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I worked somewhere before where they had an xll that allowed one to track the amount of memory being used in Excel. Also when calls were made to other dlls and xlls these were logged. This was all spewed out to a logfile based on the Excel PID. There was then a solution that could be used to read the log into a format that could be used in a Pivot Table.

I have googled for nearly an hour coming at it from all angles in search terms, but I am just not having any luck. I cannot remember the provider but I am pretty sure it wasn't in house.

Hope people can help.

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It was called the Excel Profiler as I remember. All google links go to warez stuff sadly. I'll keep looking –  FinancialRadDeveloper Feb 25 '11 at 9:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No responses. Oh well.

In the end I managed to find the answer. It is a utility called Performance Monitor. It is talked about here :

http://www.dailydoseofexcel.com/archives/2007/09/18/performance-monitor/

It is from the book Professional Excel Development :

Professional Excel Development: The Definitive Guide to Developing Applications Using Microsoft Excel, VBA, and .NET: The Definitive Guide to ... and VBA (Addison-Wesley Microsoft Technology)

I hope this helps future people searching for this.

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legend great find, did you find this useful for troubleshooting your client performance issues in Excel? –  Anonymous Type Sep 8 '11 at 1:06
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Yes. At one of my clients they extended it so it was great to see where the memory was peaking and then trying to bundle inermediate calcs in cells together to reduce heap memory and making sure it could be returned properly. Also helped with speed. –  FinancialRadDeveloper Sep 19 '11 at 17:22
    
increasing the performance of workbooks that are regularly used sounds like an awesome idea. Targetting of blackbox calculations to figure out what formulas are trashing memory is l337. –  Anonymous Type Sep 20 '11 at 1:26

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