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I'm teaching myself Haskell and the best way to learn any programming language is to use it. My current "exercise" is an implementation of take. The pseudo-code is:

take(0, list) = [] --empty list
take(n, list) = const(head(list), take(n-1, tail(list))

What I've worked out in Haskell is:

myTake :: (Num a) => a -> [b] -> [b]
myTake 0 l = []
myTake n (l:ls) = l :  myTake n-1 ls

This doesn't compile when I load the file in GHCi. This is the error message I get:

Couldn't match expected type `[b]'
       against inferred type `[b1] -> [b1]'
In the second argument of `(:)', namely `myTake n - 1 ls'
In the expression: l : myTake n - 1 ls
In the definition of `myTake':
    myTake n (l : ls) = l : myTake n - 1 ls

My current Haskell resource is "Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!" and I've read the section on types several times trying to figure this out. Google has been unusually unhelpful too. I think that I don't entirely understand typing yet. Can anyone explain what's going wrong?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted
myTake n - 1 ls

is parsed like

(myTake n) - (1 ls)

because function application binds higher than any infix operator. Parenthesize it:

myTake (n - 1) ls
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that solved it. I'm glad it was just something simple like that. – T Suds Feb 24 '11 at 4:40
1  
As a rule of thumb, always parenthesize expression which are an argument to a prefix function, if they are more than just a variable name. – FUZxxl Feb 24 '11 at 18:29
1  
Note this is why x : f y works, because the function application f y binds more tightly than :, so it's as if you had parenthesized x : (f y) – Dan Burton Feb 24 '11 at 21:06
    
Actually the error message is this way because : binds more tightly than -, so it's parsed as (l : (myTake n)) - (1 ls). This is why it complains that the second argument of : is a function - myTake is only partially applied. – Porges Feb 25 '11 at 0:57

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