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To build on a post I saw here:

C# - Multiple generic types in one list

I want to bind a WPF DataGrid to the ClassAClassBCombinedList property something like:

<DataGrid ItemsSource="{Binding ClassAClassBCombinedList.Data}" />

for the property:

public List<CombinedClass> ClassAClassBCombinedList
{
    get
    {
        List<CombinedClass> result = new List<CombinedClass>();
        result.Add(new CombinedClass<ClassA>(new ClassA()));
        result.Add(new CombinedClass<ClassB>(new ClassB()));
        return result;
    }
}

With CombinedClass defined as:

public interface CombinedClass { }

public class CombinedClass<T> : CombinedClass where T : class
{
    public CombinedClass(T classInstance)
    {
        Data = classInstance;
    }            
    public T Data { get; private set; }
}

But this doesn't work because:
'CombinedClass' does not contain a definition for 'Data' and no extension method 'Data' accepting a first argument of type 'CombinedClass'

You can access the Data member by casting, however this defeats the point.

((CombinedClass<ClassA>)ClassAClassBCombinedList.First()).Data;

Any ideas on how to combine a list with multiple class types and bind to them in WPF??

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3 Answers 3

You may be overthinking this.

Why don't you just create a List<object> and populate it with whatever objects you need to display in your UI? Then do something like:

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyList}">
   <ListBox.ItemTemplate>
      <DataTemplate>
         <TextBlock Text="{Binding Data}"/>
      </DataTemplate>
   </ListBox.Template>
</ListBox>

If ClassA and ClassB don't share common properties, you can do this:

<ListBox ItemsSource="{Binding MyList}">
   <ListBox.Resources>
      <DataTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:ClassA}">
         <!-- template for ClassA objects -->
      </DataTemplate>
      <DataTemplate TargetType="{x:Type local:ClassB}">
         <!-- template for ClassB objects -->
      </DataTemplate>
   </ListBox.Resources>
</ListBox>
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Why don't you make your ClassA and ClassB use the same interface IClass which defines the Data property? Then you can make a List<IClass> which can contain ClassA as well as ClassB and which you can bind to your DataGrid.

public interface IClass
{
 object Data {get; set; }
}

public class ClassA : IClass
{
 // implement `Data` property
}

public class ClassB : IClass
{
 // implement `Data` property
}


{
 // make the list by adding objects of type `ClassA` or `ClassB`, don't forget to set their `Data` property
 List<IClass> result = new List<IClass>();
 result.Add(new ClassA());
 result.Add(new ClassB());
}

And Bind it

dataGrid.ItemsSource = result // List<IClass>
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This would work well, but ClassA and ClassB are already derived from different base classes, and I don't have access to change them. –  SDK Feb 24 '11 at 13:47
1  
Are they partial classes? if so you can make another partial with the same name that uses the interface: public partial class ClassA : IClass {}. After compilation the ClassA that you cannot change still uses the interface and my approach would work without editing the existing ClassA. –  Bazzz Feb 24 '11 at 13:49
    
Unfortunately they're not. –  SDK Feb 24 '11 at 13:54
1  
I'm sensing a design pattern here, but my brain doesn't allow the name of it to come up at the moment. The "two objects that you cannot change and of different types but have similarities anyway" design pattern. eerrr.... Bridge? –  Bazzz Feb 24 '11 at 14:00
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Your problem is not the cast. The problem is, that ClassAClassBCombinedList returns a List, whereas the property Data is a property of each instance in the list!

Additionally, your interface CombinedClass is useless, because it doesn't provide anything. You should put something like object Data in it and overwrite the property in CombinedClass<T> with the new keyword.

In general, I am not sure, this is a good idea to do, even though it is the accepted answer in the linked question.

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Sorry my link was wrong, I've updated it. The reason I use the empty CombinedClass interface (which could just as easily be an abstract class). Is so that I can create a List of CombinedClass without specifying the class type. Doing what I'm trying to do here would be easy if both classes were derived from a base class, but they're not. –  SDK Feb 24 '11 at 13:35
    
What do you mean they're not derived from a base class. According to your question they are... they derive from CombinedClass. Is that incorrect? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 24 '11 at 13:37
    
@SDK: Your problem is, that you are trying to bind ClassAClassBCombinedList.Data to the ItemsSource where you should only bind ClassAClassBCombinedList. In the DataTemplate inside your ListView you can access your property Data. –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 24 '11 at 13:38
    
I take your point: - I'm now trying with setting DisplayMemberPath="Data" - However it's not working very well with the DataGrid as ClassA for eg contains multiple columns (Properties) –  SDK Feb 24 '11 at 13:45
    
Yes, you first need to know, what data you want to show ;-) –  Daniel Hilgarth Feb 24 '11 at 13:48
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