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Is there a way of reading one single character from the user input? For instance, they press one key at the terminal and it is returned (sort of like getch()). I know there's a function in Windows for it, but I'd like something that is cross-platform.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 75 down vote accepted

Here's a link to a site that says how you can read a single character in both Windows and Linux: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/134892/

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the
screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): return self.impl()


class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty, sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys, tty, termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()
share|improve this answer
8  
code seems short enough that you could just include it, but +1 for finding a good (cross-platform) answer so quickly. –  John Mulder Feb 4 '09 at 7:24
1  
Does it handle non-latin (e.g., cyrillic) letters well? I am having a problem with that and can't figure out, if it is my mistake, or not. –  Phlya Mar 29 '13 at 18:01
    
@Ilya: look at how getpass() that supports non-ascii characters is implemented e.g., it uses getwch() on Windows –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 6 '14 at 10:42
1  
I don't like how the ImportError exception is used like some kind of if-statement; why not call platform.system() to check the OS? –  Seismoid Sep 21 '14 at 20:19
1  
@Seismoid: Asking for forgiveness is generally considered better, see stackoverflow.com/questions/12265451/… –  dirkjot Apr 21 at 11:18
sys.stdin.read(1)

will basically read 1 byte from STDIN.

If you must use the method which does not wait for the \n you can use this code as suggested in previous answer:

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): return self.impl()


class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty, sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys, tty, termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()

(taken from http://code.activestate.com/recipes/134892/)

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8  
I find it odd that sys.stdin.read(1) waits for a \n, lol. Thanks for the submission, though. –  Evan Fosmark Feb 4 '09 at 8:00
1  
One character or one byte? That's not the same. –  chryss Feb 4 '09 at 15:08
2  
@Evan, that's because python is in line buffered mode by default –  John La Rooy Oct 13 '09 at 11:09
3  
Note that this code blocks you from using ^C or ^D! –  Tim R. Jun 26 '12 at 1:29
    
@EvanFosmark: it's not necessarily that sys.stdin.read(1) waits for \n, it's that the terminal program deciding when to send other characters to your program doesn't write them until it sees '\n' - how else would you be able to press backspace and correct what you're typing? (the serious answer to that is - teach the python program to implement the line control, keep a buffer, process backspaces, but that's a different world you may not want to buy into when just "reading a character", and could make your line handling different from all the other programs on your system.) –  Tony D Feb 21 '14 at 6:49

The ActiveState recipe quoted verbatim in two answers is over-engineered. It can be boiled down to this:

def _find_getch():
    try:
        import termios
    except ImportError:
        # Non-POSIX. Return msvcrt's (Windows') getch.
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch

    # POSIX system. Create and return a getch that manipulates the tty.
    import sys, tty
    def _getch():
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(fd)
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch

    return _getch

getch = _find_getch()
share|improve this answer

An alternative method:

import os
import sys    
import termios
import fcntl

def getch():
  fd = sys.stdin.fileno()

  oldterm = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
  newattr = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
  newattr[3] = newattr[3] & ~termios.ICANON & ~termios.ECHO
  termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSANOW, newattr)

  oldflags = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
  fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, oldflags | os.O_NONBLOCK)

  try:        
    while 1:            
      try:
        c = sys.stdin.read(1)
        break
      except IOError: pass
  finally:
    termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSAFLUSH, oldterm)
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, oldflags)
  return c

From this blog post.

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I think it gets extremely clunky at this point, and debugging on the different platforms is a big mess.

You'd be better off using something like pyglet, pygame, cocos2d - if you are doing something more elaborate than this and will need visuals, OR curses if you are going to work with the terminal.

Curses is standard: http://docs.python.org/library/curses.html

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2  
I strongly disagree with this. To use curses you have to initscr() the terminal which clears the screen. This is unwanted behavior if the user only wants to use curses to get userinput without \n. –  dman Jun 26 '13 at 20:22

Also worth trying is the readchar library, which is in part based on the ActiveState recipe mentioned in other answers.

