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I read a book about how to extend object with a method: I was confused with the following code:

Array.prototype._m=Array.prototype.m ||
( Array.prototype.m=function(){
//codes
})
Object.prototype.m=Array.prototype._m

It's said that the code like this is safe and high compatibility.
But I can't see how it works
And why

Array.prototype.m=function(){}

is not safe enough Thanks a lot!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

@tylermwashburn explained it well.

Basically...

Array.prototype.m
Array.prototype._m
Object.prototype.m

...will all reference the same function. Either whatever was stored in Array.prototype.m or the new function if Array.prototype.m didn't exist.

I'd just add that it is really a bad idea to extend Object.prototype. It extends every object type in javascript.

I'd wonder about the book you're reading if that's what it suggested.

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What this is saying is if !!Array.prototype.m is true, then Array.prototype._m should equal Array.prototype.m.

If !!Array.prototype.m is false, the it sets Array.prototype.m, and then sets Array.prototype._m to it.

It then applies that method to Object.prototype.

Really this is just a long way of Object.prototype.m = Array.prototype.m.

The difference is that this makes sure it's defined first.

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What is the !! in front of Array.prototype.m for? Not not?! –  w3d Jun 30 '11 at 19:30
1  
@w3c It turns whatever's infront of it into a boolean. –  tylermwashburn Jun 30 '11 at 21:59

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