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Are there any shortcuts to (stringByAppendingString:) string concatenation in Objective-C or shortcuts for working with NSString or other objects in general?

For example, I'd like to make

NSString *myString = @"This";
NSString *test = [myString stringByAppendingString:@" is just a test"];

something more like

string myString = "This";
string test = myString + " is just a test";
share|improve this question
525  
Objective-C is so needlessly complex -_- Why can't I just do (string1 + string2)? Honestly... –  Supuhstar Jan 17 '12 at 21:53
19  
@Supuhstar duh, Because it's not your average quick'n'dirty scripting language and there is memory management to look after? –  NicolasMiari Jul 7 '12 at 15:31
10  
@Supuhstar How is the lack of a non-essential feature 'needlessly complex'? –  NicolasMiari Jul 20 '12 at 11:29
2  
Look here for an idea. –  Jordão Nov 16 '12 at 3:04
16  
@NicolasMiari This is not the only feature that Objective-C lacks. There are dozens of others. Quoting from the link Jordão posted: "Objective-C is, to be blunt, a primitive language. Compare it to any modern language and you quickly find it lacking." I agree. Objective-C (early 1980s) is C (early 1970s) with the addition of a very simple and not very type-safe kind of OOP. It's ok, but compared with Java or C#, it feels very old-fashioned. –  Jona Christopher Sahnwaldt Aug 15 '13 at 9:13

25 Answers 25

up vote 392 down vote accepted

Two answers I can think of... neither is particularly as pleasant as just having a concatenation operator.

First, use an NSMutableString, which has an appendString method, removing some of the need for extra temp strings.

Second, use an NSArray to concatenate via the componentsJoinedByString method.

share|improve this answer
25  
Although the other option has many upvotes, I think this is the best answer if you don't know all your strings upon construction. Every time you append a string, you're creating a lot of overhead. Using a mutable string removes that problem. –  Eli Dec 22 '09 at 1:25
15  
+1 Agree w @Eli. These are generally the best solutions. NSArray -componentsJoinedByString can be done in a single line pretty well: string = [[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"This", "Is", "A", "Test", nil] componentsJoinedByString:@" "]; –  Rob Napier Feb 16 '10 at 14:37
1  
+1 for this answer. [NSMutableString appendString] is more memory friendly than [NSString stringByAppendingStrings]. –  Pierre-David Belanger Sep 27 '11 at 14:22
2  
@RobNapier:Now with the new array literal syntax, it is even better. –  Amogh Talpallikar Jul 2 '13 at 7:12
7  
The [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@/%@/%@", three, two, one]; technique seems the most elegant. It should be the selected answer. –  countfloortiles Feb 21 at 19:39

An option:

[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@/%@/%@", one, two, three];

Another option:

I'm guessing you're not happy with multiple appends (a+b+c+d), in which case you could do:

NSLog(@"%@", [Util append:one, @" ", two, nil]); // "one two"
NSLog(@"%@", [Util append:three, @"/", two, @"/", one, nil]); // three/two/one

using something like

+ (NSString *) append:(id) first, ...
{
    NSString * result = @"";
    id eachArg;
    va_list alist;
    if(first)
    {
        result = [result stringByAppendingString:first];
        va_start(alist, first);
        while (eachArg = va_arg(alist, id)) 
        result = [result stringByAppendingString:eachArg];
        va_end(alist);
    }
    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
284  
+1 for the simple stringWithFormat solution –  dbr Jul 18 '09 at 5:56
18  
Your second solution is a lot nicer :) –  pablasso Aug 1 '09 at 3:26
6  
@pablasso Agreed. The Util method is pretty ugly. If you wanted such a thing, it should be done as a NSString category with a name like +stringByAppendingStrings:. Even a straight-up function with a name like NSStringForAppendedStrings(...) would be better than a static method in a class like Util (anything with "Util" in the name is likely poorly factored). The function is also better implemented with an NSMutableString and -appendString to avoid creating an unbounded set of temporary autoreleased NSStrings. –  Rob Napier Feb 16 '10 at 14:34
16  
A real oversight on Apple's part not to implement a simple concatenation operator... –  ChrisP May 25 '11 at 18:04
1  
+1 for the simple answer... you should move the stringWithFormat answer to the top of the three options. –  jsherk Jul 15 '12 at 18:53

