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I have some software that I would like to make a TCP client. I don't know if this is the best architecture, but in my software I spawn a thread that will be used for the Network I/O. If there is a better architecture, I'd appreciate some pointers and advice.

Both threads have a refernce to the boost::asio::io_service object and a Session object that encapsulates the socket object. The sesson object is roughly as follows:

  class Session
  {
  public:

  Session(
    boost::asio::io_service & io_service,
    std::string const & ip_address,
    std::string const & port)
  : io_service_(io_service),
    resolver_(io_service),
    socket_(io_service),
    ip_address_(ip_address),
    port_(port),
  {}

  virtual void start();
  virtual ~Session();
  virtual void stop();
  void write(std::string const & msg);

  void handle_resolve(
    const boost::system::error_code & error,
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_itr);

  void handle_connect(
    const boost::system::error_code & error,
    boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_itr);

  void handle_close();
  void handle_write(const boost::system::error_code & error);

private:
  boost::asio::io_service & io_service_;
  boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver resolver_;
  boost::asio::ip::tcp::socket socket_;
  std::string ip_address_;
  std::string port_;
};

In the I/O thread run-loop, the start() method of the session object is called which connects to the server. (This works, btw). Then, the thread sits in a loop calling the run() method on the I/O service object [io_service_.run()] to trigger events.

The main thread calls the write() method of the session when it wants to send data, and the session object calls boost::async_write with the data to write and then a callback method that is a member of the session object (handle_write).

While I have the I/O thread connecting to the server, I cannot get the handle_write method to be triggered. I have verified that the main thread is calling into the session object and executing async_write() on the socket. It is just that the callback is never triggered. I also don't see any data on the server side or over the wire with tcpdump.

Any idea where my problem might be? Is there a better way to organize the architecture? Most of all, I don't want to block the main thread doing I/O.

Here is the code that spawns the io thread from the main thread (apologies for the spacing):

    boost::asio::io_service io_service;
    boost::shared_ptr<Session> session_ptr;
    boost::thread io_thread;
    ....
    session_ptr.reset(
      new Session::Session(
                io_service,
                std::string("127.0.0.1"),
                std::string("17001")));

    // spawn new thread for the network I/O endpoint
    io_thread = boost::thread(
      boost::bind(
        &Session::start,
        session_ptr_.get()));

The code for the start() method is as follows:

    void Session::start()
    {
      typedef boost::asio::ip::tcp tcp;

      tcp::resolver::query query(
          tcp::v4(),
          ip_address_,
          port_);  

      resolver_.async_resolve(
          query,
          boost::bind(
              &Session::handle_resolve,
              this,
              boost::asio::placeholders::error,
              boost::asio::placeholders::iterator));

      while(1){ // improve this later
        io_service_.run();
      }
    }

The callback for the resolver:

    void Session::handle_resolve(
        const boost::system::error_code & error,
        boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_itr)
    {
      if (!error)
      {
        boost::asio::ip::tcp::endpoint endpoint = *endpoint_itr;
        socket_.async_connect(
            endpoint,
            boost::bind(
              &Session::handle_connect,
              this,
              boost::asio::placeholders::error,
              ++endpoint_itr));
      }
      else
      {
        std::cerr << "Failed to resolve\n";
        std::cerr << "Error: " << error.message() << std::endl;
      }
    }

The callback for connect:

    void Session::handle_connect(
        const boost::system::error_code & error,
        boost::asio::ip::tcp::resolver::iterator endpoint_itr)
    {
      typedef boost::asio::ip::tcp tcp;

      if (!error)
      {
        std::cerr << "Connected to the server!\n";
      }
      else if (endpoint_itr != tcp::resolver::iterator())
      {
        socket_.close();
        socket_.async_connect(
            *endpoint_itr,
            boost::bind(
              &Session::handle_connect,
              this,
              boost::asio::placeholders::error,
              ++endpoint_itr));
      }
      else
      {
        std::cerr << "Failed to connect\n";
      }

    }

The write() method that the main thread can call to send post an asychronous write.

    void Session::write(
        std::string const & msg)
    {
      std::cout << "Write: " << msg << std::endl;
      boost::asio::async_write(
          socket_,
          boost::asio::buffer(
              msg.c_str(),
              msg.length()),
          boost::bind(
              &Session::handle_write,
              this,
              boost::asio::placeholders::error));     
    }

