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In Delphi, I have a Connect 4 board representation (7 columns x 6 lines) in form of an array:

TBoard = Array[1..7, 1..6] of SmallInt;
Board: TBoard; // instance ob TBoard

Each element can have three different states:

  • 1 = player 1's pieces
  • 0 = empty
  • -1 = player 2's pieces

Now I need a function which checks if there's a winner or a draw:

function CheckForWinner(): SmallInt;

... where 1 is player 1's win, 0 is a draw, -1 is player 2's win and "nil" is for a game which has not ended yet.

My draft is as follows - split into two single functions:

function CheckForWinner(): SmallInt;
var playerToCheck: ShortInt;
    s, z: Byte;
    draw: Boolean;
begin
  draw := TRUE;
  for s := 1 to 7 do begin
    for z := 1 to 6 do begin
      if Board[s, z] = 0 then draw := FALSE; // if there are empty fields then it is no draw
    end;
  end;
  if draw then begin
    result := 0;
  end
  else begin
    playerToCheck := Board[lastPieceX, lastPieceY]; // only for last-moving player
    if searchRow(playerToCheck, +1, 0, lastPieceX, lastPieceY) then // search right/left
      result := playerToCheck
    else if searchRow(playerToCheck, 0, +1, lastPieceX, lastPieceY) then // search up/down
      result := playerToCheck
    else if searchRow(playerToCheck, +1, +1, lastPieceX, lastPieceY) then // search right-down/left-up
      result := playerToCheck
    else if searchRow(playerToCheck, +1, -1, lastPieceX, lastPieceY) then // search right-up/left-down
      result := playerToCheck;
    else
      result := nil;
    end;
  end;
end;

function searchRow(player: SmallInt; sChange, zChange: ShortInt; startS, startZ: Byte): Boolean;
var inRow, s, z: SmallInt;
begin
  inRow := 0;
  s := startS;
  z := startZ;
  while (Board[s, z] = player) AND (inRow < 4) AND (s >= 1) AND (s <= 7) AND (z >= 1) AND (z <= 6) do begin
    s := s+sChange;
    z := z+zChange;
    inRow := inRow+1;
  end;
  s := startS-sChange;
  z := startZ-zChange;
  while (Board[s, z] = player) AND (inRow < 4) AND (s >= 1) AND (s <= 7) AND (z >= 1) AND (z <= 6) do begin
    s := s-sChange;
    z := z-zChange;
    inRow := inRow+1;
  end;
  if inRow = 4 then
    result := TRUE
  else
    result := FALSE;
end;

What do you think of this approach? Do you have a better (faster / shorter) solution?

Thank you very much!

share|improve this question
2  
I suspect the rules to this games are very simple. You should have saved us the Google search by providing the rules in the question. I for want don't feel like googleing the rules, only to find out you're actually playing by a different set of rules. –  Cosmin Prund Feb 24 '11 at 18:03
2  
A SmallInt cannot be nil –  GolezTrol Feb 24 '11 at 18:11
3  
And you only need to check from the point where the last piece is dropped. –  GolezTrol Feb 24 '11 at 18:13
    
@GolezTrol: I've already implemented this as you can see ;) –  Marco W. Feb 24 '11 at 18:39
    
@Cosmin Prund: I was assuming everyone knows the rules as it is a very famous game, sorry. And I do play by the same set of rules as it is usual?! –  Marco W. Feb 24 '11 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Checking for a winner in very much the same way as you do, only with a little less code. I think you wouldn't need to check all fields to determine if the game is done. Just increase a counter when you drop a piece in the game. The game is a draw if the counter reaches 42 and there is no winner yet.

function CheckRow(x, y, xd, yd: Integer): Boolean;
var
  c: Integer;

  function RowLength(x, y, xd, yd: Integer): Integer;
  begin
    Result := 0;
    repeat
      Inc(Result);
      Inc(x, xd);
      Inc(y, yd);
    until not ((x in [1..7]) and (y in [1..6]) and (Board[x, y] = c));
  end;

begin
  c := Board[x, y];

  Result := 4 <= RowLength(x, y, xd, yd) + RowLength(x, y, xd*-1, yd*-1) - 1;
end;

function CheckForWinner(x, y: Integer): Integer;
begin
  Result := 0;
  if CheckRow(x, y, 0, 1) or CheckRow(x, y, 1, 1) or
     CheckRow(x, y, 1, 0) or CheckRow(x, y, 1, -1) then
    Result := Board[x,y];
end;
share|improve this answer
    
This has a bug. I'll give you your up-vote back if you can find and fix it!! –  David Heffernan Feb 25 '11 at 11:01
    
It has? I did some testing, though not very extensive. I can't imagine what it is, though. You can't break it by passing invalid x, y (although it probably won't return the the right value then). And it will even work with a variable number of players as long as neither of them has player nr 0. :) –  GolezTrol Feb 25 '11 at 13:22
    
Oops you're right. Checking from topleft to bottom right is wrong. 0, -1 should be 1, -1. :o –  GolezTrol Feb 25 '11 at 13:51
    
Well done. There's your upvote back! –  David Heffernan Feb 25 '11 at 14:46

I didn't read your code. I just elected to write some myself with a blank slate.