If you have 2 NSString literals, you can also just do this:

NSString *joinedFromLiterals = @"ONE " @"MILLION " @"YEARS " @"DUNGEON!!!";

That's also useful for joining #defines:

#define STRINGA @"Also, I don't know "
#define STRINGB @"where food comes from."
#define JOINED STRINGA STRINGB

Enjoy.

share|improve this answer
    
You saved me, didn't knew about this syntax. A lot of complains but seems objc has the simplest way of concatenating. –  Cristi Băluță Nov 23 '12 at 19:15
6  
@CristiBăluță :) But this works only with literals not with dynamically created NSString instances. –  Johannes Fahrenkrug Nov 23 '12 at 19:23
    
Ouch, you're right. –  Cristi Băluță Nov 24 '12 at 12:01
4  
@Nils: It's just a short example snippet. Maybe those defines are needed in other places of the imaginary project. Also, I wouldn't agree with the statement in the first place. Often a definition is needed in lots of places in a project and undef'ing it would make no sense. –  Johannes Fahrenkrug Feb 5 '13 at 7:54
3  
You actually don't need the @s on the strings after the first. @"I" " really" " enjoy"... –  Kevin May 11 '13 at 17:49

I keep returning to this post and always end up sorting through the answers to find this simple solution that works with as many variables as needed:

[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@/%@/%@", three, two, one];

For example:

NSString *urlForHttpGet = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"http://example.com/login/username/%@/userid/%i", userName, userId];
share|improve this answer
2  
this is exactly what I am looking for + 1 –  Pramesh Jan 23 at 3:27

Well, as colon is kind of special symbol, but is part of method signature, it is possible to exted the NSString with category to add this non-idiomatic style of string concatenation:

[@"This " : @"feels " : @"almost like " : @"concatenation with operators"];

You can define as many colon separated arguments as you find useful... ;-)

For a good measure, I've also added concat: with variable arguments that takes nil terminated list of strings.

//  NSString+Concatenation.h

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface NSString (Concatenation)

- (NSString *):(NSString *)a;
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b;
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b :(NSString *)c;
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b :(NSString *)c :(NSString *)d;

- (NSString *)concat:(NSString *)strings, ...;

@end

//  NSString+Concatenation.m

#import "NSString+Concatenation.h"

@implementation NSString (Concatenation)

- (NSString *):(NSString *)a { return [self stringByAppendingString:a];}
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b { return [[self:a]:b];}
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b :(NSString *)c
    { return [[[self:a]:b]:c]; }
- (NSString *):(NSString *)a :(NSString *)b :(NSString *)c :(NSString *)d
    { return [[[[self:a]:b]:c]:d];}

- (NSString *)concat:(NSString *)strings, ...
{
    va_list args;
    va_start(args, strings);

    NSString *s;    
    NSString *con = [self stringByAppendingString:strings];

    while((s = va_arg(args, NSString *))) 
        con = [con stringByAppendingString:s];

    va_end(args);
    return con;
}
@end

//  NSString+ConcatenationTest.h

#import <SenTestingKit/SenTestingKit.h>
#import "NSString+Concatenation.h"

@interface NSString_ConcatenationTest : SenTestCase

@end

//  NSString+ConcatenationTest.m

#import "NSString+ConcatenationTest.h"

@implementation NSString_ConcatenationTest

- (void)testSimpleConcatenation 
{
    STAssertEqualObjects([@"a":@"b"], @"ab", nil);
    STAssertEqualObjects([@"a":@"b":@"c"], @"abc", nil);
    STAssertEqualObjects([@"a":@"b":@"c":@"d"], @"abcd", nil);
    STAssertEqualObjects([@"a":@"b":@"c":@"d":@"e"], @"abcde", nil);
    STAssertEqualObjects([@"this " : @"is " : @"string " : @"concatenation"],
     @"this is string concatenation", nil);
}

