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My application uses Django's login view from django.contrib.auth.views.login, with a custom template I made.

I'd like to pass my template an additional argument which will change the login page in a few ways. Actually, I'm trying to show a different login page based on the URL.

How can I pass additional arguments to the login's view & to my custom template?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The source shows there is only one place that would influence the template context.

def login(request, template_name='registration/login.html',
          redirect_field_name=REDIRECT_FIELD_NAME,
          authentication_form=AuthenticationForm): # here

So your only option is to hitch a ride on AuthenticationForm or write your own login view (which, by the way, is very simple if you look at the code).

from django.contrib.auth.forms import AuthenticationForm

AuthenticationForm.my_extra_data = 'foobar'

(r'^accounts/login/$', 'django.contrib.auth.views.login', \ 
     {'template_name': 'myapp/login.html', \
      'authentication_form': AuthenticationForm }),

Template

{{ form.my_extra_data }}
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Thanks, I ended wrapping the whole login function with my own code. –  bjesus Mar 4 '11 at 20:40

On Django 1.3 the login view accepts a new extra_context argument in the form of a dictionary.

django/contrib/auth/views.py

def login(request, template_name='registration/login.html',
      redirect_field_name=REDIRECT_FIELD_NAME,
      authentication_form=AuthenticationForm,
      current_app=None, extra_context=None):
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Good to know, thanks. I'll use that next time. –  bjesus Aug 30 '11 at 10:32

I was having an heck of time passing extra context variables from my custom login view-function to the template. They were all printing out as the empty string, despite following advice from a number of people a lot smarter than me.

Turns out my urls.py entry was still pointing to the built in login view, not my custom one.

Please don't let this happen to you.

When you eliminate the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth. -- Mr. Spock

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