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I need to create a background job that processes a table looking for rows matching on a particular id with different statuses. It will store the row data in a string to compare the data against a row with a matching id.

I know the syntax to get the row data but i have never tried comparing 2 rows from the same table before? How is it done? Would i need to use variables to store the data from each? Or some other way?

(Using SQL Server 2008)

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5 Answers 5

You can join a table to itself as many times as you require, it is called a self join.

An alias is assigned to each instance of the table (as in the example below) to differentiate one from another.

SELECT a.SelfJoinTableID
FROM   dbo.SelfJoinTable a
       INNER JOIN dbo.SelfJoinTable b
         ON a.SelfJoinTableID = b.SelfJoinTableID
       INNER JOIN dbo.SelfJoinTable c
         ON a.SelfJoinTableID = c.SelfJoinTableID
WHERE  a.Status = 'Status to filter a'
       AND b.Status = 'Status to filter b'
       AND c.Status = 'Status to filter c' 
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3  
Good for you for mentioning that you must alias –  HLGEM Feb 4 '09 at 14:35
8  
not really as many times as you require.. there is a limit of referencing 256 tables in query :] –  pkmiec Sep 28 '11 at 10:31

OK, after 2 years it's finally time to correct the syntax:

SELECT  t1.value, t2.value
FROM    MyTable t1
JOIN    MyTable t2
ON      t1.id = t2.id
WHERE   t1.id = @id
        AND t1.status = @status1
        AND t2.status = @status2
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2  
You should NOT use that syntax. Use specific joins instead. The left and right joins forms of that syntax are deprecated. I would not be surprised to find this form deprecated in the next version. –  HLGEM Feb 4 '09 at 14:34
    
@HLGEM - Can you provide links as to where this is mentioned as deprecated please? –  Pauk Nov 9 '10 at 10:54
2  
@Pauk ms-help://MS.SQLCC.v10/MS.SQLSVR.v10.en/s10sq_GetStart/html/c10eeaa5-3d3c-49b4-a‌​4bd-5dc4fb190142.htm And even if they weren;t deprecated the left and right versions should not be used as they give inconsistent and sometimes inaccurate results. They can sometimes be interpreted as a cross join instead of a left or right join. –  HLGEM Nov 9 '10 at 14:32
    
This link might be of more use than the ms-help guff: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd172122.aspx –  Pauk Nov 10 '10 at 13:43

Some people find the following alternative syntax easier to see what is going on:

select t1.value,t2.value
from MyTable t1
    inner join MyTable t2 on
        t1.id = t2.id
where t1.id = @id
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SELECT * FROM A AS b INNER JOIN A AS c ON b.a = c.a
WHERE b.a = 'some column value'
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SELECT COUNT(*) FROM (SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE id=1 UNION SELECT * FROM tbl WHERE id=2) a

If you got two rows, they different, if one - the same.

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