- (void)testVarArgConcatenation 
{
    NSString *concatenation = [@"a" concat:@"b", nil];
    STAssertEqualObjects(concatenation, @"ab", nil);

    concatenation = [concatenation concat:@"c", @"d", concatenation, nil];
    STAssertEqualObjects(concatenation, @"abcdab", nil);
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I'd appreciate if the downvoter provided his reasons in a comment... :-( –  Palimondo Mar 19 '12 at 9:18
23  
It is not good practice to downvote an answer (especially if it has been put a lot of effort in) without leaving a comment explaining why. Upvoted. –  Emil Mar 19 '12 at 15:08
2  
+1 It is rare to come across such a simple solution that can save you so much boiler plate code! I'm puzzled why Apply hasn't put this in the NSString a long time ago. –  KlausCPH Feb 27 '13 at 21:11
15  
I downvoted this a year ago because it's not a very good answer. To cope with concatenating a large number of strings, Palimondo's implementation requires either implementing a large number of very similar looking methods, or calling the methods several times, resulting in a large chunk of code that essentially just concatenates strings. Using this approach, you don't get any benefit over a simple stringWithFormat:. Not to mention the lack of named parameters which is not only non-standard but also confusing. –  FreeAsInBeer Mar 26 '13 at 12:57
1  
The original asker mentioned stringByAppendingString, and he never said anything about using more than two arguments. I like this answer better than the accepted one. It's pretty clever. –  9000 Jul 9 at 17:00

Use this way:

NSString *string1, *string2, *result;

string1 = @"This is ";
string2 = @"my string.";

result = [result stringByAppendingString:string1];
result = [result stringByAppendingString:string2];

OR

result = [result stringByAppendingString:@"This is "];
result = [result stringByAppendingString:@"my string."];
share|improve this answer
23  
You do realize that you're suggesting the exact thing he wanted not to do, right? –  SilverSideDown Jul 24 '12 at 14:57
4  
But it's exactly what I'm looking for! –  Chris Conway Feb 20 '13 at 12:49

When building requests for web services, I find doing something like the following is very easy and makes concatenation readable in Xcode:

NSString* postBody = {
    @"<?xml version=\"1.0\" encoding=\"utf-8\"?>"
    @"<soap:Envelope xmlns:xsi=\"http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance\" xmlns:xsd=\"http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema\" xmlns:soap=\"http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/envelope/\">"
    @" <soap:Body>"
    @"  <WebServiceMethod xmlns=\"\">"
    @"   <parameter>test</parameter>"
    @"  </WebServiceMethod>"
    @" </soap:Body>"
    @"</soap:Envelope>"
};
share|improve this answer
    
For an objective-c noob can you explain what this syntax is doing? Is this creating an array of strings and joining them somewhow? A reference to any docs would be cool too. –  Norman H May 25 '12 at 13:05
2  
@NormanH: This is actually part of the C language. After a little digging, I was able to find this. It states under the "String concatenation" phase: All adjacent string and wide-string literals are concatenated. For example, "String " "concatenation" becomes "String concatenation". –  FreeAsInBeer May 25 '12 at 18:58
    
Perfect. Thank you! –  psynnott Jan 27 '13 at 11:37

Shortcut by creating AppendString (AS) macro ...

#define AS(A,B)    [(A) stringByAppendingString:(B)]
NSString *myString = @"This"; NSString *test = AS(myString,@" is just a test");
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! I still think the Util above is a much more elegant solution; you can append only one string with this macro, right? –  typeoneerror Jul 18 '09 at 13:02
1  
True, the AS macro above does one append per line of code. If multiple appends are a common need, then more macros can be created. For example, a macro to append two strings: <pre> #define A2S(A,B,C) [[(A) stringByAppendingString:(B)] stringByAppendingString:(C)] </pre> –  Jim Logan Jul 18 '09 at 23:54
2  
Or, simply shorten the typing required with a macro like "#define AS stringByAppendingString", then just use "AS" where your would normally type "stringByAppendingString", and enjoy multiple appends per line of code. –  Jim Logan Jul 19 '09 at 0:02
    
woo this helped me, and i don't even know objective-c! –  tarnfeld Dec 31 '09 at 9:29
13  
The problem with these macros is that they undermine one of the major goals of Objective-C, which is readability. It's extremely unclear what "AS" does. Saving a few keystrokes (most of which are handled with autocompletion) at the expense of readability is seldom a good trade-off. There are exceptions (the @"" syntax is much more readable than having to use +stringWithUTF8String: every time), but the goal should still be readability rather than simply brevity. You write once, but you debug forever. –  Rob Napier Feb 16 '10 at 14:42

create a method...