Installation:

pip install readchar

Usage:

import readchar
print("Reading a char:")
print(repr(readchar.readchar()))
print("Reading a key:")
print(repr(readchar.readkey()))

Tested on Windows and Linux with Python 2.7.

On Windows, only keys which map to letters or ASCII control codes are supported (Backspace, Enter, Esc, Tab, Ctrl+letter). On GNU/Linux (depending on exact terminal, perhaps?) you also get Insert, Delete, Pg Up, Pg Dn, Home, End and F n keys... but then, there's issues separating these special keys from an Esc.

Caveat: Like with most (all?) answers in here, signal keys like Ctrl+C, Ctrl+D and Ctrl+Z are caught and returned (as '\x03', '\x04' and '\x1a' respectively); your program can be come difficult to abort.

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1  
Works with Python 3 on Linux as well. Much better than getch, because readchar allows printing to stdout while waiting for key (via threads or asyncio). –  wrobell Jun 5 at 20:54
    
Tested on Kubuntu Linux, this works perfectly and is very Pythonic. Thank you! –  dotancohen Aug 20 at 13:30

This code, based off here, will correctly raise KeyboardInterrupt and EOFError if Ctrl+C or Ctrl+D are pressed.

Should work on Windows and Linux. An OS X version is available from the original source.

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): 
        char = self.impl()
        if char == '\x03':
            raise KeyboardInterrupt
        elif char == '\x04':
            raise EOFError
        return char

class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty
        import sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys
        import tty
        import termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()
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This is NON-BLOCKING, reads a key and and stores it in keypress.key.

import Tkinter as tk


class Keypress:
    def __init__(self):
        self.root = tk.Tk()
        self.root.geometry('300x200')
        self.root.bind('<KeyPress>', self.onKeyPress)

    def onKeyPress(self, event):
        self.key = event.char

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.key == other

    def __str__(self):
        return self.key

in your programm

keypress = Keypress()

while something:
   do something
   if keypress == 'c':
        break
   elif keypress == 'i': 
       print('info')
   else:
       print("i dont understand %s" % keypress)
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3  
does this work for command line applications? –  ThorSummoner Jan 23 at 7:36
    
Yes @ThorSummoner –  Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Mar 27 at 3:12
    
@ThorSummoner: This code has a number of problems — so no, it won't work for command line applications. –  martineau Aug 31 at 0:29
    
It runs for a command line application, given that the windows manager is running. –  Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Aug 31 at 17:36

This might be a use case for a context manager. Leaving aside allowances for Windows OS, here's my suggestion:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
# file: 'readchar.py'
"""
Implementation of a way to get a single character of input
without waiting for the user to hit <Enter>.
(OS is Linux, Ubuntu 14.04)
"""

import tty, sys, termios

class ReadChar():
    def __enter__(self):
        self.fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        self.old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(self.fd)
        tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
        return sys.stdin.read(1)
    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        termios.tcsetattr(self.fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, self.old_settings)

def test():
    while True:
        with ReadChar() as rc:
            char = rc
        if ord(char) <= 32:
            print("You entered character with ordinal {}."\
                        .format(ord(char)))
        else:
            print("You entered character '{}'."\
                        .format(char))
        if char in "^C^D":
            sys.exit()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    test()
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The curses package in python can be used to enter "raw" mode for character input from the terminal with just a few statements. Curses' main use is to take over the screen for output, which may not be what you want. This code snippet uses print() statements instead, which are usable, but you must be aware of how curses changes line endings attached to output.

