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i was wondering how to implement a callback into this piece of code

MyClass.myMethod("sth.", myCallback);
function myCallback() { // do sth };

var MyClass = {

myMethod : function(params, callback) {

    // do some stuff

    FB.method: 'sth.',
       'perms': 'sth.'
       'display': 'iframe'
      },
      function(response) {

            if (response.perms != null) {
                // How to pass response to callback ?
            } else {
                // How to pass response to callback ?
            }
      });
}

}

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9 Answers 9

up vote 5 down vote accepted

All you have to do is call the callback function the normal way. In this case you would just do callback(response).

var MyClass = {

myMethod : function(params, callback) {

// do some stuff

FB.method: { 'sth.',
   'perms': 'sth.'
   'display': 'iframe'
  },
  function(response) {

        if (response.perms != null) {
            // How to pass response to callback ?
            // Easy as:
            callback(response);
        } else {
            // How to pass response to callback ?
            // Again:
            callback(response);
        }
  });
}

}
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So easy. Thanks –  fabian Feb 24 '11 at 22:42
    
No problem. :) Feel free to mark it as the answer then. –  alpha123 Feb 24 '11 at 22:53

three ways to achieve "// How to pass response to callback ?" :

  1. callback(response, otherArg1, otherArg2);
  2. callback.call(this, response, otherArg1, otherArg2);
  3. callback.apply(this, [response, otherArg1, otherArg2]);

1 is the simplest, 2 is in case you want to control the 'this' variable's value inside your callbackfunction, and 3 is similar to 2, but you can pass a variable number of arguments to callback.

here is a decent reference: http://odetocode.com/Blogs/scott/archive/2007/07/05/function-apply-and-function-call-in-javascript.aspx

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Very complete answer... nice! –  Chris Baker Feb 24 '11 at 22:46

Just invoke the passed in function.

callback(response)
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You're close... just use the callback. In this instance, you can form a closure.

var MyClass = {

myMethod : function(params, callback) {

    // do some stuff

    FB.method: 'sth.',
       'perms': 'sth.'
       'display': 'iframe'
      },
      function(response) {

            if (response.perms != null) {
                callback(response);
            } else {
                // response is null, but you can pass it the same as you did above - if you want to.  Probably better to have a generic failure handler
                ajaxFailHandler();
            }
      });
}
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I think you can simply call callback(response.perms) there. You could also register it as a

member of your class:

  MyClass.cb = callback;

and later call it:

 MyClass.cb(response.perms)
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You've got a reference to a function now. Just invoke it:

callback(response.perms);
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callback.call(null, response);
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MyClass.myMethod("sth.", myCallback);
var myCallback = function myCallback() { // do sth }

var MyClass = {

myMethod : function(params, callback) {

    // do some stuff

    FB.method: 'sth.',
       'perms': 'sth.'
       'display': 'iframe'
      },
      function(response) {

            if (response.perms != null) {
                callback();
            } else {
                callback();
            }
      });
}

}
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1  
Not sure why you posted this... but you're not passing the response variable to your callback. callback(response); will do the trick - as indicated in the other answers. –  Chris Baker Feb 24 '11 at 22:42

var callback = function() {

};

Thats it :-)

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Wouldn't it be callback(response)? –  mellamokb Feb 24 '11 at 22:36
    
Sry, I dont get that? –  fabian Feb 24 '11 at 22:37
1  
This does not seem to have any bearing on the question. –  Chris Baker Feb 24 '11 at 22:39
    
Well, I could just call callback() in the dephest method. –  fabian Feb 24 '11 at 22:39
    
@fabian: Exactly, as the other 6 posters suggested :) –  mellamokb Feb 24 '11 at 22:39

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