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I have a jquery class within a normal class in javascript. Is it possible to access variables in the scope of the parent class from a callback function in the jquery class?

A simple example of what I mean is shown below

var simpleClass = function () {    
    this.status = "pending";
    this.target = jqueryObject;
    this.updateStatus = function() {
        this.target.fadeOut("fast",function () {
           this.status = "complete"; //this needs to update the parent class 
        });
    };
};

Now in the above example, the callback function tries to access the scope of the jquery object. is there any way to access the status variable in the parent class?

share|improve this question
    
by class u mean method or function right ? –  Val Feb 24 '11 at 14:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You set "this" to a variable in the parent function and then use it in the inner function.

var simpleClass = function () {         
    this.status = "pending";     
    this.target = jqueryObject;     

    var parent = this;

    this.updateStatus = function() {         
            this.jqueryObject.fadeOut("fast",function () {            
                parent.status = "complete"; //this needs to update the parent class          
            });     
        }; 
    }; 
share|improve this answer
    
That wont work parent is in the scope of simpleClass not of the jquery object What you have to remeber is jQuery call back code is called as its own function noting to do with where it was set –  Barkermn01 Feb 24 '11 at 15:05
    
This worked a treat, thanks for the help –  Sam Feb 24 '11 at 15:07
2  
@Barkermn01 the variable is accessible by the powers of closures! developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Guide/Closures –  Humberto Feb 24 '11 at 15:08
    
Bull the scopes, jQuery callbacks are not called in the scope of the class that defined them –  Barkermn01 Feb 24 '11 at 15:10
    
i know this with all call back system coz i have to add a var to the XMLHttpRequest to have another objects access inside the XMLHttpRequest i use varName.API = this; then in the callback i get the srcElement from the provided object so it's not in the global scope but still accessible –  Barkermn01 Feb 24 '11 at 15:16

Sorry m8. You have to nest the reference down into the objects like so:

var simpleClass = function () {
    var _root = this;
    this.status = "pending";
    this.target = jqueryObject;
    this.updateStatus = function() {
        this.root = _root;
        _root.target.fadeOut("fast",function () {
           this.status = "complete"; //this needs to update the parent class 
        });
    };
};

notice the var _root

share|improve this answer
    
ok i se now that i could have used this.root.target instead of _root.target but its the same, so it doesn't matter :) –  Tokimon Feb 24 '11 at 15:03

You can mantain state using closure variables:

function simpleClass() {
   var _state = { status: "pending", target: jqueryObject; }

   this.updateStatus = function() {
      this.target.fadeOut("fast",function () {
         _state.status = "complete"; //this needs to update the parent class 
      });
   }
}

// Later...
var classInstance = new simpleClass();
share|improve this answer

try this:

   var sc = (function(scc){

    scc = {};

    scc.target = jQueryObject;


    scc.stt = "stt init";

    scc.updateStatus = function(){
        var elem = this;

        this.target.click(function(){
            elem.stt= "stt change";
            console.log(elem.stt);
        })

    }

    return scc;


}(sc || {}));

you can also define your target object as private variable

share|improve this answer

your confusing me with your question not sure what your wanting

But a common exploit in all program languages are to pas your object(class) into the new one

E.G

function test(){
  alert = function(){
     alert("hello");
  }

  obj = function(localTest){
    localTest.alert();
  }
}

var handle = new test();
handle.obj(handle);

Then there is the global scope now if some one downs me for this i wont be happy alot of programmers dont like this but it works

function test(){
  alert = function(){
     alert("hello");
  }

  obj = function(){
    window.testObj.alert();
  }

  window.testObj = this;
}

var handle = new test();
handle.obj();
share|improve this answer
    
In both of these examples, 'test' is not meaningful as a constructor -- or anything else, for that matter. Calling new test() would yield an empty object. All it does on execution is define global variables: 'alert', 'obj', and (in the second example) 'testObj', which then go unused. If you run this code, you will find that 'handle' actually has no method named 'obj'; you would have had to use 'this.obj =' instead of 'obj ='. Even so I'm not even sure what you intended the above code to do. –  Semicolon Feb 5 at 23:44

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