#!/usr/bin/python3
# Demo of single char terminal input in raw mode with the curses package.
import sys, curses

def run_one_char(dummy):
    'Run until a carriage return is entered'
    char = ' '
    print('Welcome to curses', flush=True)
    while ord(char) != 13:
        char = one_char()

def one_char():
    'Read one character from the keyboard'
    print('\r? ', flush= True, end = '')

    ## A blocking single char read in raw mode. 
    char = sys.stdin.read(1)
    print('You entered %s\r' % char)
    return char

## Must init curses before calling any functions
curses.initscr()
## To make sure the terminal returns to its initial settings,
## and to set raw mode and guarantee cleanup on exit. 
curses.wrapper(run_one_char)
print('Curses be gone!')
share|improve this answer

Try this with pygame:

import pygame

keys = pygame.key.get_pressed()

if keys[pygame.K_SPACE]:
    d = "space key"

print "You pressed the", d, "."
share|improve this answer
    
That is a neat idea, but it doesn't work on the command line: pygame.error: video system not initialized –  dirkjot Apr 21 at 11:15

Try using this: http://home.wlu.edu/~levys/software/kbhit.py It's non-blocking (that means that you can have a while loop and detect a key press without stopping it) and cross-platform.

import os

# Windows
if os.name == 'nt':
    import msvcrt

# Posix (Linux, OS X)
    else:
        import sys
        import termios
        import atexit
        from select import select


class KBHit:

    def __init__(self):
        '''Creates a KBHit object that you can call to do various keyboard things.'''

        if os.name == 'nt':
            pass

        else:

            # Save the terminal settings
            self.fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
            self.new_term = termios.tcgetattr(self.fd)
            self.old_term = termios.tcgetattr(self.fd)

            # New terminal setting unbuffered
            self.new_term[3] = (self.new_term[3] & ~termios.ICANON & ~termios.ECHO)
            termios.tcsetattr(self.fd, termios.TCSAFLUSH, self.new_term)

            # Support normal-terminal reset at exit
            atexit.register(self.set_normal_term)


    def set_normal_term(self):
        ''' Resets to normal terminal.  On Windows this is a no-op.
        '''

        if os.name == 'nt':
            pass

        else:
            termios.tcsetattr(self.fd, termios.TCSAFLUSH, self.old_term)


    def getch(self):
        ''' Returns a keyboard character after kbhit() has been called.
            Should not be called in the same program as getarrow().
        '''

        s = ''

        if os.name == 'nt':
            return msvcrt.getch().decode('utf-8')

        else:
            return sys.stdin.read(1)


    def getarrow(self):
        ''' Returns an arrow-key code after kbhit() has been called. Codes are
        0 : up
        1 : right
        2 : down
        3 : left
        Should not be called in the same program as getch().
        '''

        if os.name == 'nt':
            msvcrt.getch() # skip 0xE0
            c = msvcrt.getch()
            vals = [72, 77, 80, 75]

        else:
            c = sys.stdin.read(3)[2]
            vals = [65, 67, 66, 68]

        return vals.index(ord(c.decode('utf-8')))


    def kbhit(self):
        ''' Returns True if keyboard character was hit, False otherwise.
        '''
        if os.name == 'nt':
            return msvcrt.kbhit()

        else:
            dr,dw,de = select([sys.stdin], [], [], 0)
            return dr != []

An example to use this:

import kbhit

kb = kbhit.KBHit()

while(True): 
    print("Key not pressed") #Do something
    if kb.kbhit(): #If a key is pressed:
        k_in = kb.getch() #Detect what key was pressed
        print("You pressed ", k_in, "!") #Do something
kb.set_normal_term()

Or you could use the getch module from PyPi. But this would block the while loop

share|improve this answer

The answers here were informative, however I also wanted a way to get key presses asynchronously and fire off key presses in separate events, all in a thread-safe, cross-platform way. PyGame was also too bloated for me. So I made the following (in Python 2.7 but I suspect it's easily portable), which I figured I'd share here in case it was useful for anyone else. I stored this in a file named keyPress.py.

