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It seems like IDataReader.Read() is always true at least one time (If I'm wrong about this let me know.) So how do you tell if it has no records without just wrapping it in a try/catch?

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Ben is correct. If an IDataReader is reading from an empty row set then the first call to Read() will return false (assuming the specific implementation you're using is written correctly). – Matt Hamilton Feb 25 '09 at 9:22
if(dr.Read())
{
   //do stuff
}
else
{
 //it's empty
}

usually you'll do this though:

while(dr.Read())
{
}
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1  
This is what I've tried, but it seems that the condition is always true at least once, but then if try to extract a value from the reader it throws an error. – JC Grubbs Sep 9 '08 at 2:20

Yes, if you want to use the interface then Read until false is the only way to test. If you are looking for a generic IDataReader implementation, you could try DbDataReader and use the HasRows property.

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2  
DbDataReader is an abstract class – aku Sep 9 '08 at 2:18
    
@aku: Yes, that's the point. IDataReader is an interface that is (usually) implemented by a datareader of type whatever which derives from DbDataReader, which in turn implements IDataReader. – Stefan Steiger Apr 22 '13 at 12:23
    
In reality, you'll never call Read() on an IDataReader object anyway, since there's no such thing. And in pretty much all actual implementations you'll get back an object which is a DbdataReader. So unless you got classes 'downgrading' that back to IDataReader as their return type, you can just call that. And even if it does get downgraded, it's worth checking: if (reader is DbDataReader) return ((DbDataReader)reader).HasRows – Nyerguds Apr 28 at 11:33

You can just cast System.Data.IDataReader to System.Data.Common.DbDataReader

using (System.Data.IDataReader IReader = ICommand.ExecuteReader())
{
    if (((System.Data.Common.DbDataReader)IReader).HasRows)
    {
        //do stuff
    }
} // End Using IReader 

It's pure evil, but it (usually) works ;)
(assuming your instance of IDataReader is implemented by a custom ADO.NET provider, and not some custom silly class of yours which just implements IDataReader instead of deriving from DbDataReader [which implements IDataReader]).

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Just stumbled across this problem and came up with this...

bool isBeforeEoF;

do
{
    isBeforeEoF = reader.Read();

    if (isBeforeEoF)
    {
        yield return new Foo()
        {
            StreamID = (Guid)reader["ID"],
            FileType = (string)reader["Type"],
            Name = (string)reader["Name"],
            RelativePath = (string)reader["RelativePath"]
        };         
    }

} while (isBeforeEoF);
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