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I have a webservice which has a method that returns a List of Payment objects provided with some input parameters. However if the input parameters are not in the correct format, I would like to return an error message which is of type string, not a List of Payment objects. I would like do this using Generic Classes concept in C#. Anyone has any idea about how I can manage to do this ?

Many thanks,

Here is some code:

[WebMethod]
        public List<Payment> GetPayments(string firstDate, string lastDate, string entegrationStatus)
        {
            if (Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsValidEntegrationStatus(entegrationStatus))
            {
                return paymentManager.GetPayments(firstDate, lastDate, entegrationStatus);
            }
            else
            {
                return "ERROR MESSAGE";
            }
        }
share|improve this question
    
Are you set in stone on doing it this way ? (Because, you really ,really should not - use FaultReason/FaultContract exceptions, or even just return null and provide a GetLastErrorMessage() call) – nos Feb 24 '11 at 18:50

I'm fairly sure all you need to do is throw an exception in your service method. This will populate the Error property of the async event args that are returned back to the client. The client can check for errors in its 'async completed' event handler using this property and handle it accordingly.

This is probably a better design than just sending back a string as well because it separates a regular return message from an error return message.

It's as simple as:

Edit - Using the code you posted:

[WebMethod]
    public List<Payment> GetPayments(string firstDate, string lastDate, string entegrationStatus)
    {
        if (Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsValidEntegrationStatus(entegrationStatus))
        {
            return paymentManager.GetPayments(firstDate, lastDate, entegrationStatus);
        }
        else
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Your error message.");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
you could even do throw new Exception("Your string",caughtException); – jonezy Feb 24 '11 at 18:55
    
Exactly. This method allows you to send back your own error string and let the user know that the message is actually and error, and not just a regular return value. – Robin Feb 24 '11 at 18:58
2  
Throw ArgumentException, not System.Exception. – Mark Sowul Feb 24 '11 at 19:02
    
Absolutely! Exceptions, not strings, are for errors. It is also best to use specific exceptions like ArgumentException in this case, so the client code could handle different cases. – Dan Abramov Feb 24 '11 at 19:05
    
Do you mean this ? This is giving error. code[WebMethod] public List<Payment> GetPayments(string firstDate, string lastDate, string entegrationStatus) { if (Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsDateTime(firstDate) && Common.IsValidEntegrationStatus(entegrationStatus)) { return paymentManager.GetPayments(firstDate, lastDate, entegrationStatus); } else { throw new Exception("My error string"); } } – Nyce Feb 24 '11 at 19:10

If you REALLY want to do it, you can use a Tuple-like class (they introduced Tuples in C# 4.0). If you are using C# 2.0 then you can use KeyValuePair<List<YourObject>, string>. Be aware that I'm NOT suggesting you do it! You should throw an exception, or put the string message as an out parameter.

share|improve this answer

well you could do something simply like having an ErrorString property on your object, and if your main method fails, set the ErrorString and return null from your method

SomeObject o = new SomeOject();
ILIst<Things> things = o.GetThings();
if(things == null)
  Response.Write(o.ErrorString)
share|improve this answer
    
-1 for messing business logic with error messages. – Dan Abramov Feb 24 '11 at 19:07
    
so where would you store context sensitive error information? Or would you just rely on your users to understand how to decipher an exception or the details of that exception? Or do you just say "Something went wrong, sorry dude" – jonezy Feb 24 '11 at 19:39

A generic isn't really suitable for this use, because you cannot return a generic type based on a runtime condition within a generic method (since the method must be compiled with an exact type to run in the first place).

A common approach is to use an out parameter for your list and your string, and have your method return a bool denoting whether the list was returned. These methods are usually prefixed with Try.... eg

bool TryGetList<T>(out IList<T> lst, out string Error) {
    if (!somcondition) {
        Error = "err!";
        return false;
    }
    lst = ...
    return true;
}

The other technique is simply to use exceptions, but they can be more costly if you are likely to have errors frequently. An ArgumentException for example will let you specify which argument was invalid, and the caller can check the ParamName of the caught exception to decide what he should do afterwards.

share|improve this answer
    
-1. I want to kill the guy who wrote the huge codebase I'm currently working on because he never used exceptions, passed all errors as strings, and eventually ignored 80% of them. If error happens, throw an exception, don't pass strings around. – Dan Abramov Feb 24 '11 at 19:04
    
@gaearon I see exceptions ignored so frequently that I tend avoid using them wherever possible. (Only for unpredictable errors). The guy who wrote your code probably had similar experiences. C# is also lacking in compile time checking where exceptions are involved too, when compared to Java for instance. You end up relying wholly on documentation, which is rarely of high standard. – Mark H Feb 24 '11 at 19:23

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