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the
screen. From http://code.activestate.com/recipes/134892/"""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            try:
                self.impl = _GetchMacCarbon()
            except(AttributeError, ImportError):
                self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): return self.impl()


class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty, sys, termios # import termios now or else you'll get the Unix version on the Mac

    def __call__(self):
        import sys, tty, termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch

class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()

class _GetchMacCarbon:
    """
    A function which returns the current ASCII key that is down;
    if no ASCII key is down, the null string is returned.  The
    page http://www.mactech.com/macintosh-c/chap02-1.html was
    very helpful in figuring out how to do this.
    """
    def __init__(self):
        import Carbon
        Carbon.Evt #see if it has this (in Unix, it doesn't)

    def __call__(self):
        import Carbon
        if Carbon.Evt.EventAvail(0x0008)[0]==0: # 0x0008 is the keyDownMask
            return ''
        else:
            #
            # The event contains the following info:
            # (what,msg,when,where,mod)=Carbon.Evt.GetNextEvent(0x0008)[1]
            #
            # The message (msg) contains the ASCII char which is
            # extracted with the 0x000000FF charCodeMask; this
            # number is converted to an ASCII character with chr() and
            # returned
            #
            (what,msg,when,where,mod)=Carbon.Evt.GetNextEvent(0x0008)[1]
            return chr(msg & 0x000000FF)

import threading


# From  http://stackoverflow.com/a/2022629/2924421
class Event(list):
    def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        for f in self:
            f(*args, **kwargs)

    def __repr__(self):
        return "Event(%s)" % list.__repr__(self)            


def getKey():
    inkey = _Getch()
    import sys
    for i in xrange(sys.maxint):
        k=inkey()
        if k<>'':break
    return k

class KeyCallbackFunction():
    callbackParam = None
    actualFunction = None

    def __init__(self, actualFunction, callbackParam):
        self.actualFunction = actualFunction
        self.callbackParam = callbackParam

    def doCallback(self, inputKey):
        if not self.actualFunction is None:
            if self.callbackParam is None:
                callbackFunctionThread = threading.Thread(target=self.actualFunction, args=(inputKey,))
            else:
                callbackFunctionThread = threading.Thread(target=self.actualFunction, args=(inputKey,self.callbackParam))

            callbackFunctionThread.daemon = True
            callbackFunctionThread.start()



class KeyCapture():


    gotKeyLock = threading.Lock()
    gotKeys = []
    gotKeyEvent = threading.Event()

    keyBlockingSetKeyLock = threading.Lock()

    addingEventsLock = threading.Lock()
    keyReceiveEvents = Event()


    keysGotLock = threading.Lock()
    keysGot = []

    keyBlockingKeyLockLossy = threading.Lock()
    keyBlockingKeyLossy = None
    keyBlockingEventLossy = threading.Event()

    keysBlockingGotLock = threading.Lock()
    keysBlockingGot = []
    keyBlockingGotEvent = threading.Event()



    wantToStopLock = threading.Lock()
    wantToStop = False

    stoppedLock = threading.Lock()
    stopped = True

    isRunningEvent = False

    getKeyThread = None

    keyFunction = None
    keyArgs = None

    # Begin capturing keys. A seperate thread is launched that
    # captures key presses, and then these can be received via get,
    # getAsync, and adding an event via addEvent. Note that this
    # will prevent the system to accept keys as normal (say, if
    # you are in a python shell) because it overrides that key
    # capturing behavior.

    # If you start capture when it's already been started, a
    # InterruptedError("Keys are still being captured")
    # will be thrown

    # Note that get(), getAsync() and events are independent, so if a key is pressed:
    #
    # 1: Any calls to get() that are waiting, with lossy on, will return
    #    that key
    # 2: It will be stored in the queue of get keys, so that get() with lossy
    #    off will return the oldest key pressed not returned by get() yet.
    # 3: All events will be fired with that key as their input
    # 4: It will be stored in the list of getAsync() keys, where that list
    #    will be returned and set to empty list on the next call to getAsync().
    # get() call with it, aand add it to the getAsync() list.
    def startCapture(self, keyFunction=None, args=None):
        # Make sure we aren't already capturing keys
        self.stoppedLock.acquire()
        if not self.stopped:
            self.stoppedLock.release()
            raise InterruptedError("Keys are still being captured")
            return
        self.stopped = False
        self.stoppedLock.release()

