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I would like to know why this works:

class Foo {
    public function doSomethingFunny($subject) {
        preg_replace_callback(
            "#pattern#",
            array($this, 'doX'),
            $subject
        );
    }
    private function doX() {
        echo 'why does this work?';
    }
}

Why is the callback still within the context of $this? I would expect it the allow only public methods. I'm missing something fundamental in how the callback works.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The callback parameter in preg_replace_callback() allows for the calling of a method, and allows for the passing of an array to tell the method the context of the call back. It's not only $this, but also any object variable.

$foo = new Foo();
preg_replace_callback(
    "#pattern#",
    array($foo, 'bar'),
    $subject
);

In the example above, if Foo::bar() is private, that would not work. However, in your original case, the private method is still triggered because of the use of $this which is in the same context as the private method.

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if it's in the same class it's in the same scope/context ($this).

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i'm going out on a limb and saying yes (I don't have a solid place stating this for fact). But the point of the call back is to do some operation on the current context after an event, so logic would dictate that the context will be there in the context yes. –  jonezy Feb 24 '11 at 19:54

I believe it is implied that a callback executes in the current scope. call_user_func, or any function that uses a callback (such as preg_replace_callback) is intended to programatically emulate the equivalent in-line call. In other words, it must behave that way in order to provide the intended functionality.

Therefore in the following case Foo->A() and Foo->B() should behave the same way, regardless of visibility:

class Foo() {
    function Bar() {
    }

    function A() {
         return $this->Bar();
    }
    function B() {
         return call_user_func(array($this, 'Bar'));
    }
}

It isn’t explicitly documented though, which would be handy.

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