think I managed to make a variation to Crazy Eddie's code that will allow any number of parameters, however, it does use variadic templates and it does require to specify the parameters you are expecting the "callable" object to be called with. Long story short, I got this running and working as expected on gcc 4.6.0:

EDIT: One could use the std::result_of utility as well, however it does not work because it requires a typename to disambiguate the std::result_of<..>::type which breaks the Sfinae.

#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>

template < typename PotentiallyCallable, typename... Args>
struct is_callable
{
  typedef char (&no)  [1];
  typedef char (&yes) [2];

  template < typename T > struct dummy;

  template < typename CheckType>
  static yes check(dummy<decltype(std::declval<CheckType>()(std::declval<Args>()...))> *);
  template < typename CheckType>
  static no check(...);

  enum { value = sizeof(check<PotentiallyCallable>(0)) == sizeof(yes) };
};

int f1(int,double) { return 0; };
typedef int(*f1_type)(int,double) ; //this is just to have a type to feed the template.

struct Foo { };

struct Bar {
  template <typename T>
  void operator()(T) { };
};

int main() {
  if( is_callable<f1_type,int,double>::value )
    std::cout << "f1 is callable!" << std::endl;
  if( is_callable<Foo>::value )
    std::cout << "Foo is callable!" << std::endl;
  if( is_callable<Bar,int>::value )
    std::cout << "Bar is callable with int!" << std::endl;
  if( is_callable<Bar,double>::value )
    std::cout << "Bar is callable with double!" << std::endl;
};

I hope this is what you are looking for because I don't think it is possible to do much more.

EDIT: For your use case, it is a partial solution, but it might help:

template <typename Predicate1, typename Predicate2>
struct and_predicate
{
    template <typename ArgT>
    enable_if<ice_and<is_callable<Predicate1,ArgT>::value,
                      is_callable<Predicate2,ArgT>::value>::value,
                      bool>::type operator()(const ArgT& arg)
    {
        return predicate1(arg) && predicate2(arg);
    }

    Predicate1 predicate1;
    Predicate2 predicate2;
};

template <typename Predicate1, typename Predicate2>
enable_if<ice_and<is_callable< Predicate1, boost::any >::value,
                  is_callable< Predicate2, boost::any >::value>::value,
                  and_predicate<Predicate1, Predicate2>>::type
operator&&(Predicate1 predicate1, Predicate2 predicate2)
{
    return and_predicate<Predicate1, Predicate2>{predicate1, predicate2};
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note C++0x already has the core of this as std::result_of, though I can't seem to find it in my GCC 4.5 install... –  GManNickG Feb 24 '11 at 5:13
    
+1 for the last sentence... –  Mehrdad Feb 24 '11 at 5:13
    
That's a nice attempt. Unfortunately, it still doesn't do what I need, because I don't know the parameters I expect to call it with (in the case of my operator&&, A or B may themselves have a templated operator(), so I cannot deduce their parameter types). –  HighCommander4 Feb 24 '11 at 5:18
1  
@GMan, yes I know about result_of, I should have pointed it out, but it also isn't available on gcc 4.6, at least it seems so. @HighCommander4: I think you are out of luck then, I don't see how you could check if a type is callable if you don't even know how you want to call it. Why would you? I really don't get it. You should maybe post a clearer exposition of the usage you need this for. –  Mikael Persson Feb 24 '11 at 5:18
    
@Mikael: Yeah. That's strange because this answer seems to contradict our own findings. –  GManNickG Feb 24 '11 at 5:20
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