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In my web.xml I use something like this:

  <security-constraint>
        <web-resource-collection>
              <web-resource-name>Block all</web-resource-name>
              <url-pattern>/*</url-pattern>
        </web-resource-collection>
        <auth-constraint/>
  </security-constraint>

  <security-constraint>
        <web-resource-collection>
              <web-resource-name>Allow facelets</web-resource-name>
              <url-pattern>/faces/*</url-pattern>
              <http-method>POST</http-method>
              <http-method>GET</http-method>
        </web-resource-collection>
        <auth-constraint>
              <role-name>*</role-name>
        <auth-constraint>
  </security-constraint>

All incoming requests are blocked except for those which start with /faces/. I do so because, otherwise, unauthorized users could access to facelets source files.

It works fine but it doesn't show welcome file because even the root path is blocked. I tried to add <url-pattern>/</url-pattern> to second security-constraint but nothing.

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I'm the only one who have this kind of problem! Is there an alternative way to protect facelets source files? –  Alf Mar 1 '11 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you can, map the FacesServlet on the suffix pattern instead. When you're still on JSF 1.x, map it on *.jsf. Then you can just block access on *.xhtml with that security constraint. When you're already on JSF 2.0 (your question history confirms this), just map it on *.xhtml. In contrary to in JSF 1.x, the FacesServlet won't run in an infinite loop with that. This way you don't need any security constraint at all. The only con is that you won't be able to serve "plain vanilla" XHTML files without involving the FacesServlet. But doing so wouldn't make any sense anyway, such a file has to be served as *.html anyway.

PS: Thank you for providing another reason why the /faces/* prefix pattern sucks ;)

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It works fine but it doesn't show welcome file because even the root path is blocked. I tried to add / to second security-constraint but nothing.

In this case, it should have worked. I tested it in my machine, it doesn't work the first time. until, we restart the application server. then it behaves as expected.

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Oh, and we updated our web.xml: our <welcome-file-list> was <welcome-file>/index.xhtml</welcome-file>, we updated it to <welcome-file>index.xhtml</welcome-file> –  SDReyes May 22 '12 at 14:58

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