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So, is there any way to make Visual Studio
- compile C++ app for linux using gcc.
- When i hit debug - run application in VirtualBOX ( or other VM software ) using gdb.

Edit: don't offer me other IDE - i know about Eclipse, KDevelop, NETBeans, Anjuta ...

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You might want to look at WinGDB. It looks like you are exact match for their target audience.

Note 1: I have no experience with this product. I just happen to know about its existence.

Note 2: If you decide to use this product, I would like to know about your experience.

Good luck...

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Downloaded their trial version , installed , and got really unstable product - so cannot write more about this ( all i got work is simple hello world with debug ) - writed em about bugs, but currently only solution for me is make as much as possible as Windows Console app., then move it to linux and fit details. –  SergeS Feb 25 '11 at 9:34

Simple answer is sorry but now.. but this might help you..

Eclipse has support for using gcc with its CDK, however the closest you get with Visual Studio is the mono support which has Visual Studio integration but of course this if C#.

Though in theory you could create a bespoke tool based upon gnu2msdos that compiled the source and feed the error back to VS in a manor that could be used to aid navigation around the errors but I don't know of anyone who has done this..

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Maybe a little late, but I found what I searched for: NetBeans

I'm at a windows xp workstation, and I'm building a Linux application. Since now I used Visual Studio to edit/browse source located on a linux server via samba share, ad a putty session to launch make manually in a shell console.

Today I found NetBeans, and I think it fulfills all my needs:

  • it asks for the compiling host, and I can submit an ssh host (with private key access, so no bothering for passowrd asking dialogs)
  • it has an excellent automatic recognition of compiling/debugging tools: it discovered all the gnu tools installed in the linux server
  • it can build the project by automatically launch make with a button
  • it can parse gdb commands and outputs providing run-time debug of linux application in windows environment
  • it has clearcase plugin which is good for my clearcase project

Sorry to seem so enthusiastic, but at a first impression it has all what I was searching for on internet (and I also stumbled on this question)...I'll come back here to adjust my impressions after some everyday usage...

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good point to try NetBeans ( i use em for web development now ), pros you wrote it can do are really good and can overweight pros of Visual Studio ... but still this answer is a bit aside from original question (Now i dont want to change my IDE) –  SergeS Dec 29 '11 at 10:56

Well there is VisualGDB and WinGDB which are Visual Studio Add-ins (~$100, 30-days trial). I have tried VisualGDB and the experience so far has been fantastic. I can debug a Linux application running on a Raspberry Pi as if it were on running on Windows (an that includes the Qt toolchain which is not that easy to integrate).

The coolest thing about it is that you can cross-compile very fast in your own development PC and automatically download the app to your target device (or PC) via SSH and run, all with one F5 command.

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No. Not as delivered by Microsoft. Visual C++ is not a cross-compiler nor does visual studio support invoking other compilers.

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That is a very fast no. In fact, you can use Visual C++ to run different compilers (e.g. Intel C++ compiler), and the simplest trick is to use make files. I think the major problem is to build a linux-compatible binary, which you might be able to do it through specially configured cygwin since it is still ELF output. –  Peon the Great Feb 24 '11 at 22:40
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Add an answer and give the details @Peon. I wouldn't consider makefiles to be using visual studio. –  John Weldon Feb 24 '11 at 22:42
    
Came across this code.google.com/p/vs-android It's a proof of concept that you can cross-compile using Visual Studio. –  Peon the Great Mar 8 '11 at 18:35
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Thanks for the follow up @Peon; I think you should post an answer as it would be valuable for the record. –  John Weldon Mar 9 '11 at 0:51

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