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I have to create a console application which needs certain parameters. If they are missing or wrong I print out an error message.

Now the problem: If someone starts the program from the explorer by double-clicking the console window disappears immediately. (But the application is not entirely useless from the explorer, you could drag files onto it and it would work)

I could always wait for a keypress, but I don't want that if the user did start it from the command line.

Is there some way to distinguish between these situations?

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+1! Was just about to create ask a similar Q. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 21 '13 at 10:11
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4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/99115, "INFO: Preventing the Console Window from Disappearing".

The idea is to use GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo to determine that the cursor has not moved from the initial 0,0 position.

Code sample from @tomlogic, based on the referenced Knowledge Base article:

// call in main() before printing to stdout
// returns TRUE if program is in its own console (cursor at 0,0) or
// FALSE if it was launched from an existing console.
// See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/99115
#include <stdio.h>
#include <windows.h>
int separate_console( void)
{
    CONSOLE_SCREEN_BUFFER_INFO csbi;

    if (!GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo( GetStdHandle( STD_OUTPUT_HANDLE), &csbi))
    {
        printf( "GetConsoleScreenBufferInfo failed: %lu\n", GetLastError());
        return FALSE;
    }

    // if cursor position is (0,0) then we were launched in a separate console
    return ((!csbi.dwCursorPosition.X) && (!csbi.dwCursorPosition.Y));
}
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This quite original :) Although this is a hack it does exactly what I need and it's far more simple then getting the PPID. –  Daniel Rikowski Feb 5 '09 at 7:07
    
you should only use this hack when there are no arguments passed to the app so you can still do "cls&app filename" from cmd.exe –  Anders Feb 16 '09 at 2:31
    
Just implemented this solution, and it works great for a MinGW/MSYS-compiled command-line app. And, @Anders, cls && appname.exe works just fine. I'm going to edit this answer to include the code I'm using, for others to reference. –  tomlogic Mar 22 '12 at 19:44
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I believe cmd.exe sets the CMDCMDLINE and CMDEXTVERSION environemntal variables when it starts. So if these are set your program was most probably started from a shell.

This isn't foolproof but it's something.

It's also possible to determine your parent PID in a few convoluted and possibly unreliable ways, or so I gather. You may want to look into that.

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I tried the environment variables, and they don’t exist, neither when run from cmd.exe nor when run outside it. However, typing echo %cmdcmdline% does produce something, so the variable is apparently only valid in cmd.exe itself, not its child processes. –  Timwi Aug 20 '10 at 2:10
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GetConsoleTitle()

I've seen code which performs

if (!GetConsoleTitle(NULL, 0) && GetLastError() == ERROR_SUCCESS) {
    // Console
} else {
    // GUI
}

BUT... I've found that AttachConsole() is more helpful

In C++ (off the top of my head, and I'm no C++ programmer)

if (!AttachConsole(ATTACH_PARENT_PROCESS)) {
    // GUI
} else {
    // Console, and you have a handle to the console that already exists.
}

Is more effective. Additionally, if you find yourself in a GUI environment and would like to stay there as long as you can, but later find something catastrophic has happened that could really use a dump to a console window (you can't be arsed writing an edit box window to lot it to or attach to the NT System log and throw up a MessageBox()) well then you can AllocConsole() later on in the process, when GUI methods have failed.

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Some feedback: I'm looking to do this in a command-line app compiled with MinGW/MSYS. Neither method worked for me -- I could not differentiate between dragging a file onto the app in Windows Explorer, and executing it on the command-line inside a bash shell. –  tomlogic Mar 22 '12 at 19:25
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How about waiting for a keystroke when you display the error message, and not other times?

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