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Say I have an interface IFoo and I want all subclasses of IFoo to override Object's ToString method. Is this possible?

Simply adding the method signature to IFoo as such doesn't work:

interface IFoo
{
    String ToString();
}

since all the subclasses extend Object and provide an implementation that way, so the compiler doesn't complain about it. Any suggestions?

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stackoverflow.com/questions/239408/… <--? same? or just very similar? –  Ric Tokyo Feb 4 '09 at 7:25

6 Answers 6

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I don't believe you can do it with an interface. You can use an abstract base class though:

public abstract class Base
{
    public abstract override string ToString(); 
}
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I was hoping stick with interfaces since I've already gotten them written, guess I'll have to bite the bullet and switch abstract classes. Thanks. –  rjohnston Feb 4 '09 at 10:14
abstract class Foo
{
    public override abstract string ToString();
}

class Bar : Foo
{
    // need to override ToString()
}
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Question was "can I do this with an interface?", not "how do I do this?", but thanks anyway. –  rjohnston Feb 4 '09 at 10:13

Jon & Andrew: That abstract trick is really useful; I had no idea you could end the chain by declaring it as abstract. Cheers :)

In the past when I've required that ToString() be overriden in derived classes, I've always used a pattern like the following:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public abstract string ToStringImpl();

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return ToStringImpl();
    }    
}
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I know this doesn't answer your question, but since there is no way to do what you're asking for, I thought I'd share my own approach for others to see.

I use a hybrid of Mark and Andrew's proposed solutions.

In my application, all domain-entities derive from an abstract base-class:

public abstract class Entity
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Returns a <see cref="System.String"/> that represents this instance.
    /// </summary>
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return this is IHasDescription
                   ? ((IHasDescription) this).EntityDescription
                   : base.ToString();
    }
}

The interface itself only defines a simple accessor:

public interface IHasDescription : IEntity
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Creates a description (in english) of the Entity.
    /// </summary>
    string EntityDescription { get; }
}

So now there's a fall-back mechanism built in - or in other words, an Entity that implements IHasDescription must provide the EntityDescription, but any Entity can still convert to a string.

I know this isn't radically different from the other solutions proposed here, but I like the idea of minimizing the responsibility of the base Entity type, so that implementing the description-interface remains optional, but you're forced to actually implement the description-method if you're implementing the interface.

IMHO, interfaces that are implemented by the object base-class should not "count" as implemented - it would be nice to have a compiler option for that, but, oh well...

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You could use as instead of is to avoid a second cast. –  c45207 Jul 15 '13 at 23:54

I don't think you can force any sub-class to override any of the base-class's virtual methods unless those methods are abstract.

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Implementing an interface method implicitly seals the method (as well as overriding it). So, unless you tell it otherwise, the first implementation of an interface ends the override chain in C#.

Essential .NET

Abstract class = your friend

Check this question

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