- (NSString *)strCat: (NSString *)one: (NSString *)two
{
NSString *myString;
myString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@%@", one , two];
return myString;
}

Then, in whatever function you need it in, set your string or textfield or whatever to the return value of this function.

Or what you can do to make a shortcut is convert the NSString into a c++ string and use the '+' there.

Hope this helps!!!

share|improve this answer
NSString *label1 = @"Process Name: ";
NSString *label2 = @"Process Id: ";
NSString *processName = [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processName];
NSString *processID = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processIdentifier]];
NSString *testConcat = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@ %@ %@", label1, processName, label2, processID];
share|improve this answer

Here's a simple way, using the new array literal syntax:

NSString * s = [@[@"one ", @"two ", @"three"] componentsJoinedByString:@""];
                  ^^^^^^^ create array ^^^^^
                                               ^^^^^^^ concatenate ^^^^^
share|improve this answer

Macro:

// stringConcat(...)
//     A shortcut for concatenating strings (or objects' string representations).
//     Input: Any number of non-nil NSObjects.
//     Output: All arguments concatenated together into a single NSString.

#define stringConcat(...) \
    [@[__VA_ARGS__] componentsJoinedByString:@""]

Test Cases:

- (void)testStringConcat {
    NSString *actual;

    actual = stringConcat(); //might not make sense, but it's still a valid expression.
    STAssertEqualObjects(@"", actual, @"stringConcat");

    actual = stringConcat(@"A");
    STAssertEqualObjects(@"A", actual, @"stringConcat");

    actual = stringConcat(@"A", @"B");
    STAssertEqualObjects(@"AB", actual, @"stringConcat");

    actual = stringConcat(@"A", @"B", @"C");
    STAssertEqualObjects(@"ABC", actual, @"stringConcat");

    // works on all NSObjects (not just strings):
    actual = stringConcat(@1, @" ", @2, @" ", @3);
    STAssertEqualObjects(@"1 2 3", actual, @"stringConcat");
}

Alternate macro: (if you wanted to enforce a minimum number of arguments)

// stringConcat(...)
//     A shortcut for concatenating strings (or objects' string representations).
//     Input: Two or more non-nil NSObjects.
//     Output: All arguments concatenated together into a single NSString.

#define stringConcat(str1, str2, ...) \
    [@[ str1, str2, ##__VA_ARGS__] componentsJoinedByString:@""];
share|improve this answer
NSString *myString = @"This";
NSString *test = [myString stringByAppendingString:@" is just a test"];

After a couple of years now with Objective C I think this is the best way to work with Objective C to achieve what you are trying to achieve.

Start keying in "N" in your Xcode application and it autocompletes to "NSString". key in "str" and it autocompletes to "stringByAppendingString". So the keystrokes are quite limited.

Once you get the hang of hitting the "@" key and tabbing the process of writing readable code no longer becomes a problem. It is just a matter of adapting.

share|improve this answer

The only way to make c = [a stringByAppendingString: b] any shorter is to use autocomplete at around the st point. The + operator is part of C, which doesn't know about Objective-C objects.

share|improve this answer
NSString *label1 = @"Process Name: ";
NSString *label2 = @"Process Id: ";
NSString *processName = [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processName];
NSString *processID = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%d", [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] processIdentifier]];
NSString *testConcat = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@ %@ %@", label1, processName, label2, processID];
share|improve this answer
NSString *result=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@", @"Hello", @"World"];
share|improve this answer

How about shortening stringByAppendingString and use a #define:

#define and stringByAppendingString

Thus you would use:

NSString* myString = [@"Hello " and @"world"];

Problem is that it only works for two strings, you're required to wrap additional brackets for more appends:

NSString* myString = [[@"Hello" and: @" world"] and: @" again"];
share|improve this answer

I tried this code. it's worked for me.

