Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#define TRIP 6
#include <stdio.h>

char error_area(char area_code, char S, char M, char L, char N, char P, char K, char R, char C, char U, char W, char O, char T, char F);

int main(void)
{
  char area_code, S, M, L, N, P, K, R, C, U, W, O, T, F, checkB, travelarea[TRIP];

  printf("Please select from the following that best describes your destination:\n");   /*area code input*/
  printf("S Small city - population under 50,000\n");                                   /*Choices for area code*/ 
  printf("M Medium city - population between 50,000 and 500,000\n");
  printf("L Large city - pop. over 500,000\n");
  printf("N Natural formation like a mountain, a lake, a cave, a geyser, a fjord, a canyon, etc.\n");
  printf("P Designated park or reserve such as a wildlife refuge, a national park, a bioreserve, or a protected marine area\n");
  printf("K Man made landmark like the Great Wall of China, the Taj Mahal, or Stonehenge\n");
  printf("R State or province or region of a country\n");
  printf("C Whole country\n");
  printf("U Multiple countries like traveling through Europe\n");
  printf("W Ocean voyage\n");
  printf("O Any other type of destination - such as visiting the sites of the seven wonders of the world\n");
  printf("Please enter the Area Letter code:");
  scanf("%c", &area_code);   

  checkB = error_area(area_code, S, M, L, N, P, K, R, C, U, W, O, T, F);
  while (checkB == F)                              /*error loop for error area code*/
    {
      printf("Please re-enter a valid area_code:");
      scanf("%c", &area_code);
      checkB = error_area(area_code, S, M, L, N, P, K, R, C, U, W, O, T, F);
      if (checkB == T)
    {travelarea[0]=area_code;}
    } 

}    

error_area(area_code, S, M, L, N, P, K, R, C, U, W, O, T, F)   /*area code error check*/
{

  if ( (area_code == S) || (area_code == M) || (area_code == L) ||(area_code == N) ||(area_code == P) ||(area_code == K) || (area_code == R) ||(area_code == C) || (area_code == U) || (area_code == W) || (area_code == O))
    {
      return T;
    }
  else
    {
      printf("Area code is invalid. (Please make sure code is capitalize)\n");

      return F ;
    }
}

I get this error:

test2.c:40: error: conflicting types for âerror_areaâ
test2.c:5: error: previous declaration of âerror_areaâ was here

I keep getting these error messages when I compile and I'm sure I declared the prototype and its type at the beginning so I'm not sure why there a conflict in types. One of my tutors told me that it was because it was declared and to define all the types at the bottom where I called error_area but that didn't seem to work.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just because you declared the prototype for error_area function does not mean that you are now free to omit return type and parameter types in the definition. When you define your error_area you are still supposed to specify all types explicitly

char error_area(char area_code, char S, char M, char L, char N, char P, char K, char R, char C, char U, char W, char O, char T, char F)
{
  ...

Instead, you defined your error_area without the explicit type names. The definition was interpreted in accordance with the "old" rules, i.e. all missing types were assumed to be int, so what you defined is equivalent to

int error_area(int area_code, int S, ... /* and so on */
{
  ...

This is totally different from what you said in the prototype. So the compiler is telling you that your declaration contradicts your definition.

share|improve this answer
    
so does that mean for other type of functions besides int I would need to still define the types when I call the function –  Thao Nguyen Feb 24 '11 at 17:57
    
@Thao Nguyen: "Call"? This has nothing to do with any "calls". You declare the function (the prototype) and you define the function (the actual body). In both cases all types have to be explicitly specified. Moreover, int also has to be explicitly specified. Only the outdated versions of C language allowed to omit int. Not anymore. –  AnT Feb 24 '11 at 18:02
    
@AndreyT: And you'll see those outdated versions in practice as long as people still value backward compatibility. Sometimes bad decisions, or at least regrettable ones, linger a long, long time. –  David Thornley Feb 24 '11 at 18:08
    
@David Thornley: Nobody's arguing with that. However, mixing prototypes with K&R-style definitions (as well as mixing non-prototype declarations with prototyped definitions) requires a bit of skill. –  AnT Feb 24 '11 at 18:10
    
ah okay I see ..I guess my professor teaching us with a old version of C great. thanks for the help –  Thao Nguyen Feb 24 '11 at 18:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.