        # If we have captured before, we need to allow the get() calls to actually
        # wait for key presses now by clearing the event
        if self.keyBlockingEventLossy.is_set():
            self.keyBlockingEventLossy.clear()

        # Have one function that we call every time a key is captured, intended for stopping capture
        # as desired
        self.keyFunction = keyFunction
        self.keyArgs = args

        # Begin capturing keys (in a seperate thread)
        self.getKeyThread = threading.Thread(target=self._threadProcessKeyPresses)
        self.getKeyThread.daemon = True
        self.getKeyThread.start()

        # Process key captures (in a seperate thread)
        self.getKeyThread = threading.Thread(target=self._threadStoreKeyPresses)
        self.getKeyThread.daemon = True
        self.getKeyThread.start()


    def capturing(self):
        self.stoppedLock.acquire()
        isCapturing = not self.stopped
        self.stoppedLock.release()
        return isCapturing
    # Stops the thread that is capturing keys on the first opporunity
    # has to do so. It usually can't stop immediately because getting a key
    # is a blocking process, so this will probably stop capturing after the
    # next key is pressed.
    #
    # However, Sometimes if you call stopCapture it will stop before starting capturing the
    # next key, due to multithreading race conditions. So if you want to stop capturing
    # reliably, call stopCapture in a function added via addEvent. Then you are
    # guaranteed that capturing will stop immediately after the rest of the callback
    # functions are called (before starting to capture the next key).
    def stopCapture(self):
        self.wantToStopLock.acquire()
        self.wantToStop = True 
        self.wantToStopLock.release()

    # Takes in a function that will be called every time a key is pressed (with that
    # key passed in as the first paramater in that function)
    def addEvent(self, keyPressEventFunction, args=None):   
        self.addingEventsLock.acquire()
        callbackHolder = KeyCallbackFunction(keyPressEventFunction, args)
        self.keyReceiveEvents.append(callbackHolder.doCallback)
        self.addingEventsLock.release()
    def clearEvents(self):
        self.addingEventsLock.acquire()
        self.keyReceiveEvents = Event()
        self.addingEventsLock.release()
    # Gets a key captured by this KeyCapture, blocking until a key is pressed.
    # There is an optional lossy paramater:
    # If True all keys before this call are ignored, and the next pressed key
    #   will be returned.
    # If False this will return the oldest key captured that hasn't
    #   been returned by get yet. False is the default.
    def get(self, lossy=False):
        if lossy:
            # Wait for the next key to be pressed
            self.keyBlockingEventLossy.wait()
            self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.acquire()
            keyReceived = self.keyBlockingKeyLossy
            self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.release()
            return keyReceived
        else:
            while True:
                # Wait until a key is pressed
                self.keyBlockingGotEvent.wait()

                # Get the key pressed
                readKey = None
                self.keysBlockingGotLock.acquire()
                # Get a key if it exists
                if len(self.keysBlockingGot) != 0:
                    readKey = self.keysBlockingGot.pop(0)
                # If we got the last one, tell us to wait
                if len(self.keysBlockingGot) == 0:
                    self.keyBlockingGotEvent.clear()
                self.keysBlockingGotLock.release()

                # Process the key (if it actually exists)
                if not readKey is None:
                    return readKey

                # Exit if we are stopping
                self.wantToStopLock.acquire()
                if self.wantToStop:
                    self.wantToStopLock.release()
                    return None
                self.wantToStopLock.release()




    def clearGetList(self):
        self.keysBlockingGotLock.acquire()
        self.keysBlockingGot = []
        self.keysBlockingGotLock.release()

    # Gets a list of all keys pressed since the last call to getAsync, in order
    # from first pressed, second pressed, .., most recent pressed
    def getAsync(self):
        self.keysGotLock.acquire();
        keysPressedList = list(self.keysGot)
        self.keysGot = []
        self.keysGotLock.release()
        return keysPressedList

    def clearAsyncList(self):
        self.keysGotLock.acquire();
        self.keysGot = []
        self.keysGotLock.release();

    def _processKey(self, readKey):
        # Append to list for GetKeyAsync
        self.keysGotLock.acquire()
        self.keysGot.append(readKey)
        self.keysGotLock.release()

