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I have an integer column that holds a Unix epoch time value. I want to calculate if it falls within today.

For example, let today be the 24th day in the month. The query should return rows that fall on the 24th, but not ones that fall on the 23rd or some time before that.

Thanks for looking.

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use the Julian day for this, as it could be "rounded" to the day boundary. See http://www.sqlite.org/lang_datefunc.html

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I'm not sure what to do with the Julian date. I'm very confused by its definition: "the number of days since noon in Greenwich on November 24, 4714 B.C." – Louis Feb 24 '11 at 15:38
1  
Alright, the Julian Day is meant to have the integer part denote the number of days (which makes calculating time/date differences incredibly easy) and the fractional part the hours, minutes, seconds on that day. So if you retrieve the integer part of "today" as Julian Day and do the same for the epoch time you already have, it's very easy to figure out whether it is the same day, i.e. today ;) – 0xC0000022L Feb 24 '11 at 15:46
    
Ahh, okay...that makes sense! – Louis Feb 24 '11 at 15:57
    
If this returns 0 then the epoch value falls on today's date: SELECT (ROUND(strftime('%J', 'SOME_EPOCH_VALUE') - 0.5) - ROUND(julianday('now') - 0.5) – Louis Feb 24 '11 at 16:06
    
The Julian Day starts at noon instead of midnight (which was more useful to astronomers). If you want a midnight-based date, you have to add or subtract 0.5. – dan04 Feb 25 '11 at 22:55

Use DATE(TheColumn, 'unixepoch') to get the date.

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With MySQL Try:

SELECT *
FROM yourTable
WHERE DATE(FROM_UNIXTIME(yourUnixEpochField)) = DATE(NOW());
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1  
Too bad this question is about SQLite... (although even if it were a MySQL question, I still wouldn't upvote this answer because that query is not indexable). – user212218 Jan 20 '12 at 16:28

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