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I need to make an application compatible with the all NET Framework: 2, 3, 3.5 and 4.

In addition I want to develop an application that when performed with a PC that has only installed Framework 2 the GUI is made with Windows Forms, but if the PC is using the Framework 3, or later, the GUI is done with WPF.


I have developed an application with NET 2 and Windows Forms. I tested this application with NET 3, 4 and 3.5 and it works correctly.

I recently updated the GUI with WPF, these changes were simple, because I developed the interface with the databinding paradigm. This choice has allowed me to switch from Windows Forms to WPF easily.


I overcame the problem of creating a single application (for Windows Forms) to be performed with any framework using this guide: http://msdn.microsoft.com/it-it/library/w671swch%28v=VS.100%29.aspx.

Now I wanted to make sure that if the PC was the NET 3.5 or higher installed the application using the GUI made with WPF.

I tried to follow some guidelines, such as: http://msdn.microsoft.com/it-it/library/433ysdt1.aspx, but unsuccessfully. I am very confused about how to proceed.


The application should not install anything on the PC, just use what is there.

Thanks in advance, Talao.

share|improve this question
    
Ouch. These are quite onerous requirements... – Paddy Feb 24 '11 at 14:23
    
Given your updates, it might be worth posting some of what you've tried and what your specific problem is. Your original question was very generic; now it seems quite specific but lacks the detail we'd need to provide an answer. – Dan Puzey Feb 24 '11 at 23:58
    
Given the updates, I have to agree. Build it as a .net 2.0 or greater application. And build a separate application as .net 4.0 or greater. The development required to support both in a single application probably isn't worth it. Whilst it is doable using MVC/MVP i agree WinForms and WPF are different, and as such the views will end up containing code that should be tested. – JonWillis Feb 27 '11 at 17:47

If your application needs to be compatible with all of those versions then what you're really saying is: it needs to be a .NET 2 application. A .NET 3 (or higher) application simply won't work otherwise, because it won't find the assemblies it needs at startup.

That said, since .NET 3 is built on .NET 2, I'm sure you could find a way to dynamically load the .NET 3 assemblies if the framework is available. This isn't going to be pretty, though.

Even if you manage this, however, the fundamentals of an application are very different under WinForms and WPF, so you'll find you're rewriting a lot of code. Simply replacing the View of an MVC application isn't likely to be enough (unless you're willing to write some really complicated views...).

My suggestion would be either to write two applications or - for preference - write it in .NET 4 and include the framework as part of your installer. Assuming this is a commercial application then it's either that or just stick with WinForms - I can't imagine the development overhead is likely to be worthwhile.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately the application should not install anything on the PC, just use what is there. – McTALAO Feb 24 '11 at 15:17

The simplest solution I can think of is to develop the GUI using MVC/MVP pattern. Where the view is either a Winform form or a WPF form. You then developed each view as a WinForm Form and as a WPF form.

At startup of the application, call Environment.Version to get the framework version. Based on this version you can tell the application to load with WPF or Winform views. If greater than or equal to the 3.5 framework, use WPF, else use WinForm views.

The other approach is using compatible controls, where you can put WinForms inside WPF controls, however you lose the power of WPF by doing so, so this is only good to bring in a few WinForm controls to a mostly WPF application.

share|improve this answer
    
Although, I honestly see no benefit to doing this unless you are using WPF to take advantage of the WPF features like the graphically beauty you can create. One benefit is data binding with MVVM which you won't have with MVC/MVP patterns. It also means double the workload in terms of creating views, as atleast the business logic is seperate and it should be a drag/drop exercises for designing the views. – JonWillis Feb 24 '11 at 14:28
    
I would note that it also means that you can't use any language features in your business logic that don't exist in .net 2.0... – Paddy Feb 24 '11 at 14:31
    
Very true! If you want to support more .net framework versions, your limited by the lowest version number. Unless you make special cases like the view where you write code for each version. – JonWillis Feb 24 '11 at 14:40
    
I have developed an application with NET 2 and Windows Forms I tested this application with NET 3, 4 and 3.5 and it works correctly. – McTALAO Feb 24 '11 at 15:10
    
I recently updated the GUI with WPF, these changes were simple, because I developed the interface with the databinding paradigm. This choice has allowed me to switch from Windows Forms to WPF easily. – McTALAO Feb 24 '11 at 15:10

Did you consider creating multiple applications, one for each user interface? If you have business logic and user interface separated, than this should not be much of a problem.

Then installer analyzes target system and determines which executable, Winforms or WPF, is going to be installed.

share|improve this answer
    
Ideally the application should be ready to move to WPF. After installing the application the user can decide to install the Framework 3.5 or higher, in this case the application should go to the GUI made with WPF. – McTALAO Feb 24 '11 at 15:53

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