        # Call lossy blocking key events
        self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.acquire()
        self.keyBlockingKeyLossy = readKey
        self.keyBlockingEventLossy.set()
        self.keyBlockingEventLossy.clear()
        self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.release()

        # Call non-lossy blocking key events
        self.keysBlockingGotLock.acquire()
        self.keysBlockingGot.append(readKey)
        if len(self.keysBlockingGot) == 1:
            self.keyBlockingGotEvent.set()
        self.keysBlockingGotLock.release()

        # Call events added by AddEvent
        self.addingEventsLock.acquire()
        self.keyReceiveEvents(readKey)
        self.addingEventsLock.release()

    def _threadProcessKeyPresses(self):
        while True:
            # Wait until a key is pressed
            self.gotKeyEvent.wait()

            # Get the key pressed
            readKey = None
            self.gotKeyLock.acquire()
            # Get a key if it exists
            if len(self.gotKeys) != 0:
                readKey = self.gotKeys.pop(0)
            # If we got the last one, tell us to wait
            if len(self.gotKeys) == 0:
                self.gotKeyEvent.clear()
            self.gotKeyLock.release()

            # Process the key (if it actually exists)
            if not readKey is None:
                self._processKey(readKey)

            # Exit if we are stopping
            self.wantToStopLock.acquire()
            if self.wantToStop:
                self.wantToStopLock.release()
                break
            self.wantToStopLock.release()

    def _threadStoreKeyPresses(self):
        while True:
            # Get a key
            readKey = getKey()

            # Run the potential shut down function
            if not self.keyFunction is None:
                self.keyFunction(readKey, self.keyArgs)

            # Add the key to the list of pressed keys
            self.gotKeyLock.acquire()
            self.gotKeys.append(readKey)
            if len(self.gotKeys) == 1:
                self.gotKeyEvent.set()
            self.gotKeyLock.release()

            # Exit if we are stopping
            self.wantToStopLock.acquire()
            if self.wantToStop:
                self.wantToStopLock.release()
                self.gotKeyEvent.set()
                break
            self.wantToStopLock.release()


        # If we have reached here we stopped capturing

        # All we need to do to clean up is ensure that
        # all the calls to .get() now return None.
        # To ensure no calls are stuck never returning,
        # we will leave the event set so any tasks waiting
        # for it immediately exit. This will be unset upon
        # starting key capturing again.

        self.stoppedLock.acquire()

        # We also need to set this to True so we can start up
        # capturing again.
        self.stopped = True
        self.stopped = True

        self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.acquire()
        self.keyBlockingKeyLossy = None
        self.keyBlockingEventLossy.set()
        self.keyBlockingKeyLockLossy.release()

        self.keysBlockingGotLock.acquire()
        self.keyBlockingGotEvent.set()
        self.keysBlockingGotLock.release()

        self.stoppedLock.release()

The idea is that you can either simply call keyPress.getKey(), which will read a key from the keyboard, then return it.

If you want something more than that, I made a KeyCapture object. You can create one via something like keys = keyPress.KeyCapture().

Then there are three things you can do:

addEvent(functionName) takes in any function that takes in one parameter. Then every time a key is pressed, this function will be called with that key's string as it's input. These are ran in a separate thread, so you can block all you want in them and it won't mess up the functionality of the KeyCapturer nor delay the other events.

get() returns a key in the same blocking way as before. It is now needed here because the keys are being captured via the KeyCapture object now, so keyPress.getKey() would conflict with that behavior and both of them would miss some keys since only one key can be captured at a time. Also, say the user presses 'a', then 'b', you call get(), the the user presses 'c'. That get() call will immediately return 'a', then if you call it again it will return 'b', then 'c'. If you call it again it will block until another key is pressed. This ensures that you don't miss any keys, in a blocking way if desired. So in this way it's a little different than keyPress.getKey() from before

If you want the behavior of getKey() back, get(lossy=True) is like get(), except that it only returns keys pressed after the call to get(). So in the above example, get() would block until the user presses 'c', and then if you call it again it will block until another key is pressed.

getAsync() is a little different. It's designed for something that does a lot of processing, then occasionally comes back and checks which keys were pressed. Thus getAsync() returns a list of all the keys pressed since the last call to getAsync(), in order from oldest key pressed to most recent key pressed. It also doesn't block, meaning that if no keys have been pressed since the last call to getAsync(), an empty [] will be returned.

