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Is there a way of reading one single character from the user input? For instance, they press one key at the terminal and it is returned. Sort of like getch(). I know that there is a function in windows for it, but I'd like something that is cross-platform.

Thanks.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 53 down vote accepted

Here's a link to a site that says how you can read a single character in both Windows and Linux: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/134892/

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the
screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): return self.impl()


class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty, sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys, tty, termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()
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8  
code seems short enough that you could just include it, but +1 for finding a good (cross-platform) answer so quickly. –  John Mulder Feb 4 '09 at 7:24
1  
Does it handle non-latin (e.g., cyrillic) letters well? I am having a problem with that and can't figure out, if it is my mistake, or not. –  Phlya Mar 29 '13 at 18:01
    
@Ilya: look at how getpass() that supports non-ascii characters is implemented e.g., it uses getwch() on Windows –  J.F. Sebastian Apr 6 '14 at 10:42
    
This is really helpful. If, instead of doing return self.impl(), you create a for loop and call self.impl() 3 times, you can get arrow keys and other escape sequences from the keyboard as well. –  JFA Jun 30 '14 at 22:39
    
I don't like how the ImportError exception is used like some kind of if-statement; why not call platform.system() to check the OS? –  Seismoid Sep 21 '14 at 20:19
sys.stdin.read(1)

will basically read 1 byte from STDIN.

If you must use the method which does not wait for the \n you can use this code as suggested in previous answer:

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): return self.impl()


class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty, sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys, tty, termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()

(taken from http://code.activestate.com/recipes/134892/)

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8  
I find it odd that sys.stdin.read(1) waits for a \n, lol. Thanks for the submission, though. –  Evan Fosmark Feb 4 '09 at 8:00
1  
One character or one byte? That's not the same. –  chryss Feb 4 '09 at 15:08
2  
@Evan, that's because python is in line buffered mode by default –  John La Rooy Oct 13 '09 at 11:09
2  
Note that this code blocks you from using ^C or ^D! –  Tim R. Jun 26 '12 at 1:29
    
@EvanFosmark: it's not necessarily that sys.stdin.read(1) waits for \n, it's that the terminal program deciding when to send other characters to your program doesn't write them until it sees '\n' - how else would you be able to press backspace and correct what you're typing? (the serious answer to that is - teach the python program to implement the line control, keep a buffer, process backspaces, but that's a different world you may not want to buy into when just "reading a character", and could make your line handling different from all the other programs on your system.) –  Tony D Feb 21 '14 at 6:49

The ActiveState recipe quoted verbatim in two answers is over-engineered. It can be boiled down to this:

def _find_getch():
    try:
        import termios
    except ImportError:
        # Non-POSIX. Return msvcrt's (Windows') getch.
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch

    # POSIX system. Create and return a getch that manipulates the tty.
    import sys, tty
    def _getch():
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(fd)
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch

    return _getch

getch = _find_getch()
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An alternative method:

import os
import sys    
import termios
import fcntl

def getch():
  fd = sys.stdin.fileno()

  oldterm = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
  newattr = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
  newattr[3] = newattr[3] & ~termios.ICANON & ~termios.ECHO
  termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSANOW, newattr)

  oldflags = fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_GETFL)
  fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, oldflags | os.O_NONBLOCK)

  try:        
    while 1:            
      try:
        c = sys.stdin.read(1)
        break
      except IOError: pass
  finally:
    termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSAFLUSH, oldterm)
    fcntl.fcntl(fd, fcntl.F_SETFL, oldflags)
  return c

From this blog post.

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I think it gets extremely clunky at this point, and debugging on the different platforms is a big mess.

You'd be better off using something like pyglet, pygame, cocos2d - if you are doing something more elaborate than this and will need visuals, OR curses if you are going to work with the terminal.

Curses is standard: http://docs.python.org/library/curses.html

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2  
I strongly disagree with this. To use curses you have to initscr() the terminal which clears the screen. This is unwanted behavior if the user only wants to use curses to get userinput without \n. –  dman Jun 26 '13 at 20:22

This code, based off here, will correctly raise KeyboardInterrupt and EOFError if Ctrl+C or Ctrl+D are pressed.