And finally, the write completion callback:

    void Session::handle_write(
        const boost::system::error_code & error)
    {
      if (error)
      {
         std::cout << "Write complete with errors !!!\n";
      }
      else
      {
         std::cout << "Write complete with no errors\n";
      }        
    }
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1  
could we see the code for your start(), write(), handle_connect(), and handle_write() functions? –  diverscuba23 Feb 25 '11 at 0:17
    
Your example is incomplete, post more code. It is very common to use asio in the way you've described, a main thread, and a second thread invoking the io_service event loop. –  Sam Miller Feb 25 '11 at 2:22
    
Added the code as requested. I essentially took most of this from the HTTP client example. –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 14:59
    
your updated question is still incomplete, we need to see the Session class definition. –  Sam Miller Feb 25 '11 at 17:46
    
Sorry about that, hopefully this will provide all of the information needed. Thank you. –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 18:16
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like your io service will run out of work after connect, after which you just call io_service::run again? It looks like run is being called in the while loop, however I can't see a call to reset anywhere. You need to call io::service::reset before you call run on the same io_service again.

Structurally, it would be better to add work to the io_service, then you don't need to call it in the loop and the run will exit once you call io_service::stop.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for noticing the io_service will run out of work after the connect handler. –  Sam Miller Feb 25 '11 at 18:02
    
Ah, I see, I didn't realize I needed to call reset. How does the work thing go? When my client is idle and waiting for things to happen (e.g. waiting for an event from the main thread or waiting for a command from the server, should I have a read posted just to keep the io_service valid? –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 18:22
    
By giving the io_service work, you don't need to have any outstanding async operation such as a read. The run method will only return once you call the stop method. –  Ralf Feb 25 '11 at 19:54
    
I think I understand. I would post a read, write some data, and when the read callback is triggered I could post another read. This would keep the io_service busy with work, right? –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 19:55
    
@Dr yes, you've got it. That is the elegance of an asynchronous design. The handlers queue up additional work, keeping the io_service loop active. –  Sam Miller Feb 25 '11 at 20:35
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this portion of your code

boost::asio::io_service io_service;
boost::shared_ptr<Session> session_ptr;
boost::thread io_thread;
....
session_ptr.reset(
  new Session::Session(
            io_service,
            std::string("127.0.0.1"),
            std::string("17001")));

// spawn new thread for the network I/O endpoint
io_thread = boost::thread(
  boost::bind(
    &Session::start,
    session_ptr_.get()));

is a red flag to me. Your io_service object is possibly going out of scope and causing strange behavior. An io_service is not copyable, so passing it to your Session as a non-const reference is probably not what you are hoping to achieve.

samm@macmini ~> grep -C 2 noncopyable  /usr/include/boost/asio/io_service.hpp 
#include <boost/asio/detail/epoll_reactor_fwd.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/detail/kqueue_reactor_fwd.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/detail/noncopyable.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/detail/select_reactor_fwd.hpp>
#include <boost/asio/detail/service_registry_fwd.hpp>
--
 */
class io_service
  : private noncopyable
{
private:
--
/// Class used to uniquely identify a service.
class io_service::id
  : private noncopyable
{
public:
--
/// Base class for all io_service services.
class io_service::service
  : private noncopyable
{
public:

If you're basing your code off the HTTP client example, you should note the io_service is in scope all the time inside of main(). As Ralf pointed out, your io_service is also likely running out of work to do after the connect handler, which is why you've kludged it to invoke run() inside of a loop

while(1){ // improve this later
  io_service_.run();
}

again, note that the HTTP client example does not do this. You need to start another async operation inside of the connect handler, either a read or write depending on what your application needs.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, well spotted, didn't see the io_service going out of scope (unless the OP is joining the thread) –  Ralf Feb 25 '11 at 18:03
    
Should the I/O service be part of the Session object then? –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 18:23
    
@Ralf, yes, the main thread is joining on the thread. It is an event based thread itself. –  Dr. Watson Feb 25 '11 at 18:24
    
@Dr the io_service does not need to be a member of the Session object if it stays in scope for the lifetime of the thread. –  Sam Miller Feb 25 '11 at 20:33
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