To actually start capturing keys, you need to call keys.startCapture() with your keys object made above. startCapture is non-blocking, and simply starts one thread that just records the key presses, and another thread to process those key presses. There are two threads to ensure that the thread that records key presses doesn't miss any keys.

If you want to stop capturing keys, you can call keys.stopCapture() and it will stop capturing keys. However, since capturing a key is a blocking operation, the thread capturing keys might capture one more key after calling stopCapture().

To prevent this, you can pass in an optional parameter(s) into startCapture(functionName, args) of a function that just does something like checks if a key equals 'c' and then exits. It's important that this function does very little before, for example, a sleep here will cause us to miss keys.

However, if stopCapture() is called in this function, key captures will be stopped immediately, without trying to capture any more, and that all get() calls will be returned immediately, with None if no keys have been pressed yet.

Also, since get() and getAsync() store all the previous keys pressed (until you retrieve them), you can call clearGetList() and clearAsyncList() to forget the keys previously pressed.

Note that get(), getAsync() and events are independent, so if a key is pressed: 1. One call to get() that is waiting, with lossy on, will return that key. The other waiting calls (if any) will continue waiting. 2. That key will be stored in the queue of get keys, so that get() with lossy off will return the oldest key pressed not returned by get() yet. 3. All events will be fired with that key as their input 4. That key will be stored in the list of getAsync() keys, where that lis twill be returned and set to empty list on the next call to getAsync()

If all this is too much, here is an example use case:

import keyPress
import time
import threading

def KeyPressed(k, printLock):
    printLock.acquire()
    print "Event: " + k
    printLock.release()
    time.sleep(4)
    printLock.acquire()
    print "Event after delay: " + k
    printLock.release()

def GetKeyBlocking(keys, printLock):    
    while keys.capturing():
        keyReceived = keys.get()
        time.sleep(1)
        printLock.acquire()
        if not keyReceived is None:
            print "Block " + keyReceived
        else:
            print "Block None"
        printLock.release()

def GetKeyBlockingLossy(keys, printLock):   
    while keys.capturing():
        keyReceived = keys.get(lossy=True)
        time.sleep(1)
        printLock.acquire()
        if not keyReceived is None:
            print "Lossy: " + keyReceived
        else:
            print "Lossy: None"
        printLock.release()

def CheckToClose(k, (keys, printLock)):
    printLock.acquire()
    print "Close: " + k
    printLock.release()
    if k == "c":
        keys.stopCapture()

printLock = threading.Lock()

print "Press a key:"
print "You pressed: " + keyPress.getKey()
print ""

keys = keyPress.KeyCapture()

keys.addEvent(KeyPressed, printLock)



print "Starting capture"

keys.startCapture(CheckToClose, (keys, printLock))

getKeyBlockingThread = threading.Thread(target=GetKeyBlocking, args=(keys, printLock))
getKeyBlockingThread.daemon = True
getKeyBlockingThread.start()


getKeyBlockingThreadLossy = threading.Thread(target=GetKeyBlockingLossy, args=(keys, printLock))
getKeyBlockingThreadLossy.daemon = True
getKeyBlockingThreadLossy.start()

while keys.capturing():
    keysPressed = keys.getAsync()
    printLock.acquire()
    if keysPressed != []:
        print "Async: " + str(keysPressed)
    printLock.release()
    time.sleep(1)

print "done capturing"

It is working well for me from the simple test I made, but I will happily take others feedback as well if there is something I missed.

I posted this here as well.

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