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The program I am developing gets three times slower when I call the following function. It wouldn't be bad if it was not called a couple million of times.

double obterNormLarguraBanda(const std::vector<double>& v, int periodos)
{
    int aa; 
    double maximo, minimo, valor;
    std::vector<double>::const_iterator inicio;
    if (v.size() < periodos)
    {   
        inicio = v.begin();
    }   
    else
    {   
        inicio = v.end() - periodos;
    }   
    maximo = *max_element(inicio, v.end(), excludeWrong);
    minimo = *min_element(inicio, v.end(), excludeWrong);
    return (v.back()-minimo)/(maximo - minimo);
}

bool excludeWrong(double i, double j)
{
    if (i==-1 || j==-1) return false;
    return i<j;
}

periodos takes the value 500. Is there another way to speed up significantly this function?

Luis

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2  
Are you compiling in debug mode? Perhaps it's use a safe stl style implementation and the calls are being bound checked each time. Try turning optimizations on. –  Jeff Foster Feb 24 '11 at 15:05
3  
You'll probably be better off without min_element and max_element, and doing a single iteration to find both. –  Mike Seymour Feb 24 '11 at 15:10
4  
Btw comparing double against -1 for strict equality is not a very good idea. –  sharptooth Feb 24 '11 at 15:18
    
@Jeff Foster: Even worse, in MSVC 2005/2008 it is enabled by default in Release mode as well, one has to use the _SCL_SECURE macro to disable that. –  7vies Feb 24 '11 at 15:25
3  
@sharptooth: Why? -1 is exact in all common floating-point representations. Comparing any floating-point result for equality is a bad idea, but this looks like magic number, not a computation. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 15:33
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

EDIT: didn't notice your use of a predicate (the spanish threw me off a bit!) Let me rewrite for a few minutes...

max_element and min_element are both iterating through the range, when the entire step could be done in one function.

I believe some compilers have a minmax_element function in their STL, but I do not believe it is in the standard. You could write your own. I originally wrote this as an untemplated version, but if you have a good compiler it should make no difference.

Try something like this (untested)

template <typename Iter, typename Pred>
void minmax_element(Iter begin, Iter end, Iter& min, Iter& max, const Pred& comp)
{
    min = begin;
    max = begin;

    typedef std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type T;
    for (++begin; begin != end; ++begin)
    {
        if (comp(*max, *begin))
            max = begin;
        else if (comp(*begin, *min))
            min = begin;
    }
}

template <typename Iter>
void minmax_element(Iter begin, Iter end, Iter& min, Iter& max)
{
    minmax_element(begin, end, min, max, std::less<std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type>());
}
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2  
std::minmax_element is in the 3225 draft of C++0x, so it's going to be standard. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 15:37
    
@Ben Voigt: It's Portuguese, not Spanish! Thank you for the answer. I'll implement it, although I'm not at ease with templates, yet. –  Luis Feb 24 '11 at 16:27
    
Give credit where credit is due. It's rlbond's excellent answer, and unfortunate misrecognition of language. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 16:41
    
You're correct Ben Voigt. The previous comment was for rlbond! My apologies. –  Luis Feb 24 '11 at 17:19
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Contrary to what others say, I don't believe replacing the two calls to std::max_element() and std::min_element() with a single minmax_element() would improve performance in a significant manner, because iterating 2*n times with 1 operation or iterating n times with 2 operations makes little to no difference.

What would make a difference however is to eliminate the two calls altogether from your algorithm. That is, find the minimum and maximum elements and then check against those when new data comes in, rather than comparing new data against the entire container again.

 double obterNormLarguraBanda(const std::vector<double>& v,
                              double maximo, double minimo)
{
    return (v.back()-minimo)/(maximo - minimo);
}

bool excludeWrong(double i, double j)
{
    if (i==-1 || j==-1) return false;
    return i<j;
}

// usage example
void f()
{
    std::vector<double> v;
    // ...
    double maximo = *max_element(inicio, v.end(), excludeWrong);
    double minimo = *min_element(inicio, v.end(), excludeWrong);
    for( int i = 0; i != 1000; ++i ) {
        // if( ! excludeWrong(new_datum, maximo) ) maximo = new_datum;
        // if( excludeWrong(new_datum, minimo) ) minimo = new_datum;
        double d = obterNormLarguraBanda(...);
    }
}
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This is a good point -- sometimes. We don't have enough information, just that this function is called a lot. If he's just taking a stream of data, there is no way to speed up the algorithm. +1 –  rlbond Feb 24 '11 at 15:34
    
Who said Luis is passing the same vector many times? He just said the function gets used many times. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 15:35
    
Anyway, iterating twice over any large collection is much MUCH more expensive than doing all the work in one pass, because of cache misses. However, 500 elements is not a large container. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 15:39
    
@BenVoigt that doesn't matter. I'll update my answer to be more clear about it. –  wilhelmtell Feb 24 '11 at 15:39
    
@BenVoigt you're still talking about performance improvement in a constant factor, whereas I am suggesting performance improvement in an order of magnitude! –  wilhelmtell Feb 24 '11 at 15:42
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You could replace those two calls with a single std::minmax_element().

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Note: This may require a new compiler with C++0x libraries. –  Ben Voigt Feb 24 '11 at 15:36
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"3 times slower" with respect to what - to another implementation, or to just not calling this function? In the second case it is possible that it is just algorithmic complexity that makes it slower.

You didn't explain how your code is used exactly, in some cases you could cache the calculation of the min/max instead of doing that in a loop. For example, if the input vector is rarely changed, it doesn't make sense to recalculate that every time. And even when it changes, you can update min/max without going over periodos elements (dynamic programming might help).

You could also check the generated assembly to check for strange function calls (eg iterators secure checks), I know that at least MSVC 2005/2008 has them enabled by default even in Release mode (see the _SCL_SECURE macro).

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I should have been clearer, sorry. It was 3 times as slower as without this function being called. The input vector has to be changed everytime the function is called. And I'm using g++. –  Luis Feb 24 '11 at 16:25
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This isn't an answer to the specific question about performance, so maybe it has no value. But it seems that the excludeWrong compare function would cause unexpected or possibly implementation-dependent results. If the first value compared is -1, then it may be computed as both the min and the max for all cases. I tested with both gcc v4.0.2 and Microsoft's compiler v15.00.21022.08. For example, the following:

   std::vector<double> v;
   v.push_back( -1 );
   v.push_back( 1 );
   v.push_back( 2 );
   cout << "min: " << *min_element( v.begin(), v.end(), excludeWrong ) << endl;
   cout << "max: " << *max_element( v.begin(), v.end(), excludeWrong ) << endl;

prints:

min: -1
max: -1

Maybe that is the desired result, but it seems a bit odd.

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Thanks for pointing this out, even if it is not directly related to the question. excludeWrong() is given as comparison function, which is expected to return "true if the first argument is to be considered less than the second argument, and false otherwise". Returning false is therefore not a way to filter out a value - it messes up the comparison instead... –  OK. Aug 17 '11 at 9:34
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