NSMutableString * myString=[[NSMutableString alloc]init];
myString=[myString stringByAppendingString:@"first value"];
myString=[myString stringByAppendingString:@"second string"];
share|improve this answer
1  
You forgot * befor myString –  Egor Jun 2 '13 at 18:10

This is for better logging, and logging only - based on dicius excellent multiple argument method. I define a Logger class, and call it like so:

[Logger log: @"foobar ", @" asdads ", theString, nil];

Almost good, except having to end the var args with "nil" but I suppose there's no way around that in Objective-C.

Logger.h

@interface Logger : NSObject {
}
+ (void) log: (id) first, ...;
@end

Logger.m

@implementation Logger

+ (void) log: (id) first, ...
{
    // TODO: make efficient; handle arguments other than strings
    // thanks to @diciu http://stackoverflow.com/questions/510269/how-do-i-concatenate-strings-in-objective-c
    NSString * result = @"";
    id eachArg;
    va_list alist;
    if(first)
    {
        result = [result stringByAppendingString:first];
        va_start(alist, first);
        while (eachArg = va_arg(alist, id)) 
        {
            result = [result stringByAppendingString:eachArg];
        }
        va_end(alist);
    }
    NSLog(@"%@", result);
}

@end 

In order to only concat strings, I'd define a Category on NSString and add a static (+) concatenate method to it that looks exactly like the log method above except it returns the string. It's on NSString because it's a string method, and it's static because you want to create a new string from 1-N strings, not call it on any one of the strings that are part of the append.

share|improve this answer

Try stringWithFormat:

NSString *myString = [NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@ %@ %d", "The", "Answer", "Is", 42];
share|improve this answer
    
Why does this have 2 downvotes? Is it because this was already mentioned in another answer? –  Reimius Nov 30 '12 at 16:32

When dealing with strings often I find it easier to make the source file ObjC++, then I can concatenate std::strings using the second method shown in the question.

std::string stdstr = [nsstr UTF8String];

//easier to read and more portable string manipulation goes here...

NSString* nsstr = [NSString stringWithUTF8String:stdstr.c_str()];
share|improve this answer
    
This is an interesting answer. Look forward to trying this. –  typeoneerror Nov 15 '12 at 9:28

You can use NSArray as

NSString *string1=@"This"

NSString *string2=@"is just"

NSString *string3=@"a test"  

NSArray *myStrings = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:string1, string2, string3,nil];

NSString *fullLengthString = [myStrings componentsJoinedByString:@" "];

or

you can use

NSString *imageFullName=[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@ %@ %@.", string1,string2,string3];
share|improve this answer

Was trying the following in the lldb pane

[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@/%@/%@", three, two, one];

which errors.

instead use alloc and initWithFormat method:

[[NSString alloc] initWithFormat:@"%@/%@/%@", @"three", @"two", @"one"];
share|improve this answer
    
...wish I had enough reputation to comment but hope this helps somebody else. –  Anthony De Souza Apr 7 at 11:46

My preferred method is this:

NSString *firstString = @"foo";
NSString *secondString = @"bar";
NSString *thirdString = @"baz";

NSString *joinedString = [@[firstString, secondString, thirdString] join];

You can achieve it by adding the join method to NSArray with a category:

#import "NSArray+Join.h"
@implementation NSArray (Join)
-(NSString *)join
{
    return [self componentsJoinedByString:@""];
}
@end

@[] it's the short definition for NSArray, I think this is the fastest method to concatenate strings.

If you don't want to use the category, use directly the componentsJoinedByString: method:

NSString *joinedString = [@[firstString, secondString, thirdString] componentsJoinedByString:@""];
share|improve this answer
listOfCatalogIDs =[@[@"id[]=",listOfCatalogIDs] componentsJoinedByString:@""];
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