Here's my version:

const
  RowCount = 6;
  ColCount = 7;

type
  TState = (stNone, stA, stB);
  TBoard = array [1..RowCount] of array [1..ColCount] of TState;

function ValidLocation(Row, Col: Integer): Boolean;
begin
  Result := InRange(Row, 1, RowCount) and InRange(Col, 1, ColCount);
end;

procedure Check(
  const Board: TBoard;
  const StartRow, StartCol: Integer;
  const RowDelta, ColDelta: Integer;
  out Winner: TState
);
var
  Row, Col, Count: Integer;
  State: TState;
begin
  Winner := stNone;
  Row := StartRow;
  Col := StartCol;
  State := Board[Row, Col];
  if State=stNone then
    exit;
  Count := 0;
  while ValidLocation(Row, Col) and (Board[Row, Col]=State) do begin
    inc(Count);
    if Count=4 then begin
      Winner := State;
      exit;
    end;
    inc(Row, RowDelta);
    inc(Col, ColDelta);
  end;
end;

function Winner(const Board: TBoard): TState;
var
  Row, Col: Integer;
begin
  for Row := 1 to RowCount do begin
    for Col := 1 to ColCount do begin
      Check(Board, Row, Col, 0, 1, Result);//check row
      if Result<>stNone then
        exit;
      Check(Board, Row, Col, 1, 0, Result);//check column
      if Result<>stNone then 
        exit;
      Check(Board, Row, Col, 1, 1, Result);//check diagonal
      if Result<>stNone then 
        exit;
      Check(Board, Row, Col, 1, -1, Result);//check other diagonal
      if Result<>stNone then 
        exit;
    end;
  end;
  Result := stNone;
end;

Big long pile of code. Uses brute force approach, not that performance matters for Connect 4. Don't like the four identical if Result<>stNone then exit; lines, but you can surely think of a cleaner way. Code has not been run. It might not even work!! Just the way my brain attempted to solve the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
then begin exit; end? What's wrong with then exit;? Personally, I hate when people place begin on the same line as the thing before it, and also when you use begin and end where you don't need to. But Marjan has taught me not to complain about it too much! (And yes, I know the arguments supporting this style that I don't like.) Still +1 for some nice code. –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 24 '11 at 20:12
    
I just always do it that way, it's my Modula-2 heritage. Sorry! I seem to recall having some discussion with Deltics on this subject. –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '11 at 20:13
    
@David: now you can't put a breakpoint on that Exit statements. Nice algorithm though. –  Jeroen Wiert Pluimers Feb 24 '11 at 20:25
    
@Jeroen Thanks. Nice eh, but not nice enough for an up-vote!! ;-) Seriously don't waste it, I'm capped. Updated to make it breakpoint friendly. Not that you'd ever need to debug this code!! Ha ha. –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '11 at 20:28
    
Just updated to fix the bug! I was checking the same diagonal twice in the original code!! –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '11 at 21:19

Disclaimer: I haven't studied the algorithm in detail. The comments below are merely my first reactions after staring at the code for less than ten seconds.

I have some very quick remarks. First, I think

TCellState = (csUnoccupied, csPlayerA, csPlayerB)
TBoard = Array[1..7, 1..6] of TCellState;

is nicer. Of course, you can save compatibility with your old code by doing

TCellState = (csUnoccupied = 0, csPlayerA = 1, csPlayerB = -1)

Second,

draw := true;
for s := 1 to 7 do begin
  for z := 1 to 6 do begin
    if Board[s, z] = 0 then draw := false;
  end;
end;

You don't need the begin and end parts:

draw := TRUE;
for s := 1 to 7 do
  for z := 1 to 6 do
    if Board[s, z] = 0 then
      draw := false;

More importantly, as a gain in performance, you should break the loops as soon as you have set drawn to false:

draw := true;
for s := 1 to 7 do
  for z := 1 to 6 do
    if Board[s, z] = 0 then
    begin
      draw := false;
      break;
    end;

This will, however, only break the z loop. To break both loops, the nicest way is to put the entire block above in a local function. Let's call it CheckDraw:

function CheckDraw: boolean;
begin
  result := true;
  for s := 1 to 7 do
    for z := 1 to 6 do
      if Board[s, z] = 0 then
        Exit(false);
end;

Alternatively, you can use label and goto to break out of both loops at once.

Update

I see now that you can just do

for s := 1 to 7 do
  for z := 1 to 6 do
    if Board[s, z] = 0 then
      Exit(0);

and you don't even need to introduce the draw local variable!

End update

Furthermore,

if inRow = 4 then
   result := TRUE
 else
   result := FALSE;

is bad. You should do just

result := inRow = 4;

Finally, In my taste

s := s+sChange;

should be written

inc(s, sChange);

and

inRow := inRow+1

should be

inc(inRow);

Oh, and nil is a pointer, not an integer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 That said, I think performance is irrelevant here. The issue is correctness. Having made that point, I hope to goodness my answer is actually correct!!! –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '11 at 20:26
    
@David: No, performance isn't an issue. But what if the upper-left cell is unoccupied? It doesn't feel good to continue iterating when you have found the answer. Especially if you can skip the unnecessary iterations while making the code shorter at the same time! Optimization for free! –  Andreas Rejbrand Feb 24 '11 at 20:29
    
Well, as I said I didn't even read the original code anyway! –  David Heffernan Feb 24 '11 at 20:31

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