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I have a GridView where my DataSource is:

items.Select(i => new { ID = i.ID, Foo = i }).ToList();

In the RowDataBound I want to access the object, but I don't know how to cast it...

grid.RowDataBound += (s, e) =>
{
    if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow)
    {
        dynamic item = e.Row.DataItem as 'what?';
    }
};

How can I access this object properties?


Steps to reproduce

  1. Create a website
  2. Create a page (default.aspx) and place a <asp:GridView ID="grid" runat="server" />
  3. In the code behind:

add

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs ev)
{
    var provider = new FooProvider();

    grid.DataSource = provider.Elements;
    grid.RowDataBound += (s, e) =>
    {
        if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow)
        {
            dynamic item = e.Row.DataItem;

            var test = item.ID;
        }
    };
    grid.DataBind();
}
  1. Create a Class Library project
  2. Add a file FooProvider.cs

Code:

public class FooProvider
{
    public IEnumerable<dynamic> Elements
    {
        get
        {
            return new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }
                .Select(i => new { ID = i, Foo = i * 3 }).ToList();
        }
    }
}

Then add the reference on the website.


Expected result: Get the ID of the anonymous object.

Current result:

RuntimeBinderException was unhandled by user code

'object' does not contain a definition for 'ID'


Is reflection the only way?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean by casting to an anonymous type? –  BoltClock Feb 24 '11 at 21:03
1  
If you don't know the type of the object in advance, how do you expect to access its properties anyway? Reflection? If you don't know the type of the items in your GridView then what would you do with them? –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 24 '11 at 21:08
    
@jamietre: He knows what type it is: he just hasn't declared a class for it. It's an anonymous class with a specific signature. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 24 '11 at 21:14
    
Ah ok - actually interesting, would "var" allow the properties of an anonymous type to be used? I don't think so because there's a missing link between DataItem and var. Class it is. –  Jamie Treworgy Feb 24 '11 at 21:19
    
@jamietre: Exactly. var would work once you've actually cast the object to the right type, but now that I realize these are in two different assemblies, there's no way to perform that cast. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 25 '11 at 3:11
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you're using dynamic you don't need to cast it at all. Just cast the values that you know the type of.

dynamic item = e.Row.DataItem;
DoSomething((int)item.Foo)

(Though I agree with David B that I'd rather have a type safe, declared class.)

And by the way, there is a trick you can use with generics which would allow you to do something like this:

var item = e.Row.DataItem.CastAnonymous(new {ID = 1, Foo = 1});
DoSomething(item.Foo);

... but I think that's the worst of the three options.

Edit

When working across assemblies, reflection is the only way to do what you're asking. Anonymous types were always intended to stay within the confines of a single method--that's why you can't declare them as a parameter or a return type. They make things like LINQ statements far less tedious, but their purpose is not to make C# into a scripting language. Is there a reason that you're dead-set against declaring a strong type?

share|improve this answer
    
DataItem is an object, item ends up being of type object. When I access .Foo it says object doesn't have a property Foo –  BrunoLM Feb 24 '11 at 21:06
2  
@BrunoLM: item is actually a dynamic with an underlying object of your anonymous type. Due the the dynamic nature of it, you can say item.Foo. I just tried it: it works. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 24 '11 at 21:10
    
I noticed that my problem happens because I have different assemblies. (added more info on the question) –  BrunoLM Feb 25 '11 at 0:30
    
@BrunoLM: I guess that's not too surprising: even anonymous types with the same signature are incompatible if they're in different assemblies. I'd say this is all the more reason you should define a class. When dynamic was announced, purists foresaw that people would try to use it like this, and trembled. It has its uses, but this is not one of them. –  StriplingWarrior Feb 25 '11 at 3:09
    
I guess what I am trying to do is "select whatever from database and return it in a single object". Thanks for your help :) –  BrunoLM Feb 25 '11 at 10:42
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Why not use DataBinder.Eval() ?

    grid.RowDataBound += (s, e) =>
    {
        if (e.Row.RowType == DataControlRowType.DataRow)
        {
            var test = DataBinder.Eval(e.Row.DataItem, "Id");
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use the opensource Impromptu-Interface framework to duck cast an anonymous type to a static interface allowing it to work in another assembly.

Impromptu interface is actually using the the same api as the dynamic keyword except that it sets the context to the framework you declared your anonymous type in. That way the dynamic invocation will resolve properly (since anonymous types are compiled as internal).

return new int[] { 1, 2, 3 }
            .Select(i => new { ID = i, Foo = i * 3 }
                            .ActLike<IMyMadeUpInterface>()).ToList();
share|improve this answer
add comment

I don't think you can. I had something similar going on a while back and as I recall i had to use <% %> notation to refer to the anonymous properties (ID and Foo, in your case). If you have more complex processing to do in your RowDataBound you'll have to define a class.

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Don't use anonymous types. Make a class.

public class MyCustomRow
{
  int ID {get;set;}
  Foo Foo {get;set;}
}

(wtf? dynamic?)

share|improve this answer
2  
To make the point more general, anonymous types are a convience that can be used when a type is only used in a single place in your code and never needs to be referenced by name. You're doing something that references your type by name, and so therefor you can't use an anonymous type. –  Nimrand Feb 24 '11 at 21:14
    
Well sure, Nimrand - I decided not to describe why one should not try to use the name of an anonymous type in my answer to avoid redundancy. –  David B Feb 24 '11 at 21:16
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var item = e.Row.DataItem; doesn't work?

can you not create a custom model class to store the information so that you can cast it?

share|improve this answer
    
DataItem is an object public virtual object DataItem { get; set; } It doesn't have the property Foo –  BrunoLM Feb 24 '11 at 21:04
    
no, DataItem is an object. It must be cast to the appropriate type in order to be used (well, normally). –  Anthony Pegram Feb 24 '11 at 21:04
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