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I am new to MySQL and was creating a complex EER diagram. After creation, I "Forward Engineer..." the model and hit the dreaded ERROR: Error 1005: Can't create table 'xxx.xxx' (errno: 121). I created another simplified model of two tables with a 1:M relationship, but used "id_" for the primary and foreign key names. That worked.

i.e.
TABLE_A
  id_TABLE_A INT

TABLE_B
  id_TABLE_B INT
  id_TABLE_A INT

where, there is a one to many relationship between TABLE_A [1]--<[M] TABLE_B, and TABLE_B.id_TABLE_A is the foreign key

Looking at my complex EER diagram, I noticed I used "id" with no underscore for the primary and foreign key names. I inserted the underscore after "id" and Forward Engineer'ed the model and it worked with no errors. So, here are two simple example models, one with the "id_" and the other with "id". The "id_" DOES NOT cause the Error 1005 and the "id" causes the Error 1005. Anyone with an idea as to why this anomaly happens with MySQL?

=============================================================================== Good Model:

SET @OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS=@@UNIQUE_CHECKS, UNIQUE_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_SQL_MODE=@@SQL_MODE, SQL_MODE='TRADITIONAL';

CREATE SCHEMA IF NOT EXISTS `mydb` DEFAULT CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci ;
USE `mydb` ;

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_A` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_A` (
  `id_TABLE_A` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id_TABLE_A`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `id_TABLE_A_UNIQUE` (`id_TABLE_A` ASC) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;


DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_B` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_B` (
  `id_TABLE_B` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `id_TABLE_A` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id_TABLE_B`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `id_TABLE_B_UNIQUE` (`id_TABLE_B` ASC) ,
  INDEX `id_TABLE_A` (`id_TABLE_A` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `id_TABLE_A`
    FOREIGN KEY (`id_TABLE_A` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`TABLE_A` (`id_TABLE_A` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;


SET SQL_MODE=@OLD_SQL_MODE;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS;
SET UNIQUE_CHECKS=@OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS;

RESULT:

Build is successful.

===============================================================================

Bad Model:

SET @OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS=@@UNIQUE_CHECKS, UNIQUE_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@@FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS, FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=0;
SET @OLD_SQL_MODE=@@SQL_MODE, SQL_MODE='TRADITIONAL';

CREATE SCHEMA IF NOT EXISTS `mydb` DEFAULT CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_swedish_ci ;
USE `mydb` ;


DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_A` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_A` (
  `idTABLE_A` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idTABLE_A`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `idTABLE_A_UNIQUE` (`idTABLE_A` ASC) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;


DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_B` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_B` (
  `idTABLE_B` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `idTABLE_A` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idTABLE_B`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `idTABLE_B_UNIQUE` (`idTABLE_B` ASC) ,
  INDEX `idTABLE_A` (`idTABLE_A` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `idTABLE_A`
    FOREIGN KEY (`idTABLE_A` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`TABLE_A` (`idTABLE_A` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;


SET SQL_MODE=@OLD_SQL_MODE;
SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS=@OLD_FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS;
SET UNIQUE_CHECKS=@OLD_UNIQUE_CHECKS;

RESULT:

Executing SQL script in server
ERROR: Error 1005: Can't create table 'mydb.table_b' (errno: 121)

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `mydb`.`TABLE_B` (
  `idTABLE_B` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `idTABLE_A` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idTABLE_B`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `idTABLE_B_UNIQUE` (`idTABLE_B` ASC) ,
  INDEX `idTABLE_A` (`idTABLE_A` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `idTABLE_A`
    FOREIGN KEY (`idTABLE_A` )
    REFERENCES `mydb`.`TABLE_A` (`idTABLE_A` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB

SQL script execution finished: statements: 8 succeeded, 1 failed
share|improve this question
    
Why are you not enclosing identifiers in backticks? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 24 '11 at 20:45
    
i never use backticks - what an utter waste of time and effort unless it's a reserved word or you want spaces in it - so avoid reserved words and spaces - SIMPLE. –  f00 Feb 24 '11 at 20:52

1 Answer 1

This would normally happen if your constraint name is conflicting with another name. See comments at http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/innodb-error-codes.html and http://forums.mysql.com/read.php?22,33999,76181#msg-76181

But here... A MySQL bug?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Joe, thank you for your response, I did not write the SQL code here ... this is how it was generated by using "Forward Engineer...", therefore the backticks. I just copied it and pasted it in. But the "backticks" are besides the point of my post. What is intriguing here is prepending "id_" does not generate the 1005 error out and using "id" generates the 1005 error where all else is the same. Try it. –  Rob Hoth Feb 25 '11 at 21:57
    
Hi Capsule, that's what I am thinking too (i.e. a mysql bug), because everything else is the same between the two except for "id_" and "id". Is there a centralize place I can report a potential mysql bug? –  Rob Hoth Feb 25 '11 at 22:05
    
bugs.mysql.com is the place. –  Capsule Feb 27 '11 at 10:52
    
I just solved a problem where I was getting this error message and it turned out to be a conflicting constraint name. Basically, the problem is that there is one global namespace for all constraint names, and when you're creating a table, there's no easy way to make sure you don't conflict with an existing constraint name unless you use a naming convention that prevents such accidents. p.s. Here it is 2013 and our latest, greatest database server can't even give us a meaningful error message and we are reduced to cryptic error codes as if it were 1955... –  Danger Jan 30 '13 at 19:23

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