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I have a tag that contains a dot (.) that I want haml to preserve:

Haml:

%text
 %text.resource
  ...

I would like Haml to expand to:

<text>
   <text.resource>...
   </text.resource>
<text>

but it keeps doing:

<text>
   <text class="resource">...
   <text>
<text>

Is there any easy way to "escape" "class" expansion in Haml?

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if this is in rails, you might be able to use the content_for method to generate your content... –  Jed Schneider Feb 25 '11 at 1:06
    
Perhaps you should consider using other template engine instead of HAML, such as RXML, for generating XML. HAML is not meant for it. –  Mladen Jablanović Feb 25 '11 at 6:41

1 Answer 1

HAML is made to generate HTML of various forms, but you can trick it to generate other things by being creative. Putting in what you want to get back out:

<text>
<text.resource>...
</text.resource>
<text>

will work, because if HAML sees a line that doesn't start with one of its reserved characters it'll output it as is. You can't indent though, or it will get mad.

From the docs:

Note that HTML tags are passed through unmodified as well. If you have some HTML you don’t want to convert to Haml, or you’re converting a file line-by-line, you can just include it as-is. For example:

%p
  <div id="blah">Blah!</div>

is compiled to:

<p>
  <div id="blah">Blah!</div>
</p>

You could do:

<text>
= "  <text.resource>..."
= "  </text.resource>"
<text>

if you insist on indentation:

>>    <text>
>>      <text.resource>...
>>      </text.resource>
>>    <text>

EDIT:

The OP says:

the problem I have is that the elypsis (...) means that I have to add more haml code there (a bunch of xml tags that would be "children" of and therefore I need to "indent" the lines after the comments...

XML doesn't care about indentation; Indentation is a for-human-eyes-only aesthetic. I'd worry more about being functionally and syntactically correct. If you absolutely have to have "pretty" XML, then consider running the HAML output through xmllint, or tidy with the xml flags set.

Or, abandon HAML because you're starting to abuse it, and use something like ERB and/or Erubis which is more free form and less caring about syntax, or go old-school and generate the XML via print and puts statements. If you insist on using HAML and having your indentation, then I'd suggest consulting with the HAML developers and see if they have a recommendation. There might be a HAML filter that would be of use, or some other way of forcing the indentation level inline.

My advice, as someone who's been doing this a long time and been there too many times is: We, as software developers, can lose sight of the end-goal of being functional and spin off into some yak-shaving exercise worrying about minutia that don't accomplish anything real. Unless it's a specification that every indenting space is sacred I'd worry more about getting correct XML and move on, then later return to it and see if it can be tweaked to perfection.

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Thank you for your time, the problem I have is that the elypsis (...) means that I have to add more haml code there (a bunch of xml tags that would be "children" of <text.resource> and therefore I need to "indent" the lines after the comments... –  eblumenfeld Feb 25 '11 at 12:45
    
@eblumenfeld, see the added edit. –  the Tin Man Feb 25 '11 at 16:46
    
thank you again for your time, you are right about trying to go to erb if it doesn't work, I tried to find out if I can get in contact with the developers, but there is no contact info for them in the web sites. I wanted to use haml for future maintainability issues, but that sole issue is a showstopper. Thank you again for the advice. –  eblumenfeld Feb 26 '11 at 15:45
    
@eblumenfeld, HAML's developer hosts his issues at github.com/nex3/haml so you can ask there if you think its a bug, or, send him a message via his email listed on his github page. Another alternative is to check into Nokogiri::Builder or Builder (separate gems). –  the Tin Man Feb 26 '11 at 18:22
    
Thank you for the pointer, I did post a feature request in haml and sent an e-mail to the maintainer. Thank you again for your time –  eblumenfeld Feb 28 '11 at 2:56

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