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I'm currently constructing loggers (with configgy) like this:

class MyClass {
  private val log = Logger.get(classOf[MyClass])
}

I would like to avoid repeating "MyClass" as in classOf[MyClass] (for example I want to quickly copy paste the log definition line, without smart IDE expanding the template with the class name), but I don't want to use the dynamic class of the current object, like:

class MyClass {
  private val log = Logger.get(this.getClass)
}

EDIT: because this way instances of subclasses will have the subclass class object passed to the parent logger:

class MyClass {
  private val log = Logger.get(this.getClass)
  def doit = log.info("doing")
}
class SubClass extends MyClass {
}

new SubClass().doit

will use the logger configured for SubClass, not MyClass as I want.

Is there a way to have some fixed expression which somehow yields the class which is being defined at that point?

share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example showing a situation where this.getClass isn't what you want? Are you talking about in the context of inheritance? –  Eric Bowman - abstracto - Feb 24 '11 at 13:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The short answer is that Scala doesn't have a way to do that. The long answer is that you can do it, but it's an ugly hack. The hack is to use the fact that exception stack traces include the name of the static class definition where the stack trace was created. Parse and tada. But, seriously, don't do this. Or, if you do, move it to a mixin trait and modify the parsing bit to pull the class name from the appropriate spot in the trace. Also, I've only tested this in some fairly limited conditions: no guarantee that it will work everywhere.

class MyClass {
  private val log = Logger get (Class forName (
    new RuntimeException().getStackTrace.apply(0).toString takeWhile 
        (_ != '(') split "\\." dropRight 1 mkString "."))
  def doit = log.info("doing")
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, it's a nice trick, but I'd prefer to do that at compile time, perhaps a compiler plugin. –  ithkuil Feb 26 '11 at 12:02

Surely you can just use the protected access modifier and access it directly?

class MyClass {
  protected val log = Logger.get(classOf[MyClass])
}

class SubClass extends MyClass {
}

new SubClass().doit
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to avoid to write the name of the class ("MyClass") twice. –  ithkuil Feb 24 '11 at 15:55

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