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I'm a huge fan of XML documentation in .NET.

However, I can honestly say I've never seen a tutorial or project where, for example, we had markup like this:

/// <summary>
/// dummy text
/// </summary>
/// <returns>blah</returns>
public ActionResult LogOff() {
    FormsService.SignOut();

    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
}

Instead of:

// **************************************
// URL: /Account/LogOff
// **************************************

public ActionResult LogOff() {
    FormsService.SignOut();

    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
}

Is there any particular reason for this? Am I the only one who wants to document my Controller's methods?

EDIT 1:

And while most controller methods seem to be simple, how about cases detailed in say this question: MVC: How to work with entities with many child entities? ?

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I question your reasoning for saying "nobody". How many MVC projects could you possibly be exposed to? –  jfar Feb 25 '11 at 4:42
    
@jfar: Heh. I think I actually stayed away from saying 'nobody.' "I can honestly say I've never seen a tutorial or project [...]" And certainly seeing a project where they did document their Controllers would be relevant to this question. –  James Skemp Feb 25 '11 at 13:06
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

XML documentation is great when the public API needs to be documented for external parties using it. Controllers in my opinion, don't fall into that category.

Also in line with slim controllers, they should be self explanatory as to what they do, especially with attribute metadata such as HttpPost and HttpGet.

Do you envisage a third party using your controllers as an API?

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So, the only benefit of XML documentation is for third parties (by which I assume you also mean internal parties, since I'd assume documenting a class library for internal consumption is a good thing)? –  James Skemp Feb 25 '11 at 2:44
    
Yes - I would say so. If the developer is exposed to the actual code (ie: not using it as a "library" but using it as "code" - if you will), then XML documentation is less relevant, especially for such self explanatory and obvious things as controllers. For third party use (either internal or external use as a library) the XML docs are useful since you can't see the code, but again, in reality, if the method is named correctly, does what it says it does and doesn't have any skeletons in the closet then it is wasted effort in my opinion. But this is about to get religious ;) –  Michael Shimmins Feb 25 '11 at 5:09
    
You're right, we're starting to move towards that debate. I'm going to bump you up from 5 to 6 up votes, since you've got excellent points, but I'm going to let the question ride for a bit more, since I know we're on different sides of that debate, and I'm hoping someone from my 'side' will have a perfect example ... :D –  James Skemp Feb 25 '11 at 13:16
    
I'm giving you the accepted answer. On further thought, these won't be used by a third party, nor will they really be used by a first-party, at least to such an extent where they'd need the documentation. –  James Skemp Mar 18 '11 at 13:21
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I usually document my controller actions with a short description of what that action is meant to do, for example:

/// <summary>
/// Controller for viewing and updating the jobs list.
/// </summary>
public class JobsController : Controller
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Displays a list of all jobs for a given site.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="siteId">Id of the site to view jobs for.</param>
    public ActionResult Index(string siteId);

    /// <summary>
    /// Displays a detail view of a single job.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="id">Id of the job to view.</param> 
    public ActionResult Detail(string id);
}

It's not quite the same as my xml documentation for other classes because these classes will never be used directly, and so its more documentation of the site / page behaviour than anything else. That said I find it useful to have a description of what the action does and what the parameters are, and here is as good a place as any.

Note that I don't include the path - not only because if the path changes the information is out of date, but also becasue it should be obvious by looking at the route mappings what the path will be anyway.

Update / response to comments:

This sort of documentation may seem entirely pointless as the classes are pretty much self describing anyway, however on well named methods in properly structured code this is usually the case with XML documentation anyway. I still believe that this sort of documentation adds value however:

  • It clarifies what the class / method / parameter does in plain english
  • In confirms that nothing special is happening (as opposed to someone just not bothering to write the documentation).

Note that I don't document the return value as there is absolutely nothing useful that I can ever say about it.

You also need to consider that this example is incredibly contrived - it could be that certain parametrs are JSON serialised data, or that a negative value means something completely different. My view on XML documentation is that you should either document nothing, or you should document everything (no matter how obvious). If only half your methods are documented then you can never tell if its because its entirely obvious, or if the developer was simply too lazy - also consider that the purpose of a method may not be as obvious to others as it is to you.

For example I don't bother to write documentation for event handlers (I used to but the comment was always exactly the same).

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Documentation like this is a tautology. You've provided nothing more than what could be implied by convention. –  jfar Feb 25 '11 at 4:10
    
@jfar on well named methods in properly structured code, XML documentation usually is anyway - it still adds value however because it clarifies what the class / method does in plain english and it confirms that nothing special is going on (rather than someone just not bothering to write the comments). –  Justin Feb 25 '11 at 4:25
1  
@jfar The same comments could be applied to most xml documentation. I find xml documentation usful all of the time, and the code that causes me the most grief is invariably not documented - in short there is a definite correlation between XML documentation and code quality, and I'm a quality over quantity sorta-guy! :-) –  Justin Feb 25 '11 at 5:03
1  
@jfar Alsoi if I'm honest its a self-discipline thing too. The only thing that makes XML documentation difficult to write is badly structured code or confusing architecture. By making myself write documentation for all my methods it discourages me from hacking things together and coding anything that I don't want to document! –  Justin Feb 25 '11 at 5:12
1  
@Kragan - Your answer sounds pretty personal. Bad code can exist with documentation. Quality code can exist without documentation. Documentation does not make bad code better. If your focusing on quality spend more time refactoring rather than telling us that GetProducts() returns a collection of products. –  jfar Feb 25 '11 at 5:18
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