Should work on Windows and Linux. An OS X version is available from the original source.

class _Getch:
    """Gets a single character from standard input.  Does not echo to the screen."""
    def __init__(self):
        try:
            self.impl = _GetchWindows()
        except ImportError:
            self.impl = _GetchUnix()

    def __call__(self): 
        char = self.impl()
        if char == '\x03':
            raise KeyboardInterrupt
        elif char == '\x04':
            raise EOFError
        return char

class _GetchUnix:
    def __init__(self):
        import tty
        import sys

    def __call__(self):
        import sys
        import tty
        import termios
        fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(fd)
        try:
            tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
            ch = sys.stdin.read(1)
        finally:
            termios.tcsetattr(fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, old_settings)
        return ch


class _GetchWindows:
    def __init__(self):
        import msvcrt

    def __call__(self):
        import msvcrt
        return msvcrt.getch()


getch = _Getch()
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This is NON-BLOCKING, reads a key and and stores it in keypress.key.

import Tkinter as tk


class Keypress:
    def __init__(self):
        self.root = tk.Tk()
        self.root.geometry('300x200')
        self.root.bind('<KeyPress>', self.onKeyPress)

    def onKeyPress(self, event):
        self.key = event.char

    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.key == other

    def __str__(self):
        return self.key

in your programm

keypress = Keypress()

while something:
   do something
   if keypress == 'c':
        break
   elif keypress == 'i': 
       print('info')
   else:
       print("i dont understand %s" % keypress)
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1  
does this work for command line applications? –  ThorSummoner Jan 23 at 7:36
    
Yes @ThorSummoner –  Davoud Taghawi-Nejad Mar 27 at 3:12

Also worth trying is the readchar library, which is in part based on the ActiveState recipe mentioned in other answers.

Installation:

pip install readchar

Usage:

import readchar
print("Reading a char:")
print(repr(readchar.readchar()))
print("Reading a key:")
print(repr(readchar.readkey()))

Tested on Windows and Linux with Python 2.7.

On Windows, only keys which map to letters or ASCII control codes are supported (Backspace, Enter, Esc, Tab, Ctrl+letter). On GNU/Linux (depending on exact terminal, perhaps?) you also get Insert, Delete, Pg Up, Pg Dn, Home, End and F n keys... but then, there's issues separating these special keys from an Esc.

Caveat: Like with most (all?) answers in here, signal keys like Ctrl+C, Ctrl+D and Ctrl+Z are caught and returned (as '\x03', '\x04' and '\x1a' respectively); your program can be come difficult to abort.

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This might be a use case for a context manager. Leaving aside allowances for Windows OS, here's my suggestion:

#!/usr/bin/env python3
# file: 'readchar.py'
"""
Implementation of a way to get a single character of input
without waiting for the user to hit <Enter>.
(OS is Linux, Ubuntu 14.04)
"""

import tty, sys, termios

class ReadChar():
    def __enter__(self):
        self.fd = sys.stdin.fileno()
        self.old_settings = termios.tcgetattr(self.fd)
        tty.setraw(sys.stdin.fileno())
        return sys.stdin.read(1)
    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
        termios.tcsetattr(self.fd, termios.TCSADRAIN, self.old_settings)

def test():
    while True:
        with ReadChar() as rc:
            char = rc
        if ord(char) <= 32:
            print("You entered character with ordinal {}."\
                        .format(ord(char)))
        else:
            print("You entered character '{}'."\
                        .format(char))
        if char in "^C^D":
            sys.exit()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    test()
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The curses package in python can be used to enter "raw" mode for character input from the terminal with just a few statements. Curses' main use is to take over the screen for output, which may not be what you want. This code snippet uses print() statements instead, which are usable, but you must be aware of how curses changes line endings attached to output.

#!/usr/bin/python3
# Demo of single char terminal input in raw mode with the curses package.
import sys, curses

def run_one_char(dummy):
    'Run until a carriage return is entered'
    char = ' '
    print('Welcome to curses', flush=True)
    while ord(char) != 13:
        char = one_char()

def one_char():
    'Read one character from the keyboard'
    print('\r? ', flush= True, end = '')

    ## A blocking single char read in raw mode. 
    char = sys.stdin.read(1)
    print('You entered %s\r' % char)
    return char

## Must init curses before calling any functions
curses.initscr()
## To make sure the terminal returns to its initial settings,
## and to set raw mode and guarantee cleanup on exit. 
curses.wrapper(run_one_char)
print('Curses be gone!')
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Try this with pygame:

import pygame

keys = pygame.key.get_pressed()

if keys[pygame.K_SPACE]:
    d = "space key"

print "You pressed the", d, "."
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